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98% of CISaustralia participants receive academic credit for their overseas program. Use the filters below to browse courses that are available on CISaustralia study abroad programs. Filter by program type, destination and academic area.
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Available Courses by Program

This course aims to establish a strong foundation in basic structures and principles, encouraging further study. Foundational elements include: pronunciation, intonation, basic grammar rules and basic vocabulary. The course blends both traditional materials and methods of instruction with active participation and activities.

This course is for learners who already have some knowledge of French, recent or not. In this course, instructors will make students talk about their field of interest and will quickly use what is said in the class to create the content of the course. Topics of instruction include pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar, all with each student’s abilities and interests in mind.

COURSE: ISITIB101
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, 3, 4, A, B

This course develops basic conversation, reading, and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary, and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to express themselves in basic sentences, recognize gender and number in both nouns and adjectives, and begin approaching the Passato Prossimo. Emphasis will be given to the oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before.

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COURSE: ISITIB165
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This intensive six-credit course is intended for students with no prior knowledge of Italian. It will give students the opportunity to experience a total language immersion, learning how to use gradually more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background, and understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. The course will start from linguistic fundamentals and essential grammatical structures, including singular and plural forms of articles, adjectives, nouns, and their agreement; regular and some irregular conjugations of -are, -ere, -ire verbs in the Present tense; and simple prepositions. It will then move on to reflexive verbs, conjugation of regular and irregular verbs in the Past, and direct object pronouns. It will finally introduce students to Future and Conditional tenses, possessive adjectives, and indirect object pronouns, along with the continued practice of expanding vocabulary and gradual building of complexity in grammatical structures. All lessons will be taught in Italian.

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COURSE: ISITII215
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

Pre-requisites: One semester of Italian language or equivalent. Italian Language Placement Test required.

This intensive six-credit course is intended for students who have previously completed one semester of elementary Italian language studies at the undergraduate level. It will give students the opportunity to experience a total language immersion, building on and extending fundamental skills developed in the elementary course. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to communicate in both written and oral form about topics they are familiar with pertaining to personal interests (i.e. family, hobbies, work, travel), as well as simple aspects of Italian culture. The grammatical structures covered will start with a review of Passato Prossimo and introduce Imperfetto conjugations, direct object pronouns, Future and Conditional tenses, possessive adjectives, and indirect object pronouns, followed by Trapassato Prossimo, Pronomi Relativi and Combinati, Imperativo, and a basic grasp of the four Subjunctive tenses. All lessons will be taught in Italian.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ISITIA301
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session A

Pre-requisites: Four semesters of Italian language or equivalent. Italian Language Placement Test required.

This level is for those students who already have a sound knowledge of Italian grammar and are able to express themselves fluently and articulately using all past tenses. Students should have familiarity with Subjunctive and Conditional tenses in both written and spoken Italian. During the course they will improve vocabulary and comprehension by reading and discussing literary tests as well as newspaper articles on current affairs, culture, and politics. Students will perfect their skills in the use of all verb tenses acquired at the intermediate levels and study the Passive voice.

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COURSE: ISITII201
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

Pre-requisites: One semester of Italian language or equivalent. Italian Language Placement Test required.

This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginning-level course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. Upon course completion, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present Conditional and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.

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COURSE: ISITII250
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, 4, A, B

Pre-requisites: Two semesters of Italian language or equivalent. Italian Language Placement Test required.

This level is for those students who already have an active knowledge of elementary language structures (i.e. the expression of past actions and events, discussion of future plans), can communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background, and can understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to use more complex pronouns both in spoken and written Italian and will have a basic grasp of the following topics: Condizionale, Trapassato Prossimo, Pronomi Relativi, Imperativo and a basic grasp of the four tenses of Subjunctive.

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COURSE: ISITHO130
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January

This course concentrates on rapidly developing a basic command of Italian while introducing the student to various aspects of the Italian culture through the hospitality industry. Students will have the opportunity to learn on-site with their instructors through a series of walking tours and visits in Florence to hotels, restaurants, and wine-related establishments. Technical vocabulary will be enhanced and finalized to prepare the student for the hospitality industry. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary, and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. After taking this course, students will be able to express themselves in the Present tense and Passato Prossimo and to use both nouns and adjectives in the correct form with reference to gender and number. No prior knowledge of Italian required, this is a beginner-level course.

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COURSE: History 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits

The Mediterranean Sea is home to some of the most ancient civilizations in the world. This multi-country program will allow students to immerse in the fascinating history and culture of three of the most beautiful and inspiring cities in Europe. We’ll travel from the ancient Imperial Rome to the Florence of the Renaissance with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, and finish with the modern and extravagant architecture of Gaudi in the vibrant city of Barcelona.

COURSE: International Studies 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits

The Mediterranean Sea is home to some of the most ancient civilizations in the world. This multi-country program will allow students to immerse in the fascinating history and culture of three of the most beautiful and inspiring cities in Europe. We’ll travel from the ancient Imperial Rome to the Florence of the Renaissance with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, and finish with the modern and extravagant architecture of Gaudi in the vibrant city of Barcelona.

COURSE: SPAN 350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July: Session 1 and 2

Why are Spaniards currently exhuming mass graves of the Civil War? How can the country tolerate an unemployment rate of 20 percent? Why has Catalan and Basque nationalism dominated politics for decades? Why does a country with a historic reputation for machismo boast such progressive laws on gender and gay marriages? Why does political corruption remain so prevalent? This course examines political and social issues relevant to Spaniards today. It begins by discussing recent history in order to contextualize the major themes of the past few decades. It then moves to those subjects that emerged out of the transition to democracy – regionalism, terrorism, and linguistic pluralism – and still account for many of the peculiarities of Spanish politics. The second half of the course analyzes “Spain’s Second Transition” under José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero by focusing on immigration, Islamic fundamentalism, foreign policy, gender and family relations, historical memory, political corruption, and the economic crisis. The course is multi-disciplinary, consisting of a mixture of readings from political science, history, and cultural studies. Each session will consist of a lecture and a class discussion.

COURSE: MG 310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July: Session 1

The focus of this course is the analysis of how a business must adapt to different cultural contexts. For this purpose, we study the interaction between the culture and the company’s structure, processes and human resources. In this way, the student will be able to understand strategies used to optimise such interaction. The general objective of the course is to learn the main business practices in different cultures, through the analysis of the differences in various countries. This will provide the background to understand and identify threats and opportunities to do business in a global context.

COURSE: BIOA201
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: One of ARCH 101, ANTH 103, ANTH 106, BIOA 101, BIOL 112, CELS 191, HUBS 191, HUBS 192 and 36 further points, OR 108 points.

An introduction to human bioarchaeology, particularly evolutionary and comparative anatomy of the human body, what makes it unique among other primates, and why it varies among populations. Includes aspects of forensic anthropology.

What makes humans unique to all other primates, and how did we come to be that way? How can we explain the variation in morphology among human populations? How can we use aspects of the skeleton of past people to look at their life history? This paper explores these questions by providing an introduction to the study of Biological Anthropology of the human skeleton. The paper primarily focuses on the evolution, structure and function of the human skeletal system, with an introduction to bioarchaeological and forensic methods.

Assessment
Internal assessment: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 60%

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COURSE: PHSI191
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: Students should have passed at least 5 out of 6 laboratories in PHSI 191, but failed overall in the course with a total final mark of at least 30%. Students who have not met this requirement may seek special permission to enter.

Foundations of physics for the health sciences, including mechanics, properties of fluids and solids, thermodynamics and DC circuits, and radiation and health.

This course is intended for students who have passed their laboratory component in the 2019 first semester PHSI 191 course but failed the course overall with a total mark of at least 30%. This course will be similar to PHSI 191 although there will be no laboratory component, and it will have significantly more tutorial-style contact. The laboratory component of a student’s internal assessment in the 2019 first semester course will be carried over to the Summer School course.

Assessment
Mid-school test: 18%
Homework assignments (6 x 1%): 6%
Lab grade carried over from first semester 2019: 6%
Final examination: 70%

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COURSE: COSC360
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: COSC 242.

This course takes a practical, hands-on approach to making games. We will design, prototype, implement, polish and complete games over the 6-week course. How do we implement a game in a set time frame? How do we ensure its quality? What sets successful developers apart from everyone else with a good idea? Topics will include, but are not limited to: programming, project management, game design, visual design, and case studies from the industry.

This course is designed to introduce students to the multidisciplinary nature of computer game design, with the emphasis on technical skills and group work.

Assessment
Labs: 7%
First game: 11%
Game design: 11%
Game prototyping: 11%
Final presentation:: 6%
Final game 34%
Final examination (2 hours): 20%

Note that the internal assessments may change.

Please note: students wishing to take this course will need to have a strong background in computer programming. If you are interested in taking this paper it is important to apply as early as possible.

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COURSE: MUSI249/349
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite:
MUSI 249: 36 100-level MUSI or PERF points
MUSI 349: 36 200-level MUSI or PERF points

This paper equips singers with scientific knowledge on the voice and demonstrates how to teach safely and effectively. The paper encompasses vocal anatomy and physiology, practical techniques and critical listening.

Assessment
In-class test: 20%
Practical teaching assessments: 40%
Written essay: 40%

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COURSE: HIST230/333
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite:
HIST 230: One 100-level HIST paper or 108 points
HIST 333: 18 200-level HIST or ARTH or ARTV points

This paper examines the extraordinary transformation in family forms in New Zealand from 1830 to today. It asks how and why these changes occurred and considers the role of the law and medicine in shaping these transformations.

Topics considered include the shift from “natural” reproduction to medically-assisted reproduction (“test-tube babies”); childlessness, adoption and whāngai; controlling and enhancing fertility; debates from the dominant Pākehā nuclear family model to same sex and single parent-led families in the 21st century.

Assessment for HIST 230
Assignments (2 × 700 words): 20%
Essay (2,000 words): 30%
Final examination (2 hours): 50%

Assessment for HIST 333
Assignments (2 x 700 words): 20%
Essay (2,500 words): 30%
Oral presentation: 10%
Final examination (2 hours): 40%

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COURSE: COSC326
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: COSC242.

This paper aims to improve and develop programming skills by setting a series of exercises that require an analytical and creative approach to problem solving. Most – but not all – of these exercises will involve programming tasks. Some will not use computers at all; some will use them only for ancillary tasks. Each solution will be assessed against the requirements, and students will be expected to go back and rework each problem until it is completed satisfactorily. Students will be required to test and debug their programmes fully as well as learn to identify inefficiencies.

The main objectives of this course are to develop and foster general skills concerned with computer-related techniques, understanding a problem, problem-solving strategies and working with people. Most of the exercises will require working in pairs or in teams, although some exercises are individual.

Assessment
There are 15 assignments, called etudes, all of which must be successfully completed to pass the course.

This paper involves a considerable commitment of time and energy. Students are therefore discouraged from enrolling in a second paper.

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COURSE: ENGL127
CREDITS: 18 points

Clear, powerful communication is a prerequisite of success in all endeavours. In our digital age more than ever, communication takes place in written forms with speech, gesture, expression or body language providing fewer clues to meaning. ENGL 127 introduces, or refreshes, key concepts in effective written communication. We study practical aspects of grammar, punctuation, style and mechanics at the level of the sentence, paragraph, essay and beyond. We emphasise practical work, teaching skills you can transfer to your own writing projects.

Please note: Students for whom English is a second language should have attained an overall score of 7.0 in IELTS academic band or the equivalent.

Assessment
Summary test: 10%
Prose revision test: 10%
Essay: 10%
Reading journal: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 30%

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COURSE: ENGL223/323
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite:
ENGL 223: One 100-level ENGL paper (excluding ENGL 126) or 36 points
ENGL 323: 18 200-level ENGL points
Open for Interest Only enrolment – lectures and tutorials – with Head of Department permission.

Fantasy seems to have become the pop – or even “pulp” – literary genre of the 21st century, almost sidelining modernist realism. Its ascendency or resurgence has drawn attention to the fact that, in the tradition of European and English-language literature, it is realism that is the anomaly. By way of background to the multi-volume “world-building” adult fantasies, this paper will examine texts illustrating the literary uses of fantasy, chronologically from the most ancient text in English, Beowulf, to the great children’s publishing phenomenon for the present day, Harry Potter.

The texts selected do not so much represent hardcore “genre” fantasy, but fantasy as it manifested in mainstream literature at the time.

Assessment
Concepts and reading test: 20%
Essay (2,000 words for 223 / 3,000 words for 323): 30%
Examination (2 hours for 223 / 3 hours for 323): 50%

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COURSE: FORB201
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 54 points. Open for Interest Only enrolment with Head of Department permission.

Increasingly, forensic investigations have come to rest on the techniques of forensic biology to provide vital evidence in homicides, violent crimes, disaster identification and even minor crimes. This course is designed as an introduction for the student who is interested in analysing biological evidence as it relates to legal and other investigations, or collecting and processing evidence at a crime scene or in a laboratory. Students will have an unequalled opportunity to interact with a range of national and international forensic experts, providing a sense of reality and authority that is unique.

The course provides a strong basis in modern forensic biology techniques. The multidisciplinary nature of forensics depends on the integration of scientific skills within a forensic context, and hence the course includes a wide spectrum of topics.

Assessment
Test: 20%
Assignment: 30%
Final examination (2 hour): 50%

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COURSE: COMP101
CREDITS: 18 points

An introduction to the methods and technologies used to build the information systems that run our modern world. You will learn how data is encoded for computer processing, the basics of algorithms and how machines execute algorithms to process data. In addition, you will learn the fundamental concepts of storing and managing data using relational databases, and how to manipulate these databases using query language. Finally, you will examine contemporary issues in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and discuss how use of ICT impacts on our daily life.

This course should be of interest to any students wanting to gain a stronger understanding of how information is stored and manipulated in computer-based systems.

Assessment
In-class tests (2 × 5% and 1 × 10%): 20%
Assignments (2 × 10%): 20%
Final examination: 60%

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COURSE: MATH151
CREDITS: 18 points

This course on mathematical methods, including calculus and algebraic technique, is suitable for students who wish to take at least a service paper in mathematical methods and do not yet have a background in mathematics sufficiently strong to join MATH 160. Emphasis is placed on understanding via examples, and the methods taught are used to study a variety of practical problems. In the process, students’ manipulation skills in algebra and calculus will improve.

Assessment
Written assignments (x5) and computer tests (x3): 35%
Final examination (2 hours): 65%

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COURSE: COMP160
CREDITS: 18 points

Recommended Preparation: COMP150.

An introduction to the art and craft of computer programming and object-oriented design using Java. A first look at building graphical applications.

If you’re serious about computing, then COMP 160 is the key paper for you. It forms a base from which you can learn other programming languages and techniques. While it is suitable for students enrolled for any degree, it is particularly designed for students taking a BSc, BA or BCom degree.

Assessment
Mid-school test: 15%
Laboratory-based exercises: 25%
Final examination (2 hours): 60%

Students must pass the final examination in order to pass the paper

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COURSE: COMP111
CREDITS: 18 points

This course aims to enhance the capacity of students to benefit from information and communication technologies now and in the future. Students will explore the foundations and applications of Information and Communication Technology and examine its current and future impact on individuals, organisations and society. Students will apply widely used software applications to perform real-world business activities.

Assessment
Blackboard tests: 20%
Practical test: 30%
Final examination (2 hours): 50%

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COURSE: MART308
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 54 200-level points.

An introduction to the practice of integrated digital marketing, including both digital marketing skills and business philosophy, and also a sociological view, including ethical considerations.

This paper is an introduction to integrated digital marketing. The emphasis is placed on digital marketing as a business philosophy, a sociological view of the practice of digital marketing from a consumer viewpoint, consideration of ethical issues, and practical skills and knowledge demanded by employers that will enable graduates to embark on a professional career in the field of marketing.

Assessment
Semester-long project (Mimic Pro simulation): 20%
Online tests (3 x 5%): 15%
Software exercises (3 x 5%): 15%
Final examination: 50%

Students will be unable to pass the course if they do not purchase the required courseware. Available online only and must be purchased, bundled with the online digital marketing software Mimic Pro, currently US$99.

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COURSE: FREN105
CREDITS: 18 points

An introduction to French for students with little or no previous knowledge of the language. The paper takes an integrated approach to the skills of language acquisition, focusing on practical survival skills.

Do you want to learn another language and be able to travel with confidence in more than 30 countries, or add a new skill to your degree? This intensive course engages students in learning the basic vocabulary and structures of French. The teaching methodology is student-centred with the lecturer acting as facilitator and the ultimate goal of this paper is to make the students independent users of French.

In FREN 105, you will gain skills (in listening, speaking, reading and writing) for communicating in French about your life, your friends and family, your studies and your leisure-time activities. You will also be introduced to French and other francophone cultures.

Assessment
Oral test: 10%
In-class tests: 50%
Final examination (2 hours): 40%

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COURSE: LAWS470
CREDITS: 15 points

Pre-requisites: LAWS 201, 202, 203, 204.

This course will examine the origins and fundamental concepts of international criminal law.

Assessment
Research assignment: 30%
Final examination: 70% or 100%

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COURSE: MANT361
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: MANT 101 or BSNS 111 and 36 200-level Commerce points, or MANT 250.

Examines the essential theories and concepts for conducting human resource management practice in different countries and cultures and with teams from multiple locations.

Assessment
Participation: 10%
Mid-term exam: 30%
Group case presentation: 30%
Final written assignment: 30%

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COURSE: MAOR110
CREDITS: 18 points

An introduction to Māori language with emphasis on pronunciation, greetings and forms of language in particular cultural contexts.

In this course students will develop a basic conversational fluency and proficiency in the pronunciation of the Māori language. Students will learn some basic sentence structure patterns, gaining confidence in using these patterns both in writing and in speaking, as well as aural confidence in listening to basic Māori language. This paper assumes no prior knowledge of the Māori language.

This paper assumes no prior knowledge of the Māori language and gives an introduction to the Māori language with the emphasis on pronunciation, greetings and forms of language in particular cultural contexts.

Assessment
Mahi kōrero (listening/oral): 40%
Mahi whakarongo (listening): 20%
Mahi tuhituhi (written): 40%

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COURSE: TOUR214
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 108 points.

This course explores the complex value chain that delivers wine from vineyard to consumer. It provides an introduction to everything from viticulture and winemaking, to the role of intermediaries, wine retail (off-licence) and the hospitality sector (on-licence). Students are also introduced to the role of wine (and wine tourism) in regional development.

The wine industry and wine tourism are becoming increasingly significant aspects of the New Zealand economy. This course provides students with an overview of the diverse nature of the wine business with an emphasis on how wine and tourism intersect. It uses examples from New Zealand and around the world to give you an appreciation of some of the key academic and business concepts behind the wine industry.

A core component is the gaining of skills and knowledge in wine appreciation. Workshops are dedicated to the acquisition of wine tasting skills and to gaining knowledge of a range of wines and aspects of wine marketing from around the world.

A non-compulsory field trip to Central Otago gives students direct exposure to wine making operations and cellar door management. The paper is ideal for those wishing to enter the wine industry, those looking to develop their wine knowledge to use in the business environment, those wishing to learn more about the marketing and sales of symbolic consumer goods, or those with an interest in wine. It is suited to current students and those who wish to return to study.

Assessment
Essay: 20%
Project: 30%
Wine examination: 20%
Final examination (open book): 30%

NOTE: Please be aware that this course has limited places. If you are interested in undertaking this course, CISaustralia recommends that you apply for the program as soon as possible.

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COURSE: JAPA131
CREDITS: 18 points

An introductory course in reading, writing, speaking and listening to Japanese for students with no previous knowledge of the language. The paper takes an integrated approach to the skills of language acquisition and includes basic material on the cultural heritage of the Japanese people.

Now is the time for you to learn Japanese language and culture. The 2020 Tokyo Olympics is predicted to expand job opportunities for Japanese learners and Japan experts. In this course, you will learn how to develop four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) through lots of engaging communicative activities in a relaxed environment.

Note: This paper is for beginners only.

Assessment
Oral: 10%
Tests: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 50%

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COURSE: MFCO231
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 36 100-level points.

This course explores the cultural, ethical and societal effects of disinformation and misinformation. Using case histories from journalists and other media worldwide, and studies from political and social scientists, you will learn to think critically about the information you consume and pass on to others, through both traditional and social media.

You will study, through practical exercises, the shape-shifting nature of news as it circulates around the globe. You will become a better-informed student of information and will examine the proposition that while you are entitled to your own opinions, you are not entitled to your own facts.

Assessment
Reflective social media essay: 50%
Viral story assessment: 30%
Fake news story assessment: 20%

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COURSE: LING103
CREDITS: 18 points

Examination of popular myths from a linguistics perspective. Includes topics such as the origins and nature of language, attitudes toward languages, and language policies. This paper introduces linguistics by critically examining popular misconceptions or “myths” about language.

The paper is divided into three sections. The section on the origins and nature of language considers myths such as whether animals have languages and if invented languages are fake. The section on language attitudes examines myths such as whether English is a killer language and if pidgins and creoles are primitive. The section on language policy and education focuses on myths about language behind language “wars” and if bilingualism slows child development.

Assessment
Class participation: 10%
Optional assignment: 30%
Final examination: 60% or 90%

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COURSE: MATH160
CREDITS: 18 points

This course consists of half algebra and half calculus, and is the main entry point to 100-level mathematics. The course provides the basis for progression to MATH 170 and then to 200-level mathematics as well as an adequate background to support other subjects.

Assessment
Marked assignments (x10): 16.7% (if they help)
Computer skills tests (x5 each in Algebra and Calculus): 33.3%
Final examination (3 hours): 67.7% (or 50%, if assignments help)

To pass terms, a student must gain at least 5/10 in each of the first four skills tests.

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COURSE: PACR101
CREDITS: 18 points

This paper is an introduction to theories of learning and academic skills needed for independent learning and success at university, especially designed for Pacific students new to tertiary study.

Note: No other Summer School paper may be taken concurrently with PACR 101.

Assessment
Written essay outline: 10%
Written essay (1,500 words): 25%
Group project: 25%
Group presentation: 10%
Reflective journal: 10%
Blackboard discussions: 10%
Online self-assessment: 10%

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COURSE: FINC204
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 108 points.

Principles and techniques for handling personal financial decisions. This course will equip you with specialised knowledge across diverse areas including investments, risk management, taxation, estate planning, social security and retirement planning.

This paper aims at providing students with the ability to plan, analyse and evaluate alternatives of personal financial decision. The course commences from the roots of financial planning – “life cycle” theory of consumption and savings. We will delve into the matter of income and expenditure over a lifetime. Then we will learn by doing how to construct a comprehensive personal financial plan.

While building up a financial plan we will incorporate several important blocks such as taxes, use and cost of credit, insurance, savings and investments considerations, and superannuation.

Assessment
Classroom contribution: 5%
In-class quizzes x 3 (15% each): 45%
Group case written report: 20%
Group case presentation: 30%

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COURSE: RELS237/337
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite:
RELS 237: 36 points
RELS 337: 18 200-level RELS or PSYC points

An introduction to the psychology of religion, with emphasis on what research in contemporary cognitive and evolutionary psychology says about human religious belief and behaviour.

Can religious belief and behaviour be explained by science? What does cognitive and evolutionary psychology tell us about belief in god? Is religion universal? Is religion a product of human evolution? How does religious belief develop in childhood? What social functions does religion serve? Combining scholarship on religion and psychology, this paper introduces students to the important interdisciplinary field of psychology of religion.

In addition to the above questions, students will learn about the latest research on the psychology of terrorism, the psychology of atheism and the psychological effects of religion on prejudice/tolerance. No background experience in religion or psychology is required.

Assessment
Reading comprehension quizzes: 20%
Critical response essays: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 40%

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COURSE: POLS321
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 18 200-level POLS points or special permission from the Head of Department.

This paper examines how and why policy decisions are made by the New Zealand government, who they are made for, and how they can be changed.

Why do governments pursue certain courses of action and implement particular sets of policies during specific periods of history? Who makes policy and how? Why does policy matter? What is the relationship between economic and political power? Who runs New Zealand? More generally, how do we understand politics? The overall aim of the paper is for students to understand how and why public policy is made in New Zealand and elsewhere.

Assessment
Reading blogs: 10%
Policy theory essay and presentation: 25%
Critical theory essay: 25%
Policy evaluation: 40%

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COURSE: PHIL106
CREDITS: 18 points

Radical ideas about the human condition. Topics include existentialism, freedom, authenticity, nihilism, feminism, meaning, and modernity. Authors studied include Nietzsche and Sartre.

Assessment
Weekly writing exercise (approx 100 words per week): 10%
Essay (1,000 words): 20%
Essay (1,500 words): 30%
Final examination: 40%

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COURSE: STAT110
CREDITS: 18 points

This course covers descriptive statistics, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, analysis of variance, experimental design, sampling and design principles. The program R will be used throughout the course.

This paper will provide a head start for students wishing to advance in statistics as well as those requiring only the statistical background represented by STAT 110 to proceed in their own disciplines.

Assessment
Online assignment and mastery tests: 33%
Final examination (3 hours): 67%

Grades achieved in the online assignment and mastery tests will count towards the final grade only if this is to the student’s advantage.

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COURSE: PHSI170
CREDITS: 18 points

This course progresses in a largely descriptive way through the essentials of our understanding of the Sun-Earth system and its place in the wider universe. Lecture topics include ancient, classical and modern astronomy, stellar evolution, supernovae, black holes, cosmology and the exploration of the solar system. Special topics will be included, such as the size and age of the universe; the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence; and what the effect would be of a large meteor impact on Earth. The importance of historical aspects and the progressive development of ideas will be emphasised, with a minimum of mathematics. This course is intended for students who have an interest in broad education. We aim to facilitate a continuing interest in astronomy and space exploration.

Assessment
Laboratories and discussion groups: 15%
Essays (2 × 7.5%): 15%
Mid-school test: 10%
Examination (2 hours): 60%

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COURSE: CHEM191
CREDITS: 18 points

An introduction to the concepts of chemistry underlying important processes in biology and human health, including chemical bonding, energetics, kinetics, equilibria and solubility, properties of water and solutions, acids, bases, complexation and electron transfer, mechanisms of organic reactions and properties of amino acids and carbohydrates.

CHEM 191 aims to instill a fundamental knowledge of chemical structure and reactivity, with particular focus on concepts that provide an understanding of why chemical reactions proceed and how this understanding may be applied to the chemical processes in biological systems.

CHEM 191 provides an introduction to concepts influencing chemical reactions in biological systems including:

  • Concepts of Chemical Bonding
  • Thermodynamics/energetics of biological systems
  • Properties of water
  • Reaction rates and chemical equilibria
  • Metals in biology – electron transfer, complexation
  • Organic/carbon-based compounds – stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, functional groups, polymers
  • Biological molecules – carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleic acids, nucleic acids, proteins/enzymes
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COURSE: CLAS240
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 18 CLAS, GREK or LATN points, or 54 points, or Head of Department approval.

A study of the mythology, history, warfare, literature, art, archaeology and culture of ancient Greece and Rome in ancient literary and artistic evidence, and as depicted in movies and on television.

Since the advent of motion-picture technology, filmmaking has drawn upon Classical history and recreated Classical myth to entertain modern audiences. Adapting to a new medium invariably involves changes to the original sources, though some changes result from the decision to focus upon different themes or characters, reflecting modern tastes and revealing our own cultural concerns. This paper examines the use of the original Classical material in modern cinema and television, from the ‘sword-and-sandals’ films of the 1950s to the digitally enhanced Hollywood blockbusters of the 2000s.

Assessment
Essay (2000 words):  20%
In-class test: 20%
Final examination (3 hours): 60%

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COURSE: RELS202/302
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 36 points.

A study of religion relating to archaeological sites, the arts and contemporary culture. Theravada Buddhism is the primary focus of this paper, but the Hindu, Islamic, Chinese and indigenous religious traditions of Southeast Asia are also considered. The paper studies some of the significant archaeological sites of Southeast Asia (Borobudur in Java, Angkor Wat in Cambodia, the Shwedagon in Burma), the association between the arts and religion (trance and spirit possession, Cambodian classical dance, Javanese gamelan and shadow puppet theatre) as well as ritual healing practices and the use of religion – both as a moral force and as the power behind protective devices such as tattoos, amulets and yantras – during times of war.

Assessment
Online tutorial discussion: 20%
Essay (2,500 words): 30%
Examination (two hours): 50%

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COURSE: MATS204
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 54 points.

The broad and complex challenges associated with sustainability of materials are examined in this paper, beginning with national and international principles of sustainability, certification models and assessment tools. It will investigate aspects of product lifecycle as it relates to material selection and use, and the role of the consumer. It will also identify key elements affecting materials such as processing, production, design and end-of-life, and explore alternatives.

Assessment
Oral presentation: 15%
Lifecycle mapping: 25%
Analysis of product sustainability: 60%

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COURSE: POLS308
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 18 200-level POLS points or special permission of the lecturer.

The formulation and implementation of US foreign policy. Institutions, the strategy of containment, and the US role in a post-Cold War world.

Assessment
Essay: 30%
Individual tutorial group essay: 20%
Final examination (2 hours): 50%

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COURSE: MART330
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 54 200-level points.

This paper is intended for students who want to understand how visual methods such as videography can contribute to representing meaning and ideas in narrative form both in the context of social media and ethnography. Understanding how to create visual narratives and how to use them in a variety of contexts will provide students with contemporary skills that are increasingly sought after by business, academic and social agencies. This paper is a project-driven paper for students interested in visual research using filmmaking and storytelling.

Assessment
Tell and show a story: 10%
Film an interview: 20%
Pitch your project: 20%
Film project: 50%

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COURSE: IDRHAA355 / LAAHAA355
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, A

This course explores the principal architects and artists, monuments, and themes from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italian art and architecture. Class time is divided equally between lectures and on-site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be placed on Renaissance architecture in Florence and will also include architectural developments in other Italian towns. Special topics will include architectural theory, the Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. Coursework will focus on important figures such as Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Michelangelo, and Leonardo, in addition to visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence.

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COURSE: GSANCI202 / ISISCI202 / LAAHCI202 / LSSOCI202
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one’s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills.

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COURSE: FTFCSF360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: A, B

This course addresses the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through lab practice gained by running a real enterprise in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Coursework includes site visits to well-known Italian luxury brands in Florence such as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.

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COURSE: FWFCFC340 / LSSOFC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, A, B

This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as “made in Italy” culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism, and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and/or tastings.

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COURSE: HPFBSM330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, A

The front of house area of any restaurant should be carefully planned in order to balance ambiance with function. Restaurant seating, wait stations, and waiting areas are just a few of the areas to consider when planning a restaurant dining room. The course focuses on all aspects that characterize the front of the house experience. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the front of the house to properly reflect the restaurant concept and the necessity of planning front of the house spaces for efficiency. Furthermore, the course considers the pivotal role of excellent customer service and the training methods of front of the house staff. This course features Experiential Learning hours.

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COURSE: ISITIB101
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, 3, 4, A, B

This course develops basic conversation, reading, and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary, and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to express themselves in basic sentences, recognize gender and number in both nouns and adjectives, and begin approaching the Passato Prossimo. Emphasis will be given to the oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before.

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COURSE: BUMKIT320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing or equivalent

This course further develops the main principles of marketing by exploring the strategic implications of marketing in different countries and cultures and identifying specific marketing techniques and the modifications necessary to accommodate cultural differences. Topics include global marketing, marketing planning, segmentation, culture and business customs, political and legal factors and restraints, economic and technological development, and the international monetary system. 

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COURSE: DIPHID180
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: A, B

This course introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. The course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. Assignments, lectures, readings progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of camera functions (manual mode) and processing techniques. The second half of the course will focus on weaving the techniques with specific photographic concepts via assignments. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasise basic camera functions in manual mode. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Must have a manual setting: ability to set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed.

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COURSE: ISITII201
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

Pre-requisites: One semester of Italian language or equivalent. Italian Language Placement Test required.

This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginning-level course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. Upon course completion, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present Conditional and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.

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COURSE: ISITII250
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, 4, A, B

Pre-requisites: Two semesters of Italian language or equivalent. Italian Language Placement Test required.

This level is for those students who already have an active knowledge of elementary language structures (i.e. the expression of past actions and events, discussion of future plans), can communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background, and can understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to use more complex pronouns both in spoken and written Italian and will have a basic grasp of the following topics: Condizionale, Trapassato Prossimo, Pronomi Relativi, Imperativo and a basic grasp of the four tenses of Subjunctive.

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COURSE: ISITHO130
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January

This course concentrates on rapidly developing a basic command of Italian while introducing the student to various aspects of the Italian culture through the hospitality industry. Students will have the opportunity to learn on-site with their instructors through a series of walking tours and visits in Florence to hotels, restaurants, and wine-related establishments. Technical vocabulary will be enhanced and finalized to prepare the student for the hospitality industry. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary, and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. After taking this course, students will be able to express themselves in the Present tense and Passato Prossimo and to use both nouns and adjectives in the correct form with reference to gender and number. No prior knowledge of Italian required, this is a beginner-level course.

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COURSE: FWDNNS350 / SHSSN350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Nutrition or equivalent.

This course is a study of the importance of nutrition in sports and exercise in order to maximize athletic potential and performance. Covered topics include food nutrients, role of water, bioenergetics in exercise and training, heat and fluid regulation during physical activity, weight, and eating behaviors. Students are encouraged to form educated and strategic regimens (exercise and dietary plans) from both scientific and holistic approaches for professional athletes and physically active individuals.

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COURSE: FWFCFF347
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and cultural scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities; encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence’s thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings and visits. This is a Food and Culture course, not a CA/BP lab course. Food labs emphasise the food culture of Italy and are not based on professional cooking techniques.

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COURSE: 201/301/303/375/501/503/575
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

Students explore major cities across Europe using literature and the arts as a guide to understanding the rise and establishment of the urban setting. Through readings and media studies, students examine the artistic process from inspiration to creation. Site visits and guided tours then allow students to experience the historical, geographical, and demographical foundations that inform the fictional representations of European cities and their impact on perceptions of those cities today. Students have the opportunity to learn from and exchange their observations with experts as well as distinguished on-site scholars and local guides in order to frame their own perception of the cities and these cities’ representation through the arts.

This course will explore the rise and the establishment of the urban setting as the nexus of contemporary European culture and civilisation. Literature and the arts will serve as the focal point. The course will concentrate primarily on the late nineteenth-century up to the contemporary setting, more specifically on Rome, Aix-en-Provence/Marseille, Paris, Amsterdam and Prague. Students will explore a variety of media: novel, poetry, cinema and the fine arts.

Courses offered include:

  • European Studies 303: Europe and the Urban Space
  • Anthropology 301: The Artist and the City
  • Literature 375: The European City in Literature
  • Communications 375: The European City in the Visual Arts
  • Geography 201: Europe and its Cities

The syllabus for this program remains the same regardless of which course the student undertakes. As students are visiting the same sites, attending the same lectures, partaking in the same activities, etc. they are learning the same content. The difference is in their assessment pieces. The topic and focus of a student’s assessment pieces will be based on what course they have chosen.

COURSE: 385/585
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

This course provides a university-level competency in the history, literature, art and archaeology of the Greco-Roman World, as well as aspects of the Medieval and Renaissance periods. It cultivates strong analytical and critical thinking skills, and develops students’ ability to synthetise cultural, historical, religious, political and material/visual evidence. The academic content of the seminar is conveyed through an extensive series of on-site lectures and discussions by academic experts in the fields of history, art history and archaeology.

Courses include:

  • Archaeology 385: Greek and Roman Archaeology
  • Art History 385: Ancient and Medieval Classical Art and Architecture
  • Cross Cultural Studies 385: Cultural Identities in Mediterranean Europe
  • History 385: Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean Cultural History
  • Religious Studies 385: From Polytheism to Monotheism, The Early Christian Period in Italy, Greece & France

The syllabus for this program remains the same regardless of which course the student undertakes. As students are visiting the same sites, attending the same lectures, partaking in the same activities, etc. they are learning the same content. The difference is in their assessment pieces. The topic and focus of a student’s assessment pieces will be based on what course they have chosen.

COURSE: 385/585
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

This program provides an introduction to three major dramatic traditions that will be stimulating, challenging and enjoyable. Classes will be primarily discussion. Special emphasis will be placed on close reading, character development, poetry and major themes. Students will also visit key historical sites to better understand the political and intellectual circumstances in which these traditions developed and continue to exist. Special attention will be paid to Shakespeare as a writer for the stage and a man of the theatre, with visits to theatres to hear and see plays, backstage tours, and critical discussions of directorial, design and acting choices.

The program will look at plays as literature on the page, and in performance on stage, as they are meant to be encountered. Students will also visit key historical sites in order to greater understand the political and intellectual circumstances in which these writers were working and in which their successors continue to work.

Courses offered include:

  • Theatre 385
  • Literature 385
  • English 385

The syllabus for this program remains the same regardless of which course the student undertakes. As students are visiting the same sites, attending the same lectures, partaking in the same activities, etc., they are learning the same content. The difference is in their assessment pieces. The topic and focus of a student’s assessment pieces will be based on what course they have chosen.

CREDITS: 20 UK credits / 40 hours face to face in class lecture + tutorial hours

This module provides an opportunity for students to develop a deeper understanding of the history of London and of some of its most celebrated monuments, heritage and historical sites. It offers a pathway for students to study London’s history in greater depth and it internationalises the learning experience. The module puts students in touch with various types of historical artefacts, namely London’s architecture, sculpture, painting and archaeological objects. It explores the past through various types of historical sources and approaches to studying. Students will develop a meaningful awareness of the particular character and challenges of London history through these visual and material sources as well as texts, both factual and fictional. The syllabus will include visits to London’s museums and heritage sites such as Westminster Abbey, the Tower of London and less well-known sites, off the ‘tourist trail’.

This course is a second year module (Level 5 of British system).

Additional fees (£80-£150) go towards the various galleries/museums/cultural houses visited as part of this course.

CREDITS: 20 UK credits / 40 hours face to face in class lecture + tutorial hours

This module focuses on the ways in which non-fiction media such as news, documentary, advertising, lifestyle journalism and popular factual television articulate and explore contemporary experiences of profound social change. It focuses especially on the changing landscape of social class, race and ethnicity and asks how the media engages with these changes and presents them to its publics.

This course is a second year module (Level 5 of British system).

CREDITS: 20 UK credits / 40 hours face to face in class lecture + tutorial hours

Globalisation is a process crossing social boundaries. It also crosses disciplinary divisions. This module is therefore designed to be an introduction to thinking about the new world order where moral, economic, political and ecological issues are intertwined with a debate about the future of society. This is now a vogue topic in both academic and public spheres and a crucially important subject in current sociological debates.

This course is a second year module (Level 5 of British system).

COURSE: MGMT-X 460.394
CREDITS: 4 US credits / Approx. 36 classroom contact hours

The Internet, the digital revolution, and the move toward an information-based economy are dramatically changing business and the way products are marketed and sold. To be more successful in this “new marketing world”, business people need to understand what is changing and how to use the new tools to their optimal advantage. This course is for both veteran marketers who want to understand the new tools available through the Internet, and those who are comfortable with Internet applications and the digital world but want to learn the marketing fundamentals as they apply to the Internet.

COURSE: MGMT-X 497.52
CREDITS: 4 US credits / Approx. 36 classroom contact hours

This course will review the essential factors for turning a great idea into a successful business and explores various benefits and costs of sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and franchises. Topics include market surveys; site analysis; permits and licenses; patents and protection of ideas; risk management; legal requirements and regulations; capital requirements and financing sources; determining the costs and prices of goods and services; advertising and marketing; record keeping; and lines of credit and cash flow requirements.

COURSE: MGMT-X 444.1
CREDITS: 4 US credits / Approx. 36 classroom contact hours

This course provides the basics of Project Management, integrating theories with practical approaches to establish a fundamental knowledge to successfully fulfill projects from start to finish. It provides students with an overview of the operations management environment, relationship among projects, programs and portfolios, project governance framework, organisation structures, and the key role of the project manager from influencing stakeholders to integrating all of the various processes throughout the lifecycle of the project. Throughout this course, students will learn new skills through rich, immersive content taught by world-renowned experts; practice new skills and expertise by working on real-world challenges; and network with peers and experts to solve challenges, expand their network, and grow professionally.

COURSE: MGMT-X 460.961
CREDITS: 4 US credits / Approx. 36 classroom contact hours

Conducting business across cultures is crucial for succeeding in today’s highly competitive marketplace. This highly interactive, simulation-based course provides executives with the knowledge and skills to plan, work, and negotiate in the global marketplace. Topics include cultural differences as they affect international business, understanding hospitality and protocol, establishing trust and credibility, characteristics of a cross-cultural negotiator, concepts of win-win and win-lose, tactics and power strategies, and communication and persuasion strategies.

COURSE: MGMT-X 490.996
CREDITS: 4 US credits / Approx. 36 classroom contact hours

This course is designed to improve interpersonal behaviours and communication skills for those in leadership roles with the goal of improving relationships, productivity, and the quality of work. Topics include a review of basic communication skills: listening, self-disclosure, and methods of expression; more advanced skills: nonverbal communication, influencing behaviours, addressing hidden agendas, and male/female communication in the workplace; conflict management skills; assertiveness; and responding to criticism.

COURSE: MGMT-X 403.31
CREDITS: 4 US credits / Approx. 36 classroom contact hours

With the entertainment industry converging into a worldwide mass media, both business and operation models continue to rapidly evolve. This introductory course for producers, directors, writers, development personnel, and aspiring media executives examines the changing business issues associated with the entertainment industry. Through lectures, discussions with industry guests, and case studies, instruction focuses on current business and production issues, and introduces new business models to navigate content onto new distribution platforms. Some history is highlighted to provide a context for current practices and potential. The course also features opportunities to meet senior entertainment industry executives in various sectors. By the end of the course, students should have an understanding of the opportunities available in the business of entertainment.

COURSE: 395/595
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

This course is designed for students interested in an academically rigorous and cultural experience in Morocco, Gibraltar, Spain and France. The academic component consists of a series of briefings from leading European academic, literary and political personalities and experts on the European relationship with the Islamic world. Participants will attend daily lectures and meetings with distinguished scholars in addition to local guides and experts in the field of politics, art history, history and culture. Special emphasis will be placed on the importance of North African immigration to Europe and its current socio-cultural implications.

Courses offered include:

  • Art History 395: Classical Islam and the European Renaissance
  • Cross Cultural Studies 395: Jews, Muslims and Christians in Europe and the Islamic World
  • French 395: Cultural History of France and the Islamic World
  • History 395: Cultural History of Europe and the Islamic World
  • Political Science 395: European Politics and the Islamic World
  • Religious Studies 395: Jews, Muslims and Christians in Europe and the Islamic World
  • Spanish 395: Cultural History of Spain and the Islamic World

The syllabus for this program remains the same regardless of which course the student undertakes. As students are visiting the same sites, attending the same lectures, partaking in the same activities, etc. they are learning the same content. The difference is in their assessment pieces. The topic and focus of a student’s assessment pieces will be based on what course they have chosen.

COURSE: ICBS302
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

This seminar course will provide an overview of theoretical perspectives, research methods, empirical findings, and practical applications of psychological research on prejudice, stigma, and intergroup relations. Students will better understand psychological principles underlying prejudiced attitudes and discriminatory behaviours, gain a more objective view of their personal beliefs and behaviours, and further develop their ability to critically think about the nature of evidence and arguments from a scientific perspective.

COURSE: ECON320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours + 2 hour final exam

This course provides the conceptual framework that forms the basis for global commerce. Topics include free trade, the flow of goods and services, investments, balance of payment, and the International Monetary System and the foreign exchange markets in the context of alternative international adjustment mechanisms.

COURSE: MRKT301
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

A firm’s promotional efforts focus on developing and managing integrated marketing communications. This course studies the planning and implementation of demand stimulating promotion, i.e., advertising, personal selling, sales promotion and publicity/public relations. Promotion is seen as a key element of the marketing mix which contributes to an organisation’s cohesive marketing strategy.

COURSE: ICSS 306 M01
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

This seminar course considers the ways in which New York has been rebuilt and redefined by people and institutions since the late nineteenth century. Topics include: Wall Street and trusts; Gilded Age politics; water, parks, and mass transportation; apartment houses, tenements, and housing reform; class warfare and the labour movement; fine arts and popular amusements; national mass culture and the 1920s boom; Depression and Fiorello La Guardia; Robert Moses and urban renewal; suburbanisation; the urban crisis; the new immigrants; globalisation and postindustrial reform.

This course aims to establish a strong foundation in basic structures and principles, encouraging further study. Foundational elements include: pronunciation, intonation, basic grammar rules and basic vocabulary. The course blends both traditional materials and methods of instruction with active participation and activities.

This course is for learners who already have some knowledge of French, recent or not. In this course, instructors will make students talk about their field of interest and will quickly use what is said in the class to create the content of the course. Topics of instruction include pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar, all with each student’s abilities and interests in mind.

COURSE: SPN 310
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

This course is based on acquiring the skill of self-correction. Students will acquire higher levels of diction and fluency through the exposure to oral contexts, idiomatic language and the varieties of Spanish spoken in different Spanish speaking nations. This course develops skills in reading, discussion, analysis, self-correction and research. Emphasis is given to pragmatic production and students must be prepared to spend a minimum of 2 extra hours per day for assignments.

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COURSE: SPN 210
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

Prerequisite: SPN 202

This course is for students who already have a high intermediate level of Spanish and wish to better their communicative skills and pronunciation. The emphasis is set on situational everyday conversation and certain cultural issues. The methodology enhances structured speech to provide a firm base in patterns of spoken Spanish with progression towards free conversation.

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COURSE: SPN 304
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

This course is for students with an advanced level of Spanish who wish to learn general information about the development and processes of some of Costa Rica’s main entrepreneurial settings. By the end of the course students will have a general knowledge of business vocabulary and usual business practices in Costa Rica.

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COURSE: SPN 330
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

Prerequisite: SPN 301

Dirigido a estudiantes que hablan español como lengua nativa, pero que necesitan profundizar en el estudio de estructuras gramaticales complejas y enfatizar las destrezas de escucha, escritura y lectura. El objetivo es adquirir las herramientas necesarias para lograr una comunicación eficaz tanto a nivel oral como escrito.

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COURSE: SPN 320
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

Prerequisite: SPN 301

This course introduces relevant topics and issues in the development of Latin America’s cultural heritage. Students will develop an understanding of intellectual, artistic, social and historical perspectives in Latin America with emphasis on Costa Rica.

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COURSE: SPN 301
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

This course is based on grammatical analysis, expansion of vocabulary, idiomatic expressions through readings, and student compositions at a complex level. The objective is for students to acquire a high level of communicative Spanish that will permit them to express their opinions and thoughts concerning and controversial subjects.

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COURSE: SPN 302
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

This course is for students who want to polish their oral and written skills. Students should have a high linguistic level and full knowledge of grammatical structures in order to work on polishing their style. Students will practise narrative constructions, reactions on non-expected contexts, how to report compiled information. The course also covers important aspects about myth, beliefs and other cultural issues in Latin America.

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COURSE: SPN 101
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

This course is an introduction to Spanish for beginners to no previous knowledge of the language is required. Students will develop the basic linguistic skills in order to communicate in common simple situations. The course covers basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, communicative expressions and frequent situations in settings such as restaurants, stores, buses and others. Emphasis is given on understanding, speaking, reading and cross-cultural perspectives.

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COURSE: SPN 102
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

This course is for students who have completed a minimum of 60 contact hours in Spanish studies and already have a command on elementary grammatical tenses. Students will advance in their previous experiential knowledge and further develop their oral, reading, written and listening skills. Students will expand their vocabulary and language usage in order to facilitate interaction with the Costa Rican environment and be able to express themselves in the past.

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COURSE: SPN 201
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

Prerequisite: SPN 102

Students in this course should have a good communicative command of usual everyday situations and a structural command of the present tense. The objective of this course is to develop the student’s skills emphasizing on oral and written presentations and more complex grammatical structures. Students should develop a good command of all past indicative tenses.

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COURSE: SPN 202
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

Prerequisite: SPN 201

This course emphasizes the discourse enrichment on contexts related to description and simple narrations. The contents include vocabulary building and detailed work with the subjective mode and other complex grammatical structures. Students will also learn idiomatic expressions used in Costa Rica.

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COURSE: SPN 340
CREDITS: 5 US credits / 80 hours

Prerequisite: SPN 301

This course focuses on advanced communication and presentation skills. Students will work on communication techniques and efficient oral expressions in formal contexts.

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COURSE: ENV 3044
CREDITS: 15 credit points / 60 contact hours

Students will learn about the interactions between earth and land and how these interactions or processes affect our life and the stability of the planet. Emphasis will be given to the study of the most relevant tropical ecosystems such as: tropical rain forests, cloud forests, coral reefs and mangroves. Field trips to selected environments will provide on-site examples of some of the issues learned through classwork and readings. All field trips are mandatory.

COURSE: ENV 3190J
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 80 contact hours

Prerequisite: General Biology.

This course is aimed to highlight the importance of tropical marine biology to study the biology and the interaction of marine species that we will discovery in the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. Marine ecosystems of the eastern tropical Pacific provide a baseline source for species of high commercial interest in satisfying humans demand for food worldwide. However, numerous marine species are threatened by unsustainable human activities, such as overfishing and habitat destruction. We will develop a critical understanding of concepts and application in Marine Biology, where the students will also be introduced to a wide range of practical activities by visiting field stations and natural laboratories in Costa Rica.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January Session 1

This course is a survey of Japanese popular culture with particular topics covered such as anime manga, fashion, music, art and food. Part of the course will focus on Japanese animation within a historic and popular cultural perspective. Both anime and manga will be examined with particular emphasis on the art, culture and national and international popularity.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January Session 2

Advanced introduction to modern spoken Japanese through aural-oral drills and exercises, and mastery of the basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on the spoken language, although there will also be exposure to enough of the Japanese writing systems to meet practical needs. Practical use and observing of the language will be emphasized.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January Sessions: 1, 2 / July Sessions: 1, 2

Introduction to modern spoken Japanese through aural-oral drills and exercises, and mastery of the basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on the spoken language, although there will also be exposure to enough of the Japanese writing systems to meet practical needs. Practical use and observing of the language will be emphasized.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January Sessions: 1, 2 / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3

Intermediate introduction to modern spoken Japanese through aural-oral drills and exercises, and mastery of the basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on the spoken language, although there will also be exposure to enough of the Japanese writing systems to meet practical needs. Practical use and observing of the language will be emphasized.

CREDITS: 3 North American credits / 39 lecture hours + excursions

This immersive course is comprised of 2 Modules and offers a powerful understanding of how to successfully manage a service business with practical, hands-on training in writing and presentations. The objective of this program is to introduce students to service management concepts and literature to build their abilities to improve service in any business setting. Since communication is a key component of service delivery, significant time is spent learning and practicing spoken and written communication.

Module 1: Business Communications
Student’s capabilities in written communication, oral presentation and non-verbal communication are developed and enhanced within a business and management context. Report and technical writing, presentation preparation, public speaking, business etiquette, negotiation skills, time management and inter-personal communication skills are among the topics emphasised. The IWIBM integrates business communications with service management and students will make presentations on the core business challenges discussed in service management.

Module 2: Service Management
This module helps students to understand how service organisations can best design themselves for effective and professional customer service. Company visits and guest speakers are arranged to help students better understand the theories.

Cultural activities include team building, sightseeing tour and a ski trip to Mt. Washington Alpine Resort. The aim is to help students become familiar with Canadian culture and society, enhance their social communication skills, experience service in the hospitality sector first-hand, apply what they learn in class to everyday life, and enjoy Vancouver Island.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, 3

Advanced introduction to modern spoken Japanese through aural-oral drills and exercises, and mastery of the basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on the spoken language, although there will also be exposure to enough of the Japanese writing systems to meet practical needs. Practical use and observing of the language will be emphasised. The method of instruction will be a communicative approach, Proficiency Method, Direct Method, Jorden Method, TPR, VTS, etc. More advanced students will focus on reading Japanese newspapers and understanding other media outlets. There should be a minimum of four students per level per session in order to offer each level in each session.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 2, 3

Introduction to modern spoken Japanese through aural-oral drills and exercises, and mastery of the basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on the spoken language, although there will also be exposure to enough of the Japanese writing systems to meet practical needs. Practical use and observing of the language will be emphasised. The method of instruction will be a communicative approach, Proficiency Method, Direct Method, Jorden Method, TPR, VTS, etc. There should be a minimum of four students per level per session in order to offer each level in each session.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 2, 3

Intermediate introduction to modern spoken Japanese through aural-oral drills and exercises, and mastery of the basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on the spoken language, although there will also be exposure to enough of the Japanese writing systems to meet practical needs. Practical use and observing of the language will be emphasised. The method of instruction will be a communicative approach, Proficiency Method, Direct Method, Jorden Method, TPR, VTS, etc. There should be a minimum of four students per level per session in order to offer each level in each session.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January Session 2

Advanced introduction to modern spoken Japanese through aural-oral drills and exercises, and mastery of the basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on the spoken language, although there will also be exposure to enough of the Japanese writing systems to meet practical needs. Practical use and observing of the language will be emphasized.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January Sessions: 1, 2 / July Sessions: 1, 2

Introduction to modern spoken Japanese through aural-oral drills and exercises, and mastery of the basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on the spoken language, although there will also be exposure to enough of the Japanese writing systems to meet practical needs. Practical use and observing of the language will be emphasized.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January Sessions: 1, 2 / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3

Intermediate introduction to modern spoken Japanese through aural-oral drills and exercises, and mastery of the basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on the spoken language, although there will also be exposure to enough of the Japanese writing systems to meet practical needs. Practical use and observing of the language will be emphasized.

COURSE: ICCU 201
CREDITS: 4 Thai credits

Introduction to Southeast Asia (SEA) and its extraordinary diversity through the humanities, the arts and social sciences. Emphasis on the intellectual and practical challenges linked to modernisation and development. Study of the ways SEA-member states cope with the social, cultural, economic, political and religious issues brought about by globalisation.

CREDITS: 4 Thai credits

This course provides an overview of the environment, concepts, basic differences, and practices involved in international trade and marketing. Topics include international trade theory and policy, export and import, global logistics management, digital marketing, global marketing strategies, and global strategic management.

COURSE: ICML 160
CREDITS: 4 Thai credits

Provides vocabulary and structures for everyday use and introduces basic aspects of Thai culture. After successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Handle basic communicative situations such as asking for and giving directions, ordering food and risks, asking for prices and bargaining, and buying tickets
  2. Understand the importance of rice farming and ceremonies involving growing rice and Buddhism in daily life
COURSE: IB 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

The focus of this course is the study of the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial start-up process. Areas of concentration include the search for new venture opportunities, evaluation of the viability and attractiveness of the new venture; determining the resources required and the sources of those resources; preparation of financial statements addressing cash flow, valuation and investment justifications; and the development of a business plan appropriate for presentation to funding sources.

The course is also designed to be an experiential learning experience. During the course, students will work in teams to to design and test a business venture of their choosing, by applying the concepts learnt in class and tackling the challenges they encounter. This course may appeal to business and non-business majors alike, as well as to individuals who want to launch their own business in the future, pursue employment in the start-up world, or work in venture capital or entrepreneurial support.

COURSE: SPAN C1
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course is geared towards students who have a grasp of the four basic language skills – speaking, listening, reading, and writing – and augment their knowledge of the world’s Hispanic peoples and their cultures. Building on the foundation of previous Spanish study or direct experience with the language, this course is designed for those who have already achieved an intermediate mastery.

COURSE: ARCH 301
CREDITS: 3 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

This course takes an analytical look at the present-day cosmopolitan city of Barcelona politically, economically and socially and looks back through over 2000 years of history to see how it has taken shape. This course will reflect on the definitive events in the history of Barcelona and how they have shaped today’s society. Special attention will be focused on its urban development and its reflection in how we interact with the city today. We will determine which historical events most impacted the transformation of this Catalan capital city’s physical, architectural and cultural heritage, and discuss the importance of its location in the Mediterranean.

COURSE: MG 315
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1

No other institutions have permeated multiple cultures more than the multinational corporations like IBM, Microsoft, Nestle, BASF, etc. With this permeation, managers from many different cultures are relocated to new and alien cultures. More and more decisions made by future global managers will need to be assessed in terms of an understanding of the multiple cultures the decisions will affect. Future global managers can only do this by knowing how different cultural business ethics are derived, tested, and used. This course has as its purpose the introductory exploration of business ethics in a cross-cultural setting. This can no better be achieved than in a foreign culture where the students can immediately receive information from their surroundings and managers who have had to face the difficult decisions in the past.

COURSE: SPAN 350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July: Session 1 and 2

Why are Spaniards currently exhuming mass graves of the Civil War? How can the country tolerate an unemployment rate of 20 percent? Why has Catalan and Basque nationalism dominated politics for decades? Why does a country with a historic reputation for machismo boast such progressive laws on gender and gay marriages? Why does political corruption remain so prevalent? This course examines political and social issues relevant to Spaniards today. It begins by discussing recent history in order to contextualize the major themes of the past few decades. It then moves to those subjects that emerged out of the transition to democracy – regionalism, terrorism, and linguistic pluralism – and still account for many of the peculiarities of Spanish politics. The second half of the course analyzes “Spain’s Second Transition” under José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero by focusing on immigration, Islamic fundamentalism, foreign policy, gender and family relations, historical memory, political corruption, and the economic crisis. The course is multi-disciplinary, consisting of a mixture of readings from political science, history, and cultural studies. Each session will consist of a lecture and a class discussion.

COURSE: PSY 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Psychology has conventionally situated itself as universally applicable science, however, it can be described as a “modernist” and European-American phenomenon. This course explores the cultural aspects of psychology, examining how biology, psychology, and culture interact in the context of contemporary Spanish and North American societies. One of the key contributions of cultural psychology is thematizing the different filters that moderate how psychological phenomena are understood. These filters, which operate at both conceptual and epistemological levels in large part circumscribe how psychology is studied and applied. This course will provide a conceptual foundation for the understanding of psychology and culture, with a focus on human development, the self, intergroup relations, and cross-cultural communication. The study abroad experience will be used to experientially examine and apply the material covered in class. Finally, wider application of the material in the context of mental health and its care will be explored.

COURSE: ART 310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course will teach students how the camera can be used in a foreign environment as an exciting tool of documentary record, cross-cultural understanding, artistic expression and self-discovery. After an introduction to the fundamentals of photography, both traditional and digital, students will be given several practical assignments to photograph the city of Barcelona itself, its architecture, history, people, and rich culture. As they acquire new technical, compositional and critical skills throughout the course, students will create a portfolio of images that will both showcase and celebrate their unforgettable study abroad experience.

Course load will include class lectures and technique-based lessons held in the classroom, combined with practice sessions in specific outdoor sites. Students will be introduced in class to the history of photography and various photographic genres such as photo-journalism, portraiture or street photography, through the work of well-known classic and contemporary photographers. Other activities include several field trips to visit photo exhibitions in art galleries and museums in the city of Barcelona.

Throughout the course, students will frequently participate in group critiques and individual reviews of their work. They will be required to actively involve themselves in analysing and evaluating their own work and the work of others, in a collaborative atmosphere of constructive reflection and criticism.

A digital camera SLR or a simple Point & Shoot is required. Students could use a traditional camera (film), but this will require an additional effort from their part.

No prior training in photography is required.

COURSE: SPAN A1
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

After completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Produce simple sentences
  • Ask and answer questions about him/herself, about others, and about things s/he has or needs
  • Produce simple statements concerning his/her needs or usual subjects and to answer questions of this type when they are directed to him/her
  • Use culturally appropriate non-verbal communication
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course will examine various aspects of the relationship between food, culture and society in the Mediterranean basin, where eating is not a simple act of survival but rather a cultural and social activity. Looking at the local culture through the lens of food allows us to discover and understand social constructs, values and even the history of Europe, from ancient Greece to the great chefs of the 21st century such as Ferran Adrià. Through this we will discover the similarities and differences between how the Spanish, Italian and Greece societies work.

In this course we offer a cross-cultural perspective that will focus on history, anthropology, sociology, literature, gastronomy and the business that works behind the food industry.

CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 2

Students will examine the process of European political and economic integration, from its first steps in the 1950s until today. The course offers an overview to the key dimensions that help understand what the European Union project is, how it works and why and how it was created. Particular attention is paid to EU migration and border dynamics and their interaction with ongoing debates about European identity and the rise of xenophobic and Islamophobic discourses across Europe. With a strong emphasis in current theoretical debates ongoing in the fields of political geography and population geography current demographic challenges and ongoing geopolitical disputes (within the EU and between the EU and its neighbourhood) will be scrutinised.

COURSE: AH 340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course will provide a foundation in some of the most relevant Avant-garde movements of the 20th century in Western art, such as Cubism and Surrealism, through the thorough study of the lives, ideas, and artistic contributions of three great masters of Spanish art: Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, and Salvador Dalí. While examining exemplary artworks in several mediums of these three artists, and some of their contemporary European counterparts, the course will explore how Avant-garde movements were synonymous with progress, social disruption and change, and how Avant-garde artists contributed to widen the notion of culture and push the boundaries of what traditionally had been considered art. The course will also examine the level of interaction between international artists, writers, and thinkers, and the mobility of artistic ideas across Europe and the USA.

Lectures will be illustrated with presentations of many significant artworks and will integrate readings relevant to the various artists and concepts under discussion. In addition there will be several guided visits to the National Museum of Catalan Art, the Picasso Museum, the Miró Foundation and the Dalí Theatre-Museum in Figueres, which will aid students to get into direct contact with art.

COURSE: SPAN B1
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

After completion of this course, the student will able to:

  • Tell detailed accounts that occurred in the past
  • Understand the main ideas in semi-complex Spanish debates
  • Justify an opinion in informal debates
  • Ask for specific information, complain, ask for an explanation
  • Give detailed instructions about how to do something
COURSE: MK 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 2

International marketing is more than a simple application of marketing principles to more than one country. In a world that becomes increasingly globalised, marketing strategies become absolutely essential. Both global and international marketing are attached to each other. On one hand, international marketing involves the firm in making one or more marketing mix decisions across national boundaries. On the other hand, global marketing involves the firm in establishing manufacturing facilities overseas and coordinating marketing strategies across the globe. Cross-cultural differences have an important role in both internal and external ways.

This course provides the knowledge of the fundamental concepts of international marketing from a European perspective. It is organised so that each class is either a lecture or a case discussion. In this course you will learn to look at international marketing problems through the lens of an analytical framework.

COURSE: MG 310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July: Session 1

The focus of this course is the analysis of how a business must adapt to different cultural contexts. For this purpose, we study the interaction between the culture and the company’s structure, processes and human resources. In this way, the student will be able to understand strategies used to optimise such interaction. The general objective of the course is to learn the main business practices in different cultures, through the analysis of the differences in various countries. This will provide the background to understand and identify threats and opportunities to do business in a global context.

COURSE: IS 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course will examine various aspects of the relationship between sport and society in Spain, with a particular emphasis on sports with a long tradition in Catalonia. We will examine both the impact of sport on Spanish society and the influence of society on the practice of sport in Spain. The course begins with a consideration of general theoretical questions in the study of sport before moving on to an account of the historical development of sports in Spain in general and in Catalonia in particular. We also examine the reciprocal influences of sport violence, gender, race and ethnic and national identities in Spain.

COURSE: IB 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The focus of this course is the study of the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial start-up process. Areas of concentration include the search for new venture opportunities, evaluation of the viability and attractiveness of the new venture; determining the resources required and the sources of those resources; preparation of financial statements addressing cash flow, valuation and investment justifications; and the development of a business plan appropriate for presentation to funding sources.

The course is also designed to be an experiential learning experience. During the course, students will work in teams to to design and test a business venture of their choosing, by applying the concepts learnt in class and tackling the challenges they encounter. This course may appeal to business and non-business majors alike, as well as to individuals who want to launch their own business in the future, pursue employment in the start-up world, or work in venture capital or entrepreneurial support.

CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1

This course examines the main political and socio-economic processes that help understand present-day Barcelona, particularly after the 1992 Olympics turned it into a vibrant global city. Through the lens of politics, human geography and history, students will explore topics like massive tourism, gentrification, environmental sustainability, the real state bubble, or immigration dynamics. Special attention will be paid to the tense power relations between Catalonia and Spain, the political heritage of Franco’s fascist dictatorship and the rise of the Catalan independence movement.

COURSE: SPAN A2
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

After completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Use frequent polite structures, speak in short social exchanges, describe what s/he does at work or in his/her leisure time, arrange an appointment
  • Ask for information in different situations (in shops, banks, travel agencies…)
  • Describe personal experiences in the past. Describe objects and places
  • Explain what s/he likes or prefers
COURSE: SPAN B2
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

After completion of this course, the student will able to:

  • Tell detailed accounts of events that occurred in the past
  • Speak in detail about future and possible future events
  • Argue and communicate effectively in a speech
  • Explain his/her point of view about current issues arguing all of the points and counterpoints
COURSE: COM FT 590
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM FT 201).

From TV shows to feature films and webisodes, 2D animation is more popular than ever, but how is it created? This fun yet intensive beginner course teaches all the fundamental skills needed to create great 2D character animation – the way it’s done in the industry. Through progressive hands-on lessons you will learn basic drawing and how to use Adobe Animate CC to make characters walk, talk and come to life. We cover animation storytelling, character design, acting, timing, and facial expressions; how to animate “keys and in-betweens,” compose scenes, use color, and more. Animation history and industry trends are also discussed. Students complete numerous projects including a fully produced animated short film. Many of the skills covered in this class can also be used by filmmakers, 3D animators, broadcast designers, and artists.

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COURSE: MET SO 501
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Sociology. A socio-cultural history of Boston’s North End that examines changes in the area from the first Puritan settlement to the current period of gentrification, with central attention given to the dynamics of culture change among the Italian immigrants. Covers the impact of global changes on local processes, changes in American notions of identity and inclusion, and ethnic succession and competition; religious change, social organization, and Catholic festivals; William Foote Whyte’s “Street Corner Society”; myths and realities of “the Mafia” and impact of urban decline and drug violence in the North End in the 70s and 80s; tourism, food marketing, and gentrification. Course includes two visits to the North End, including dinner in a North End restaurant on the final night of the course.

There is an additional USD $100 fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS PS 371
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Attention to the wide range of ways in which personality may become disordered, and emphasis on normal behavior development as highlighted by psychopathology. Evidence and theories concerning problems of treatment are also considered.

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COURSE: CAS WR 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS WR 097 or CAS WR 111) or placement test results.

Emphasis on critical reading and analytical writing in response to various theme-based texts. Review of grammar and mechanics in context. Intensive practice in the patterns of academic argumentation through multiple writing assignments of increasing complexity. Refinement of speaking skills through discussions and oral presentations.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: SED RS 620
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Overview of the foundations and techniques for conducting action research. Encourages the development of an inquiry stance within the practice of teachers, principals, and other school-based practitioners. Students engage in planning, collecting, and analyzing data through an action research project.

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COURSE: SED DS 502
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Develops important understandings of cognitive, social-emotional, and identity developing during adolescence, as well as the role that educators can play in fostering the mindsets, skillsets, character strengths and contexts that adolescents need to grow into healthy and high-performing adults.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Social Inquiry I.

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COURSE: CAS MA 411
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: ((CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230) & (CAS MA 242 or CAS MA 442)).

Extends concepts and techniques of calculus and develops further applications. Topics include higher dimensional calculus, applications of vector analysis, uniform convergence of series, complex series, improper integrals, gamma and beta functions, Stirling’s formula, Fourier series and transform.

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COURSE: CFA AR 431
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: previous drawing experience.

Emphasizes figure drawing; further develops drawing skills. Using various media, students work from the nude model, draped figure, and objects to develop a personal expression.

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COURSE: QST IS 467
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST IS 223). Junior standing.

Designed to provide students with an overview of Agile Development methodologies. Introduces the various methods currently used in the industry and then focuses on the primary methodologies used today, SCRUM and Kanban. Students learn the tools of these software development approaches that produce deliverables to end users every two to four weeks, and analyze the value each of these methodologies brings into the development process and the reasoning behind a corporation selecting one method over the other (or a combination of both). In addition, students are introduced to CA Project Management software, the leader in the industry for SCRUM. Students learn to analyze requirements, create backlogs, schedule “stories” to be developed, hold Standup meetings, Reviews and Retrospectives.

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COURSE: CAS CS 565
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 112 & CAS CS 330) and familiarity with linear algebra, probability, and statistics.

Introduction to data mining concepts and techniques. Topics include association and correlation discovery, classification and clustering of large datasets, outlier detection. Emphasis on the algorithmic aspects as well as the application of mining in real-world problems.

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COURSE: CAS SO 205
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines the family as a historically and geographically contingent social construction. How families in the U.S. are organized. Considers diverse family formations and intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the operation of family dynamics and politics.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS EN 533
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A survey of American literature from its (contested) beginnings through the mid-nineteenth century. Focuses on fiction, poetry, and autobiography from major authors (including Melville, Hawthorne, Dickinson, Whitman, Douglass, and Thoreau). Also briefly encounters other genres such as sermons, essays, and exploration narratives. Among our lines of inquiry are these: How do political and philosophical questions shape literary forms and styles (and vice-versa)? How do authors write themselves into (and out of) literary traditions, particularly in matters of influence? And how do the roots (and routes) of early American literature continue on in twentieth- and twenty-first-century U.S. literature?

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COURSE: CAS SO 352 / CAS WS 352
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Considers the biological and social organization of masculinities; the ways culture reproduces/articulates masculinities, particularly with regard to race and class; how masculine identities are expressed; male privilege; alternative masculinities; and what is at stake in negotiating contemporary masculinities.

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COURSE: SED DE 570
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introductory course that provides non-native signers an opportunity to study American Sign Language as a foreign second language. Emphasizes developing receptive skills. An introduction to Deaf culture is presented through instruction and activities.

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COURSE: SED DE 571
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SED DE 570).

This course expands on the introduction to American Sign Language (ASL) and Deaf culture, focusing on frequently used signs, basic rules of grammar, non- manual aspects of ASL, fingerspelling, and cultural features of the Deaf community.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Individual in Community, Oral and/or Signed Communication.

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COURSE: CAS MA 416
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 116 or CAS MA 214) or equivalent.

Fundamental concepts and analytical skills in analysis of variance, including crossed and nested designs, as well as fixed- and random- effect models. Trend analysis for repeated measures, expected mean squares, and non- parametric techniques. SAS is used throughout the course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 407
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 107).

Ethological approach to animal behavior; physiological, ontogenic, and phylogenic causes; and adaptive significance of behavior examined within an evolutionary framework, minimally including humans. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CS 591
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 112) or consent of instructor.

Topics in Computer Science. Introduction to application creation, written in Javascript, using the MEAN stack as examined from theoretical and practical perspectives. Culminating in a final session-long programming project.

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COURSE: CAS MA 294
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 293) or consent of instructor.

Abstract algebra and its applications to combinatorics. A first exposure to groups, rings, and fields via significant combinatorial applications.

Students who have already received credit for MA 541 or MA 542 may not subsequently receive credit for MA 294.

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COURSE: SED LS 565
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to contemporary linguistics, including phonological and syntactical theory, sociolinguistics, first- and second-language acquisition, and discourse theory. Also covers applications of various branches of linguistics to education, including issues of different cultures in the classroom, the role of language in education, and the development of literacy.

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COURSE: CAS MA 119
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Applications of mathematics for personal financial decision-making. Systems of equations, exponential functions, logarithms, probability, descriptive statistics, and numerical simulation, for modeling saving, borrowing, inflation, purchasing power, taxation, government benefits, risk management, insurance, annuities, and investments.

Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I. This course also fulfills the learning outcomes for Life Skills.

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COURSE: SED LS 610
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Practical training in teaching pronunciation to improve mutual intelligibility: the ability of English language learners to understand and be understood by others. Pronunciation training is integrated within a framework of current research and latest practices.

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COURSE: SED CE 630
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Focuses on the scientific study of psychological aspects of living a fulfilling and flourishing life. Topics include happiness, empathy, optimism, friendship, goal setting, achievement, emotion, creativity, humor, and mindfulness. Students become familiar with theory and research in this relatively new subfield and critically consider applications to their teaching, coaching, leadership, and/or counseling.

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COURSE: CAS MA 214
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 213) or consent of instructor.

Inference about proportions, goodness of fit, student’s t-distribution, tests for normality; two-sample comparisons, regression and correlation, tests for linearity and outliers, residual analysis, contingency tables, analysis of variance.

Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 116, MA 214, or MA 614. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: SED ME 525
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Introduces students to the theory and practice of assessment in mathematics. This course prepares teachers to apply research-supported assessment techniques in their classrooms. Discussions about important issues in assessment of students’ mathematical learning is encouraged.

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COURSE: QST AC 565
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq or Coreq: (QST AC 348).

Introduces the basic concepts underlying auditing and assurance services (including materiality, audit risk, and evidence) and demonstrates how to apply these concepts to audit and assurance services through financial statement audits.

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COURSE: COM JO 305
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Students learn the fundamentals of digital photography, from the basics of image capture to processing finished photographs and introduction to their use in digital media. No previous experience in photography is required.

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COURSE: CAS MA 213
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: good background in high school algebra.

Elementary treatment of probability densities, means, variances, correlation, independence, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals, and p-values. Stresses understanding and theoretical manipulation of statistical concepts.

Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: CAS EC 323
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

Introduction to a new field in economics that challenges the traditional model of rational decision-making and uses research in psychology to construct alternative models. Covers the theory of choice under certainty, uncertainty, and temptation; biases in judgment; social preferences.

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COURSE: CAS CH 421 / CAS BI 421
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 204 or CAS CH 212 or CAS CH 214) or equivalent.

Introductory biochemistry. Protein structure and folding, enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and allostery; nucleic acid structure; macromolecular biosynthesis with emphasis on specificity and fidelity; lipids and membrane structure; vitamins and coenzymes; introduction to intermediary metabolism. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 423
CREDITS: 3 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 204 or CAS CH 212 or CAS CH 214) or equivalent.

Introductory biochemistry. Protein structure and folding, enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and allostery; nucleic acid structure; macromolecular biosynthesis with emphasis on specificity and fidelity; lipids and membrane structure; vitamins and coenzymes; introduction to intermediary metabolism.

Not acceptable for credit toward the chemistry major or minor. For students who do not require laboratory credit.

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COURSE: CAS BI 107
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

For students who plan to major in the natural sciences or environmental science, and for premedical students. Required for biology majors. No prerequisite. High school biology is assumed. The evolution and diversity of life; principles of ecology; behavioral biology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking, Research and Information Literacy.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 108
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

For students planning to major in the natural sciences and for premedical students. Required for biology majors. It is strongly recommended students complete CAS CH 101 (or equivalent) before this course. High school biology is assumed. Cell and molecular biology, Mendelian & molecular genetics, physiology, and neurobiology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking, Teamwork/Collaboration.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 525 / CAS NE 525
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS NE 102 or CAS BI 203) and (CAS NE 203 or CAS BI 325).

An in- depth look at molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and their impact and relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment. Topics include the molecular pathways of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Creutzfeldt- Jacob Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 551
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 203 or CAS BI 206) , or consent of instructor.

Views on stem cell research range from assumptions of a potential cure for most diseases to fears that it will depreciate the value of human life. This course equips students with the science that underlies this discussion, including the biological properties of stem cells and the experimental hurdles to utilization in regenerative medicine. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS PO 300 / CAS WS 304
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in American Politics. This course delves into the world of Black Widows and Demon Lovers. Using empirical research, case studies, and drama, the course separates fact from fiction to examine gender and its intersections between recruitment, motivations, and conditions under which women behave violently.

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COURSE: CAS EN 323
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS EN 322).

Overview of English literature between 1700 and 1900. Topics include London as urban center, modern prose fiction, Romantic and Victorian poetry, tensions between religion and science. Authors may include Pope, Swift, Wordsworth, Austen, Dickens, Tennyson, and Wilde.

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COURSE: CAS RN 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A historical and critical introduction to the major themes of Buddhist thought and practice in India and Southeast Asia, with special attention to the transmission of Buddhism to Tibet and the modern West.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: MET AD 571
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (MET AD 100 Pre-Analytics Laboratory).

Presents fundamental knowledge and skills for applying business analytics to managerial decision making in corporate environments. Topics include descriptive analytics (techniques for categorizing, characterizing, consolidation, and classifying data for conversion into useful information for the purposes of understanding and analyzing business performance); predictive analytics (techniques for detection of hidden patterns in large quantities of data to segment and group data into coherent sets in order to predict behavior and trends); and prescriptive analytics (techniques for identification of best alternatives for maximizing or minimizing business objectives). Students learn how to use data effectively to drive rapid, precise, and profitable analytics-based decisions. The framework of using interlinked data-inputs, analytics models, and decision-support tools are applied within a proprietary business analytics shell and demonstrated with examples from different functional areas of the enterprise.

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COURSE: MET MG 310
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Organization and techniques for effective verbal and written communication in the business environment. Emphasis on developing communication skills through practical written and oral assignments.

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COURSE: MET AD 501
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Techniques for effective written and verbal communications. This course is a special offering for students for whom English is a second language.

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COURSE: MET MG 530
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Policy problems of business organizations. Integrates the areas of marketing, finance, accounting, economics, and personnel into a managerial concept of business decision making.

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COURSE: QST SM 131
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: Open to Questrom students and required of all Questrom 1st-semester freshmen. Open to non-Questrom students who have completed at least onesemester of full-time coursework on the CRC. Required of all Questrom first-year students.

Explores the ethical problems facing global management. Through identification and discussion of the substantive disciplines relevant to business, students uncover a complicated analysis necessary to make appropriate decisions and highlight their interdependencies. Stresses written and oral communication skills and logical reasoning as an ingredient for sound analysis and rational business planning.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Ethical Reasoning.

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COURSE: CAS MA 123
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Limits; derivatives; differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions. Applications to maxima, minima, and convexity of functions. The definite integral; the fundamental theorem of integral calculus.

Students may receive credit for either CAS MA 121 or 123, but not both. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS MA 124
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123).

Logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions. Sequences and series; Taylor’s series with the remainder. Methods of integration. Calculus I and II together constitute an introduction to calculus of a function of a single real variable.

Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 122, MA 124, MA 127, or MA 129. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS MA 121
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Differentiation and integration of functions of one variable. Same topics as CAS MA 123, but with less emphasis on mathematical generality and more on applications. Especially suitable for students concentrating in the biological and social sciences.

Students may receive credit for either CAS MA 121 or 123, but not both. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS MA 122
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123). Continuation of CAS MA 121.

Review of univariate calculus, calculus of the elementary transcendental functions, elementary differential equations, elementary multivariate calculus. Applications to exponential growth, optimization, equilibrium, and dynamic modeling problems.

Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 122, MA 124, MA 127, or MA 129. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS BI 203
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 108 & CAS CH 102) or equivalent. Coreq: (CAS CH 203) or equivalent.

Principles of cellular organization and function: biological molecules, flow of genetic information, membranes and subcellular organelles, and cell regulation. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

Students may receive credit for CAS BI 203 or 213, but not both.

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COURSE: CFA MP 130
CREDITS: 1 US credit
OFFERED: Session 2

Intended for all students. Provides an introduction to fundamentals of singing. No previous experience is necessary to enroll.

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COURSE: SED CT 534
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course is designed to support middle and secondary teachers in developing a practical, effective and low-stress approach to classroom management. The course focuses on a classroom management system with four components: classroom structure, limit-setting, responsibility training, and back-up systems. Participants will develop effective classroom management practices, break current “high cost” and ineffective strategies, and establish a proactive, positive classroom setting that maximizes time on learning and minimizes classroom disruptions.

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COURSE: SED SE 534
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Designed to develop an understanding of the theoretical basis and implementation strategies of effective classroom and behavior management for students with and without disabilities. Positive behavioral intervention and supports (PBIS) is used as the overarching framework for school-wide, classroom, and individualized approaches that are used to build and maintain environments that provide positive and pro-active behavioral supports for all learners.

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COURSE: CAS CS 131
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Representation, analysis, techniques, and principles for manipulation of basic combinatoric structures used in computer science. Rigorous reasoning is emphasized.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: QST MK 469
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST MK 323).

Marketing communication strategy has moved beyond advertising to include interactive marketing, sales promotions, direct marketing, public relations, and more. This course focuses on developing a marketing communication strategy that integrates these tools for more efficient and effective communication. Topics include the establishment of objectives based on a situation analysis, developing subsequent messages, creative and media strategies, effectiveness testing, and client/agency relationships.

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COURSE: CAS MA 412
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230).

Basic concepts, results, and applications of complex analysis. Emphasis on computation and applications. Complex plane and functions, differentiability, Cauchy-Riemann conditions, contour integrals, Cauchy formulas, complex series, residue calculus, applications. Extends the concepts of the calculus to the complex setting.

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COURSE: QST FE 459
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323) and (CAS CS 108 or CAS CS 111) and (QST FE 445, recommended).

Teaches students how to use computational techniques to implement financial algorithms for security pricing and risk analysis, including bonds, stocks, and options. This will be a rigorous, hands-on programming course to prepare students for quantitative jobs in finance. The overall objective of the course is to enhance the students’ understanding of the well-known financial models used to price securities including bonds and options and to evaluate the risk and return characteristics of stocks and portfolios. After the course, students will have a deeper understanding of investment portfolios, risk management techniques that use derivatives, and arbitrage strategies. Additionally, students will become comfortable with a modern programming language based on functional and object-oriented programming which will enhance their job opportunities in a variety of fields beyond finance.

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COURSE: CAS CS 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 112).

Fundamental concepts of computer systems and systems programming. Hardware fundamentals including digital logic, memory systems, processor design, buses, I/O subsystems, data representations, computer arithmetic, and instruction-set architecture. Software concepts including assembly language programming, operating systems, assemblers, linkers, and systems programming in C. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: MET CS 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

For students with no previous experience with computers. Organization and function of computer systems; application of computers in today’s society; social impact of computers. Introduction to algorithms, various types of application packages, and the Internet. Not for computer science majors.

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COURSE: CAS CS 320
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 131 and CAS CS 210).

Concepts involved in the design of programming languages. Bindings, argument transmission, and control structures. Environments: compile-time, load-time, and run-time. Interpreters.

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COURSE: CAS IR 501 / CAS PO 554
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: junior standing or consent of instructor.

Investigates patterns of conflict and cooperation in South and East Asia surrounding issues ranging from water resources and health to borders and war. Analyzes how such issues contribute to instability in the region, as well as methods of cooperation.

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COURSE: CAS AH 393
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Explores the terms of debate, key figures, and primary sites for the production and reception of contemporary art on a global scale since 1980. Painting, installation art, new media, performance, art criticism, and curatorial practice are discussed.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

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COURSE: COM CM 313
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM CM 215 or COM CM 301).

Explores the trends and issues affecting corporations, crisis management, public affairs communication, consumer affairs, employee relations, environmental problems, and issues of multinationals. Uses case studies.

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COURSE: QST FE 449
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323). Required for Finance concentrators.

Covers the financial manager’s role in obtaining and allocating funds. Includes topics such as cash budgeting, working capital analysis, dividend policy, capital investment analysis, and debt policy as well as their associated risks. Valuation of companies, mergers and acquisitions, and bankruptcy are covered. The course requires using financial models and spreadsheets. Applications are made to current events and everyday business finance problems.

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COURSE: MET CJ 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Criminal Justice. Contemporary law enforcement agencies regularly employ crime and intelligence analysis to develop and inform effective responses to crime. This course provides an in-depth examination of crime and intelligence analysis techniques. Also explores the role of the crime and intelligence analyst within law enforcement organizations and processes, the historical evolution of this approach, key legal and policy issues, and challenges to implementation. Students have the opportunity to apply these skills to case study simulations involving an array of common crime problems and cases using real-world examples and sources of information.

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COURSE: CAS ES 105
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

After covering the origin of the universe, earth, and life, the course examines two topics: natural hazards, including earthquakes and volcanoes; and human impacts on Earth, including climate change, ozone depletion, pollution, and increasing demands on mineral and energy resources.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Research and Information Literacy.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: MET CS 555
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (MET CS 544), equivalent knowledge, or instructor’s consent.

Provides an overview of the statistical tools most commonly used to process, analyze, and visualize data. Topics include simple linear regression, multiple regression, logistic regression, analysis of variance, and survival analysis. These topics are explored using the statistical package R, with a focus on understanding how to use and interpret output from this software as well as how to visualize results. In each topic area, the methodology, including underlying assumptions and the mechanics of how it all works along with appropriate interpretation of the results, are discussed. Concepts are presented in context of real world examples.

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COURSE: MET CS 342
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (MET CS 232) or instructor’s consent.

Covers data structures using the Java programming language. Topics include data abstraction, encapsulation, information hiding, and the use of recursion, creation, and manipulation of various data structures: lists, queues, tables, trees, heaps, and graphs, and searching and sorting algorithms.

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COURSE: SED DE 551
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Representative fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama depicted in readings and videotapes related to everyday lives of Deaf people. Develops insight and appreciation of Deaf literature and ASL folklore and their implications for education.

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COURSE: SED SP 685
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Provides a social, historical, legal and political context for understanding education practice and policies. Addresses issues of equity, access, civil rights, moral and ethical considerations, rights of students, parents and teachers, and the larger purpose of public education in our democracy.

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COURSE: COM CM 323
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Provides knowledge and practice for effective graphic design for all media. Develops a foundation in design principles and creative software skills including Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Students create projects demonstrating how design strategies are used to engage audiences, and enhance comprehension of all forms of mass communication from traditional print to digital media.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Digital/Multimedia Expression, Creativity/Innovation.

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COURSE: CAS EN 373
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A survey of crime and detective fiction from the late 18th to the late 20th centuries, in the British and American traditions. Reading, discussion, exams, and written work focus on masters of the genre, including Poe, Doyle, Christie, Sayers, Hammett, Chandler, and Cain.

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COURSE: CAS BI 410
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 203) or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Contemporary aspects of embryonic development, drawing from current literature. Emphasis on the use of experimental approaches to address topics such as polarity in the egg, body axis specification, embryonic patterning, and organogenesis. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS PS 241
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Critical review of research and theories pertaining to intellectual and social development of infants and children. Role of early experiences and biological factors in later formation of personality, and intellectual and motivational behaviors; includes theories of Erikson, Piaget, and Freud.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS MA 226
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230).

First-order linear and separable equations. Second-order equations and first- order systems. Linear equations and linearization. Numerical and qualitative analysis. Laplace transforms. Applications and modeling of real phenomena throughout.

Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 231.

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COURSE: COM CM 443
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM CM 215 or COM CM 301).

Explores the effects of new media on the fundamental theories, models, and practices of public relations. Studies how websites, blogs, citizen journalism, social media, direct-to-consumer communication, podcasting, viral marketing, and other technology-enabled changes are affecting interpersonal, small group, and mass media relationships. Also covers and uses the interactive tools that are re- defining the practice of public relations. Combines lecture, discussion, guest speakers, case study, and research to help students uncover and appreciate the power and potential of interactive media.

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COURSE: CFA AR 515
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CFA AR 415) or equivalent.

Acquaints students with the basics of RAW image capture using a digital camera, non-destructive image file management, input and output resolution management, establishment of a digital workflow, adjustment and editing in Adobe Photoshop, fundamentals of color correcting management, digital retouching, and high-end archival inkjet printing. Access to a digital SLR camera is necessary. Material costs are extra.

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COURSE: CAS IR 330
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This course is designed to familiarize students with the “art of the possible,” emphasizing the evolution of diplomatic practice. Students will be able to understand how foreign policy is formulated and promulgated and how diplomacy works on a daily basis. The course explores the role and importance of multilateral diplomacy/international organizations (liberalism) in today’s world and examines how multilateral diplomacy functions. Students will grasp the core principles of diplomatic negotiations and demonstrate them in simulations.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy, Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: MET CS 248
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Fundamentals of logic (the laws of logic, rules of inferences, quantifiers, proofs of theorems). Fundamental principles of counting (permutations, combinations), set theory, relations and functions, graphs, trees and sorting.

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COURSE: CAS MA 293
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 123).

Propositional logic, set theory. Elementary probability theory. Number theory. Combinatorics with applications.

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COURSE: CAS PO 390
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Political Theory. In this political theory course, we examine dilemmas surrounding domination and liberation in political theory and practice. We ask what liberation is, how diverse forms of domination obstruct it; and whether freedom can be sustained in a lasting way.

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COURSE: CFA AR 235
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CFA AR 133) or equivalent.

Drawing from portrait head and figure; emphasis on structure of the human form and the space in which it exists. Experimentation in various media. (Accommodations will be made for students with varying degrees of experience.)

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COURSE: CFA AR 136
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to the practice of representational drawing with the human figure. Focuses on establishing basic skills concerning the translation of three dimensional form onto the two dimensional page. Students investigate methods of identification, definition, and location of form in a comprehensive space utilizing a variety of materials and approaches. Students work from still life, the figure, interior and exterior spaces, and themselves.

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COURSE: CAS PS 333
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS PS 101) and (CAS PS 231 or CAS NE 101) and PS junior or senior standing; or consent of instructor.

Comprehensive survey of drug influences on behavior; introduces a neuroscience approach to behavior. Several classes of drugs are discussed, including abused and addictive substances and psychoactive and therapeutic agents.

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COURSE: CAS EC 337
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

Economic analysis of current important legal issues. Contributions of economics to analysis of contracts, torts property, and crime. Effects of property rights on allocation of resources and distribution of income. Market and nonmarket schemes of regulating the environment.

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COURSE: CAS EC 404
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

(CAS EC 201 and one of CAS MA 121, 122, 123, 124, 127 or 129), or consent of instructor. Recommended: CAS EC 403.

Introduction to the field of information economics and its applications. Covers a wide range of situations in which players have access to different private information and this private information differently affects their incentives and strategic behavior.

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COURSE: CAS EC 320
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 101 & CAS EC 102).

Theoretical and empirical examination of the structural changes associated with the process of economic development; special reference to poor regions and countries; rigorous analysis of criteria for policy judgments in development planning and programming.

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COURSE: CAS EC 385
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 201) and (CAS EC 203 or CAS EC 305); or the equivalent.

Applies the tools of microeconomic theory and empirical methods to study questions such as the optimal design of sports leagues, the impact of new stadiums on a local economy, fan (customer) discrimination, and salary differentials between players.

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COURSE: CAS EC 356
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

Application of current theories of labor supply and demand, wages, education and experience, immigration, labor efficiency, discrimination, and unemployment. Appraisal of the effects of government policies on labor markets.

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COURSE: SED EN 630
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Examines the teaching and learning of humanities in urban schooling and considers how issues of race, gender, class, language, and culture affect the nature of literacy in schools. By linking students’ academic coursework to a field experience with urban adolescents and their teachers, students have the opportunity to co-plan with teachers and work individually, in small groups, and with classes of diverse student populations, including English learners. Students then reflect on how their experiences link to theories and practices being explored in the course.

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COURSE: ENG EK 307
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Coreq: (CAS PY 212).

Introduction to electric circuit analysis and design; voltage, current, and power, circuit laws and theorems; element I-V curves, linear and nonlinear circuit concepts; operational amplifier circuits; transient response of capacitor and inductor circuits, sinusoidal steady-state response, frequency response, transfer functions. Includes design-oriented laboratory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: ENG EC 455
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PY 212 & CAS MA 226).

Time varying electric and magnetic fields. Maxwell equations. Electromagnetic waves. Propagation, reflection, and transmission. Remote sensing applications. Radio frequency coaxial cables, microwave waveguides, and optical fibers. Microwave sources and resonators. Antennas and radiation. Radio links, radar, and wireless communication systems. Electromagnetic effects in high-speed digital systems.

ENG EC 455 and ENG EC 456 may be taken at the same time. Includes discussion.

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COURSE: ENG EC 456
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PY 212 & CAS MA 226).

Electric field, energy, and force. Lorenz force. Dielectric materials. Steady electric currents. Magnetic field, energy, and force. Magnetic materials. Applications of electrostatics, magnetostatics, and electrodynamics. Electromagnetic waves in dielectric and conducting materials. Solution techniques for electromagnetic fields and waves.

ENG EC 455 and ENG EC 456 may be taken at the same time. Includes discussion.

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COURSE: MET MG 448
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

First course in a two course sequence. Combines (1) the practical aspect of web design through the use of application software such as Dreamweaver to construct a commercial website with (2) a general overview of the marketing, supporting services, systems, security, and business strategy issues facing commercial enterprises.

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COURSE: CAS LY 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS LY 111).

Advances proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic to the Beginner High level. Expands vocabulary repertoire. Students practice speaking, listening, reading, and writing using engaging materials and real-life communicative activities.

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COURSE: CAS PY 105
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The CAS PY 105/106 sequence satisfies premedical requirements. PY105 covers some of the basic principles underlying the physics of everyday life, including forces and motion, momentum and energy, harmonic motion, rotation, and heat and thermodynamics. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS PY 106
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS PY 105) or equivalent.

The CAS PY 105/106 sequence satisfies premedical requirements. PY106 covers some of the basic principles underlying the physics of everyday life, including electricity and magnetism, direct-current circuits, waves, optics, and modern physics. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS MA 113
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Basic concepts of estimation and tests of hypotheses, ideas from probability; one-, two-, and multiple-sample problems. Applications are in the social sciences and students will be able to understand the basics of using a sample to predict uncertainty.

Primarily for students in the social sciences who require a one-semester introduction to statistics; others should consider CAS MA 115 or MA 213. MA 113 may not be taken for credit by any student who has completed any MA course numbered 300 or higher. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CFA MT 105
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A creative introduction to the foundational principles of musical structure. Using a multi-modal approach, combining in-class performance exercises, listening, composition, keyboard, aural (and oral) learning, students acquire an analytical vocabulary and the basic knowledge to support the exploration of musical repertoires, to enhance their own performances, and to develop their own musical compositions. Analytical and music-composition projects engage concepts of musical space, time, pitch, rhythm, and harmony as employed in tonal music.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Creativity/Innovation.

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COURSE: CAS EC 203
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 101 & CAS EC 102).

First semester of a two-semester sequence of empirical techniques used in economic analysis. Statistical concepts are presented and applied to a variety of economics problems. Extensive use of the statistical software package STATA will be made.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning I.

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COURSE: CAS EC 204
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq:(CAS EC 101 & CAS EC 102) and (CAS EC 203 or equivalent).

Builds on the material in EC203, developing more complex statistical techniques and applications. This course covers similar material to that in CAS EC 304 but in a more applied fashion (students who desire a more mathematically intense introduction to econometrics should consider taking EC 304 rather than EC 204).

Note that students may not receive credit for both EC 204 and EC 304. Either EC 204 or EC 304 may be counted as one of the three required electives in the economics minor.

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COURSE: CFA ME 550
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

This course, which includes an online component, focuses on progressive and imaginative modes of music education. It draws on the best practices of music and other artistic disciplines to inspire singers, teachers, and arts practitioners of all ages and abilities to discover the power of their own voices and the importance of including others in collaborative music-making.

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COURSE: CAS EN 552
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

The heritage of Marlowe and Shakespeare: the collapse of a historic world; Jacobean pessimism and decadence in the plays of Webster, Middleton, Ford, and others.

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COURSE: MET MG 410
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Covers the four key elements of successful entrepreneurial management: choosing a business, organizing, financing, and marketing. Includes preparing a business plan, becoming an entrepreneur, raising venture capital, selling, negotiating, and building an effective organization. Topics given special consideration are the practice of innovation, the art of leadership, and how to relate talents to succeeding in innovative venture and technology management.

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COURSE: CAS GE 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduces natural and social science concepts that underlie global environmental change and sustainability. Topics include climate change, biodiversity, energy, water, pollution, deforestation, agriculture, population growth. Sustainable development illustrated with ecological footprint based on student’s lifestyle.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning.

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COURSE: SAR HS 300
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines the distribution of health and diseases across the population, and the factors that impact health. Which group of people is more likely to experience a heart attack or develop diabetes? Do our level of education and our income impact our health and our life expectancy? This course studies how we approach understanding disease distribution within the population. It covers the principles and methods used in epidemiology, particularly as it relates to public health, including the types of study designs used in health research, disease screening, and infectious disease outbreak investigation.

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COURSE: SED ME 530
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Focuses on the examination of the teaching and learning of mathematics and science in schools with diverse populations. This course considers how race, gender, class, language and culture affect students’ opportunities to learn mathematics and science. Challenges common to urban and rural districts are studied. Instructional activities for teaching mathematics and science to diverse populations are analyzed.

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COURSE: CAS BI 309
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 107 & CAS BI 108) or equivalent.

Introduction to modern concepts, controversies, and analytical approaches in evolutionary biology. Topics include adaptation, natural and sexual selection, species and speciation, phylogenetics, comparative analysis, basic population and quantitative genetics, origin of novelty, adaptive radiation, development and evolution. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: SAR AT 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SAR HS 369 or SAR HS 581). MSAT students only. Coreq: (SAR AT 520).

This three-semester course sequence provides the student a process for prevention, examination, diagnosis, and treatment of patients. The course begins with the study of the basic principles and underlying theories relating to examination and treatment techniques and applies them to examination, diagnosis, and management of patients in acute distress. Includes certification in emergency cardiac care. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

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COURSE: SAR HS 342 / SAR HS 542
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 211 or CAS BI 315) or consent of instructor.

Application of physiological principles under different exercise conditions. Integration of the body systems in performance of exercise, work, and sports; immediate and long range effects of these activities on the body. Laboratory includes the measurement of physiological parameters under exercise conditions. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

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COURSE: CAS PH 248
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines how existentialist thinkers grappled with some of the most problematic aspects of the human condition.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS PS 325
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: ((CAS PS 211 or (CAS MA 115 & CAS MA 116)) and (CAS PS 251 or CAS PS 252)).

Systematic approaches to the study of personality. Experimental and observational investigations of selected aspects of personality. Demonstration of experimental procedures and student participation in laboratory and field studies.

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COURSE: QST ES 215
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: sophomore standing. For Questrom students only, and CGS students intending to continue to Questrom. Combines the content of ES 110 and ES 210.

The course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, tools, and skills needed to explore career opportunities and build their career management capabilities. This course focuses on career exploration within the broader context and scope of business careers. Students explore personal values, interests, and skills as the foundation for career management. They learn skills for exploring traditional and emerging industries, organizations, and occupations that align with their business and career aspirations. Students learn and apply basic career search tools and techniques, craft a strong resume and cover letter, develop a search strategy, practice interviewing and informational conversations, and begin to network with Questrom students and alumni.

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COURSE: SED CT 526
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Explores the ways that schools can work closely with families, communities, and community agencies to increase connections and mutual assistance. Consistent with DESE regulations, this course emphasizes collaborative relationships with families and with community partners such as youth-serving organizations, health and safety agencies, and other groups and businesses.

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COURSE: MET UA 527
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines historical and contemporary issues involved in providing food to cities and metropolitan areas. Tracing the routes that food takes into the city and the major sources of food, the course looks closely at the accessibility of food, especially in poorer urban neighborhoods. Among topics covered are obesigenic neighborhoods, food deserts, gentrification and foodie culture, public school food nutrition, attempts to minimize food waste, and immigrants and ethnic foods in the city. The course also considers recent attempts at food production in cities, including urban agriculture, vertical farming, and craft production of food products. After closely looking at the history and current status of food programs, the course concludes with a consideration of urban food policies.

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COURSE: QST SM 104
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Read, understand, and analyze financial statements such as income statements and balance sheets. Covers techniques of internal financial analysis such as breakeven, budgeting, financial forecasting, and tools to aid in decision making. Introduction to the time value of money and capital budgeting using discounted cash flow analysis. Intended for non-business majors.

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COURSE: SHA HF 410
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SHA HF 210) and (SHA HF 310) and (CAS MA 113 or CAS MA 115).

Studies the techniques financial managers and external analysts employ to value the firm and its assets. Topics include financial statement analysis, taxation, discounted cash flow, stock and bond valuation, cost of capital, and capital budgeting. The techniques of discounted cash flow and the command of taxation principles developed in the course are applied to commercial real estate analysis, including hospitality properties.

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COURSE: QST AC 221
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (QST SM 131) and (CAS MA 120 or CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123, previous or concurrent).

Basic concepts underlying financial statements and accounting procedures used in preparing statements of financial position, income statements, and statements of cash flow. Stresses the interpretation, analysis, and evaluation of published financial statements.

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COURSE: MET MG 472
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Emphasizes issues of accounting, finance, and economics that are important in most management contexts. Introduction to tools of financial analysis and the problems of financial management including cash, profitability, and capital budgeting. Various sources of corporate funds are considered, including short-, intermediate-, and long-term arrangements. Stresses understanding financial statements, planning and control, cost and benefit evaluation, cash flow analysis, and capital budgeting.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

This course examines jazz music, with a focus on Boston as a leading center for jazz in the US. Topics include the evolution and history of jazz; its spread to different regions of the country; its major genres or movements; great jazz musicians, bandleaders, and critics; connections between jazz and other musical genres; and the development of jazz in Boston, with special attention to Boston’s musicians, musical styles, schools, and clubs, both past and present. Course materials are drawn from a variety of genres and modes, including concerts, concert reviews, video and audio recordings, historical accounts, and scholarly articles.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This course examines and reflects on the contemporary relevance of ethical questions that have arisen in the public health arena over the last hundred years. Topics include race medicine; the eugenics movement in the United States and the related 1927 Supreme Court case, Buck v. Bell; and the evolution of restrictions on interracial marriage, eventually overturned by the 1967 case Loving v. Virginia. These issues are discussed with an eye toward their relevance to contemporary debates about public health.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

“Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind.” So wrote Ralph Waldo Emerson, expressing a sentiment that seems native to the American character. From mountain men to entrepreneurs, from pioneers to beatniks, from suffragettes to senators, Americans have identified with roles that are individualistic, independent, and self-reliant. This seminar investigates the degree to which this attitude is rooted and reflected in our literary tradition. Readings will include Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” Ginsburg’s “Howl,” and Twain’s Huckleberry Finn.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This course looks at how our use of language and the form of our language has changed because of technology. From the pen to the phone to the Internet, our use of language is influenced by the changes in technology around us. Through the production of verbal and non-verbal artifacts, students learn how to master a variety of discourse and research methods, how to read various cultural texts, and how to produce their own texts in response. Readings will include Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer and Alone Together – Why we expect more from Technology and Less from Each Other by Sherry Turkle.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Muriel Ruykeyser once said, “The world is made of stories, not of atoms.” This seminar takes Rukeyser’s quote as a guide and examines the world through the lens of short fiction. Does literature reflect or direct society? What insights can we glean about a culture or period from reading? What choices do writers make and what is the effect of different styles or techniques of writing? We look to the answer these questions through several great American short stories including Ernest Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants,” Flannery O’Conner’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” and Truman Capote’s “Miriam.”

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

This seminar examines the construction of the self in graphic memoirs. It explores this visual-textual form of autobiographical writing and engages in important conversations about the blurry boundary between truth and fiction, past and present, public and private. The course also analyzes how graphic choices contribute to the evolving construction of the author’s identity. Exposure to graphic self-writing in print and online allows students to consider how form and style impact both the author’s voice and the reader’s experience. Students also have the opportunity to develop their own “graphic self” through regular drawing and reading response exercises, which culminate in the creation of short graphic memoirs. Readings may include Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, David Small’s Stitches, and Allie Brosh’s Hyperbole and a Half, along with supplementary scholarly articles and theoretical texts.

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COURSE: CAS WR 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

The twentieth century witnessed drastic changes in politics, culture, science, and technology, as well as global-scale wars. This course examines how poets represent and react to such tumultuous times. It looks at some of the major events that shape the century and considers how poets of the period represent gender, ethnicity, culture, politics, and art. The course explores questions that seem particularly relevant to our own time: How do we define and represent gender? How do ethnic minorities live in hostile communities? What is the relationship between art and politics? Includes poems by Stein, Loy, Millay, Pound, Stevens, Auden, Owen, Yeats, Hughes, McKay, Cullen, and Dunbar, as well as selected poems in translation.

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COURSE: CFA AR 141
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

A studio course that emphasizes two-dimensional composition and direct painting in oil. Exercises in representing still life, interior, and portrait introduce basic principles of drawing, composition, and color interaction. Exercises in color mixing, preparing supports, and caring for tools and equipment introduce technical and craft considerations. Individual and group critiques, presentations, and occasional assigned readings complement regular studio class meetings.

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COURSE: MET CS 544
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (MET CS546 and (MET CS520 or MET CS521)) or equivalent knowledge, or instructor’s consent.

Provides students with the mathematical and practical background required in the field of data analytics. Starting with an introduction to probability and statistics, the R tool is introduced for statistical computing and graphics. Different types of data are investigated along with data summarization techniques and plotting. Data populations using discrete, continuous, and multivariate distributions are explored. Errors during measurements and computations are analyzed in the course. Confidence intervals and hypothesis testing topics are also examined. The concepts covered in the course are demonstrated using R. Laboratory Course.

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COURSE: CAS LF 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

A multimedia approach for students who have never studied French. A variety of communicative tasks develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.

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COURSE: CAS LF 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS LF 111) or placement test results. Continues CAS LF 111.

A multimedia approach which develops speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills, together with the grammar and vocabulary needed for more complex communicative tasks.

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COURSE: CAS LF 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS LF 112) or placement test results.

Advances proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening in a communicative classroom setting. Grammar is studied in context, through thematic discussions on topics such as daily life and Francophone culture, through short readings, and through diverse written tasks.

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COURSE: CAS LF 212
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS LF 211) or placement test results.

Advances four skills proficiency in a communicative classroom setting. Grammar is used in context through thematic discussions, the reading of a short novel, and in diverse written tasks.

Fulfills CAS language requirement, prepares for Level 1 Advanced Courses (CAS LF 307 — LF 311). This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy

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COURSE: CAS PO 330
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in Comparative Politics. Introduces students to key theories explaining the rise of extremism in democracies, including economic marginalization, the democratic deficit, and ethnic competition and gives students the tools to evaluate contemporary political events through the lens of these (and other) theories.

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COURSE: SAR AT 520 / SAR PT 520
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SAR HS 369 or SAR HS 581). Coreq: (SAR AT 510 / SAR PT 515).

Builds on previous knowledge of human musculoskeletal anatomy to examine human movement. Principles of biomechanics, connective tissue behavior, and muscle physiology are integrated with joint structure and function to form the basis of understanding normal and pathological movement. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 383
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 281 & CAS BI 282) and enrollment in Seven-Year Liberal Arts/Medical Education Program.

An introduction to physiological principles applied across the levels of organization (cell, tissue, organ systems). Intended to prepare the student for more advanced courses in physiology. Topics include homeostasis and neural, muscle, cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine, metabolic, and reproductive physiology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: COM CM 417
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (COM CM 217 or COM CM 317) and (COM CM 331).

Focus is on the strategic creative process in advertising including concept development, copywriting, visualization, and design. Assignments require conceiving solutions to client marketing challenges across a range of media. Teaches foundations for development of effective advertising: problem definition, strategic development, and conceptual idea generation through tangible executions.

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COURSE: CAS IR 230
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Introduction to basic concepts of international politics: the state system and types of states, modern ideologies, legal frameworks of international transactions, and political regions. Also raises key issues such as population, the environment, war, and international law.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

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COURSE: CAS EC 403
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123 or CAS MA 127).

Models of decision-making in which the choices of different individuals interact: basic equilibrium notions in normal form games, including signaling games and repeated games. Applications include auctions, foreign policy, takeover bids, entry deterrence, cooperation and conflict, financial markets, and public goods.

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COURSE: CAS WS 302 / CAS SO 390
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Topics in Sociology. Examines social forces shaping gender discrepancies in crime. Using a feminist lens, students explore how cultural ideologies about masculinity and femininity shape criminalization, victimization, and offending. Topics include the gendered contexts of crime and punishment, gender-based violence, and intimate labor.

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COURSE: SAR HS 400 / CAS WS 400
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS WR 120) or equivalent.

This course focuses on strengthening students’ knowledge, skills, and ability to construct a critical appraisal of all the determinants, distribution, causes, mechanisms, systems, and consequences of health inequities related to gender. Emphasis is placed on the historical perspective of women as both recipients and providers of health care, including an exploration of psychological, physiological, social, and political barriers to women’s health and professional life as healthcare providers. The course provides both theoretical and topical coverage of gender and its influence on healthcare, both at the system and individual level. It explores how gender influences and is influenced by healthcare systems through an exploration of some of the major historical, social, and scientific developments that have determined contemporary issues.

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COURSE: CAS CH 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: two years of high school algebra.

For science majors and minors who require a two-semester general chemistry course. Topics include atoms and molecules; molecular connectivity, infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry; stoichiometry and introduction to reactions in aqueous solutions; thermochemistry and the first law of thermodynamics; quantum aspects of light and matter; and bonding in diatomic and polyatomic molecules. Laboratory exercises include the size of an atom, qualitative analysis, thermochemistry, and quantum aspects of light and matter. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS CH 101).

For science majors and minors who require a two-semester general chemistry course. Topics include properties of gases; solutions and solubility; equilibrium; acids, bases, and buffers; electrochemistry; spontaneity, free energy and the second law of thermodynamics; and chemical kinetics.

Students must have completed CAS CH 101 prior to enrolling in CAS CH 102. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 131
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Coreq: (CAS MA 123).

A one-semester, terminal general chemistry course for students who do not require a two-semester sequence. Lecture topics include stoichiometry; atomic and molecular structure; theories of bonding; chemistry of the solid, liquid, and gaseous states; properties of solutions; chemical thermodynamics; equilibrium; acids and bases; electrochemistry. Laboratory includes training in basic laboratory techniques such as data collection and recording, statistical interpretation of data, solution preparation, titrations, conducting chemical reactions, use of spectrophotometers, pH and voltmeters.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 311
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 203 & CAS BI 206) or consent of instructor.

Biology of bacteria and related microorganisms; morphology, physiology, genetics, ecology, and control. Brief introduction to pathogenicity and host reactions. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS PY 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 123) or consent of instructor for students concurrently taking CAS MA 123. Coreq: (CAS MA 124 or CAS MA 127).

Calculus-based introduction to basic principles of physics, emphasizing Newtonian mechanics, conservation laws, and thermodynamics. For science majors and engineers, and for premedical students who seek a more analytical course than CAS PY 105/106. Interactive, student-centered lectures and laboratory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking, Teamwork/Collaboration.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS PY 212
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS PY 211 & CAS MA 124) or consent of instructor for students concurrently taking CAS MA 123 or CAS MA 225.

Calculus-based introduction to basic principles of physics, emphasizing electromagnetism, circuits, and optics. For science majors and engineers, and for premedical students who seek a more analytical course than CAS PY 105/106. Interactive, student- centered lectures and laboratory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking, Teamwork/Collaboration.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS PS 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Basic introduction to the field of psychology. Topics include theories and findings governing learning, memory, perception, development, personality, and social and abnormal psychology.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS BI 206
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 108 & CAS CH 203) or equivalent.

Principles of classical, molecular, and evolutionary genetics derived from analytical, molecular, and whole genome cytological evidence in animals, plants, and microorganisms.

Students must attend both lecture and discussion. Students may receive credit for CAS BI 206 or 216, but not both.

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COURSE: CAS CS 132
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 111; CAS MA 123 recommended).

Basic concepts, data structures, and algorithms for geometric objects. Examples of topics: Cartesian geometry, transformations and their representation, queries and sampling, triangulations. Emphasis on rigorous reasoning and analysis, advancing algorithmic maturity and expertise in its application.

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COURSE: CAS MA 549
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: consent of instructor.

Problem-oriented seminar in modern geometry focusing on invariants of transformation groups. Specific topics may include Euclidean and plane geometry, Hilbert’s Axioms, conics, tilings, finite, projective, spherical and/or hyperbolic geometry, tessellations, applications to number theory, Platonic Solids.

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COURSE: MET UA 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Urban Affairs. Provides a framework for understanding the global network of cities and how particular cities occupy niches within that network. The course uses Boston and Massachusetts “Gateway Cities” to explore the long-term forces shaping global economic activity and urban development, including transportation, telecommunications, international trade, immigration, innovation, higher education, and cultural exchange. The United Nations Habitat III Conference and other international urban organizations are used to examine strategies for sustainable urban development in cities around the world.

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COURSE: SED AP 625
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Explores the dynamic global landscape of higher education, compares and contrasts differing national models, and delves into how U.S. institutions internationalize their efforts and create professional roles on campuses, both here and abroad, that support global programs and students from other countries.

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COURSE: SED AP 612
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Focuses on decision-making in higher education and identifies, from a historical perspective, the changing roles of trustees, faculty, administrators, and students in the governance process. Includes an examination of how external forces influence decisions at a campus level. Accountability of the governing bodies and decision-makers is addressed.

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COURSE: CAS CS 591
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS CS 112) or consent of instructor.

Topics in Computer Science. This course investigates new tools and mathematics that aid in understanding real-world graphs. The course begins with a quick review of basic graph theory (various definitions, some key concepts, theorems, and algorithms). It then introduces some more advanced concepts such as random graph theory and spectral graph theory. Using such tools, students investigate various models and concepts that attempt to describe real-world networks – scale-free networks, preferential attachment, sparse and inhomogenous models, etc. We also discuss some key recent results such as Szeremedi’s regularity lemma. The course also studies some past and future applications of these concepts that are relevant to students’ current interests. At least the half of the grade will be based on term projects to be done in small groups.

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COURSE: CFA AR 389
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Covers the basic principles of design, composition, and form making. These topics are investigated holistically, beginning with their historical origination, contemporary application, and finally in the context of individual practice. Projects and class meetings are structured to help develop a design process and critique skills. The goal is to provide a rigorous understanding of the foundational principles and skills that serve as a strong base for all future design course work and practice. Working knowledge of the Adobe Creative Suite is helpful; software will not be taught. Laptop required. Materials and printing costs are extra.

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COURSE: CAS AR 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 3

Illustrated lectures focus on the important discoveries of the discipline of archaeology. Course covers the whole of human prehistory around the world. Archaeological methods are described, along with the great ancient sites: Olduvai, Lascaux, Stonehenge, Egyptian pyramids, Machu Picchu.

This course carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Course fulfills Archaeology Undergraduate area requirement. This course fulfills one unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I.

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COURSE: SAR HS 581
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: ((CAS BI 105 & CAS BI 106) or (CAS BI 107 & CAS BI 108)) and (CAS BI 211 or CAS BI 315).

Regional approach to the musculoskeletal, peripheral nervous, and circulatory systems of the human body. Laboratories reinforce the lectures by a study of osteology, prosected cadavers, and live anatomy palpations. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CFA MU 184
CREDITS: 1 US credit
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to the fundamentals of guitar playing. Intended for all students, no previous experience is necessary. By learning music from the Beatles to Bach to the Blues, we cover basic chords, scales, music notation, and both pick- and finger-style playing. Web- and text-based resources are recommended so that students can continue to teach themselves to play after the course ends. Students should bring their own guitars. Several are available for rent from the Music office.

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COURSE: CAS HI 287
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Analysis of the history of American foreign policy from the perspective of the changing world and regional international systems; emphasis on the effect of these systems and the impact of America on the creation and operation of international systems.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry II.

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COURSE: CAS PH 300
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

The history of ancient Greek philosophy from its beginnings through Aristotle: the cosmos, human nature, Socrates and Plato, metaphysics, music, atomic theories, immortality, friendship, love, being and nonbeing, civil disobedience, form and formlessness, definitions, and the hierarchy of reality.

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COURSE: CFA AR 580
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A chronological survey of theory and practice of graphic design from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Through slide lecture, reading assignments, discussion and a studio project, we actively investigate how graphic design responded to and influenced the social, political, and technological world around it. Emphasis is on European and American design histories, in addition to major movements in Russia and the East. Comparative and symbiotic relationships between graphic design and other visual arts and design disciplines such as architecture and industrial design are analyzed. Questions and comments during the discussion are both welcome and expected.

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COURSE: CAS IR 350
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

What are the causes and consequences of the global Cold War? How was the twentieth-century international system transformed by East-West conflict, North-South disparity and South-South cooperation and competition? What lessons can be drawn from this recent past? These are some of the questions examined by this course. The course contextualizes present-day international and regional conflicts and cooperation in the recent past, collectively analyzes primary source documents, and discusses policy implications.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS IR 349
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

What were the causes and the consequences of the two World Wars? What was the nature of political, economic, and military relations among the major powers of the world from the beginning of the twentieth century to the end of the Second World War? What was the effect of domestic factors (political, economic, religious, and ideological) on the foreign policies of individual states? Seeking to provide a genuinely multinational perspective on world affairs, this course assesses the ways in which powerful nation-states in this period competed and cooperated in the international system.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CFA MH 432
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A chronological study of the history of — and topics in — jazz, from its beginnings to the present, focusing on styles, major performers and recordings, individuality and sound, instruments, voices, and forms, as well as social and cultural issues, such as race, popularity and commercialism, the individual versus and within the group, American identity and global rejection/admiration.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS HI 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Traces the evolution of medieval civilization from the fourth to the fourteenth centuries. Emphasizes three main themes: the political and social development of western Europe, the evolution of Latin Christianity, and the role of popular culture.

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COURSE: CAS HI 280
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in American History. Examines the role of popular music in American culture. Studies the origin and growth of the music industry, and attempts to integrate it into the general social and intellectual history of the country. The emphasis is on rock ‘n’ roll and its impact on America from 1954-1970.

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COURSE: SHA HF 432
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: SHA HF 231, Seniors only.

Focus on leadership and management for the hospitality industry. Using a leadership continuum as a framework, the course explores several different levels of leadership, from a “traditional” leadership role as the head of a major corporation, to the more personal aspect of self-leadership. Several different leadership models are analyzed and applied to the hospitality industry. Leadership tools are explored: hands-on, realistic tools that students can use in personal life, while in school, and in the business world.

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COURSE: CAS BI 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 105) or equivalent.

Intensive preprofessional course for students whose programs require anatomy. Not for biology major or minor credit. Gross structure of the human body; skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title formerly numbered CAS BI 106.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS AN 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduces basic principles of evolutionary biology, human origins, genetics, reproduction, socio-ecology, and the evolution of primate and human behavior and adaptions. Laboratory sections include examination of fossil and skeletal material, and hands-on projects involving human and primate behavior and biology.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS BI 114
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

A study of the world’s major human diseases, their causes, effects on history, pathology, and cures. Principles of immunology. Emphasis on present maladies such as AIDS, herpes, cancer, mononucleosis, tuberculosis, influenza, and hepatitis. This course is appropriate for non-majors and students in the health and paramedical sciences. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. Not for Biology major or minor credit. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: SAR HS 251 / SAR HS 551
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108).

An introduction to nutrition with a focus on the relationship between diet and health. Basic scientific information is presented in preparation for a discussion of applied issues such as weight management and prevention of chronic disease. Emphasis is placed on translation of current dietary recommendations to actual food choices.

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COURSE: CAS BI 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: ((CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108) and (CAS BI 106 or CAS BI 210)) or equivalent. Some knowledge of chemistry and anatomy is assumed. Intended mainly for students in health sciences. Not for biology major or minor credit; Biology majors/minors should take CAS BI 315.

Introduction to principles of systemic mammalian physiology with special reference to humans. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: SHA HF 231
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SHA HF 100).

Explores contemporary human resources management relative to the hospitality industry, with emphasis on planning, job analysis, recruitment, selection, hiring, placement, and ethnic diversity in the workplace. Specifically, the course concentrates on employee motivation, leadership, training, team building, employee performance, and retention. Management philosophies of work compensation, discipline, and labor relations are discussed as they affect current hospitality industry strategies to attract and retain a quality workforce.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS AH 389
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Impressionism, its sources, and its aftermath, from the painting of modern life and leisure by Manet, Monet, Morisot, Renoir, and Degas, to the evocation of spirituality, pain, and desire in the work of Van Gogh, Gauguin, Rodin, and Munch.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

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COURSE: MET CS 632
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A comprehensive overview of the principles, processes, and practices of software project management. Students learn techniques for planning, organizing, scheduling, and controlling software projects. There is substantial focus on software cost estimation and software risk management. Students obtain practical project management skills and competencies related to the definition of a software project, establishment of project communications, managing project changes, and managing distributed software teams and projects.

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COURSE: QST IS 479
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST IS 223).

Surveys the organizational implementation, uses, and impacts of advanced information technology including decision support systems, management support systems, and expert systems. Includes a group project to design and develop a decision support system.

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COURSE: QST AC 347
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST AC 221) and (QST AC 222, previous or concurrent).

Provides foundation for solving financial reporting issues through the study of the conceptual framework of accounting, recognition and measurement of current and non-current assets, revenue recognition, and the development of the income statement and balance sheet.

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COURSE: CAS EC 202
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 102).

Determination of aggregate income and employment. Analysis of fiscal and monetary policy. Inflation and incomes policy. Problems of the open economy.

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COURSE: CAS EC 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 101). Determination of commodity prices and factor prices under differing market conditions of competition and monopoly.

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COURSE: MET MG 520
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Environmental, economic, political, and social constraints on doing business abroad. Examines the effects of overseas business investments on domestic and foreign economics; foreign market analysis and operational strategy of a firm; and development potential of international operations.

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COURSE: CAS EC 391
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

The pure theory of international trade. Topics include comparative advantage and gains from trade, tariff and nontariff barriers to trade, and case studies in international economic policy.

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COURSE: MET MG 431
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Organization of the marketing function in international business. How government policies and practices affect marketing. Comparative marketing strategies for doing business abroad. Examination of case studies.

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COURSE: CAS PO 329 / CAS IR 390
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Emphasizes the dynamic interaction between politics and economics to understand and explain historical and contemporary issues in international political economy, including international monetary, trade, investment, financial, and environmental relations. Considers emerging challenges and structures in the international political economy.

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COURSE: COM CM 217
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Explores the history, nature, function, practice, and social and economic aspects of advertising; ethical responsibilities, psychological appeals, marketing, media, research, product analysis, creative strategies, and agency operation. Students prepare a comprehensive advertising plan including a marketing strategy and speculative advertising campaign.

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COURSE: CAS EN 370
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Topic for July 2019: Toni Morrison’s American Times. Examines four of the Nobel Laureate’s novels, using primary and secondary materials to construct historical contexts and critical perspectives.

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COURSE: CAS MA 511
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230).

Fundamental concepts of mathematical reasoning. Properties of the real- number system, elementary point-set theory, metric spaces. Limits, sequences, series, convergence, uniform convergence, continuity. Differentiability for functions of a single variable, Riemann-Stieltjes integration.

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COURSE: CAS CS 330
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 112, CAS CS 131, and CAS CS 132) or (CAS CS 235) or (CAS CS 237).

Examines the basic principles of algorithm design and analysis; graph algorithms; greedy algorithms; dynamic programming; network flows; polynomial-time reductions; NP-hard and NP-complete problems; approximation algorithms; randomized algorithms.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS AR 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Theory, methods and aims of prehistoric and historical archaeology in the Old and New Worlds. Excavation and recovery of archaeological data; dating techniques; interpretation of finds; relation of archaeology to history and other disciplines. Examination of several Old and New World cultures.

Course provides divisional studies credit in CAS Social Sciences. Course required for major and minor in Archaeology. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I.

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COURSE: CAS AH 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

An introduction to art history and the analysis of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Study of masterpieces from prehistoric to medieval times. Focus on monuments of Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages, with a survey of Egyptian and Near Eastern art.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

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COURSE: CAS AH 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Major monuments and artists. Sequential development, from the Renaissance to the modern period, of major styles in architecture, sculpture, painting, graphic arts, and photography. Relationship of visual art to social and cultural trends.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

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COURSE: CAS ES 107
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to Earth as an integrated system composed of interacting biosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere subsystems. Major themes include earth system stability, instability, and capacity for change on all time scales, including human-induced climate change.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Research and Information Literacy.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS PS 473
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS PS 371) and PS junior or senior standing.

Introduction to current diagnostic and treatment techniques in clinical psychology from empirical, applied, and theoretical perspectives. Topics covered include clinical interviewing, psychological testing, and a comparison of humanistic, analytic, and systems approaches to therapy.

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COURSE: COM CO 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS WR 100 or WR 120) or equivalent.

The College of Communication’s core undergraduate writing course. Students refresh their grammatical and stylistic skills and apply those skills to professional writing assignments. Prepares students to write with clarity, conciseness, precision, and accuracy for the communication fields.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing-Intensive Course, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS CS 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The first course for computer science majors and anyone seeking a rigorous introduction. Develops computational problem-solving skills by programming in the Python language and exposes students to a variety of other topics from computer science and its applications.

Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Creativity/Innovation, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS CS 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS CS 111) or equivalent.

Covers advanced programming techniques and data structures. Topics include recursion, algorithm analysis, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, tables, searching, and sorting.

Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II, Creativity and Innovation, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: SED CE 500
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Emphasizes understanding of the theoretical basis of counseling. Introduces learning skills involved in helping relationships. Selected readings in counseling theory and practice are assigned. As part of the skill-building process, opportunities are provided for in-class practice and demonstrations.

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COURSE: CAS EN 202
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

An exploration of creative writing: fiction, poetry, and possibly creative non-fiction and/or playwriting. Students learn to read like writers (that is, with an eye towards how writers write) and write and revise their own original stories and poems. This class is run as a workshop, so students will share and critique each others’ work. Does not give concentration credit.

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COURSE: SAR HS 210
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This course demonstrates how to access information resources in the biomedical sciences, including hard copy, on-line databases (e.g., LexisNexis, PubMed, OVID), and web searching and how to critically evaluate these information sources. Classes are hands-on learning using laptops.

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COURSE: CAS AN 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

An introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and problems of cultural anthropology, emphasizing the study of both traditional and complex societies. Special attention to the organization and meaning of religion, economic life, kinship and political order; and the problem of cultural variation in the contemporary world.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS EN 143
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Introduction to the understanding, interpretation, and appreciation of a wide range of drama from different eras and diverse places, from the festivals of ancient Greece to the twenty-first century Broadway stage. We consider extraordinary plays from Renaissance England, nineteenth- century Europe, and twentieth-century Africa and the United States. Likely works include Antigone, Macbeth, A Doll’s House, Death and The King’s Horseman, Angels in America, Top Dog / Underdog and Hamilton. Focus on theater as a distinctive, developing artistic form, with explorations of political and aesthetic contexts. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same number that was previously titled “Literary Types: Drama.”

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

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COURSE: CFA AR 133
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

For students with little or no experience in drawing. Introduction to basic problems of expressing volume, space, and light; emphasis on use of line, proportion, and tone. More experienced students may draw from portrait head and figure.

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COURSE: ENG EK 210
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A two-credit introductory course to the principles of engineering design, intended to give second-year undergraduates a basic understanding of the process of converting a product from concept through design and deployment. Students work in multi-disciplinary teams with time and budget constraints on externally-sponsored design projects. Web-based lectures cover topics concurrent with specific phases of the projects. The course culminates in a “Design Competition.” This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: CAS PH 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Many of us want to lead meaningful lives. But what is it for a life to be meaningful? What makes some lives better or more meaningful than others? Can life as a whole have some significance or meaning?

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS PS 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Introduction to the logic and processes involved in descriptive and inferential statistics for psychology. Topics include statistical inference, significance, t-tests, ANOVAs, correlation, and statistical software analysis. This is a hybrid class: class time is reserved for hands on activities.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning I.

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COURSE: QST FE 101
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq for Questrom students: (QST SM 131). Coreq for non-Questrom students: (QST SM 131, strongly recommended). Required of all Questrom first-year students.

Offers a rigorous overview of principles of finance, such as time value of money, interest rates, basic valuation of cash flow streams, and basic stock and bond valuation. Uses a combination of teaching materials including online problem solving and case writing that help the student through the intensive syllabus.

FE 101 and FE 323 offer a comprehensive overview of finance to Questrom School of Business students.

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COURSE: SAR HS 325
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Provides students with an overview of the complex social, economic, political, environmental, and biological factors that structure the origins, consequences, and possible treatments of illness worldwide, as well as the promotion of health. Students learn about the major themes and concepts shaping the interdisciplinary field of global health, and gain an understanding of solutions to health challenges that have been successfully implemented in different parts of the world. Major topics include the linkages between global health and economic development, the global burden of disease, key actors in global health, and lessons learned from the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

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COURSE: CAS EC 387
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

Concepts of health economics applicable to both developed and developing countries. Topics include effect of health on the economy, effect of health care on health, hospital behavior, health work-force supply, and demand for health care.

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COURSE: MET CS 432
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Provides a comprehensive overview of IT Project Management and the key processes associated with planning, organizing, and controlling of software projects. The course focuses on various knowledge areas such as project scope management, risk management, quality management, communications management, and integration management. Students are required to submit a term paper.

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COURSE: QST IS 223
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST SM 131).

Provides students with an understanding of the important role that information and information technology play in supporting the effective operation and management of business. Elaborates on the themes of “place to space” and the implications for business of the digital enterprise. Focuses on learning IS concepts in the context of application to real business problems.

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COURSE: CAS PO 171 / CAS IR 271
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Explores major issues in international relations, including conflict, cooperation, and governance. Addresses dominant international relations theories and their application. Investigates state system, international law and organization, transnational actors, state behavior, and globalization.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS CS 103
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to the basic architecture and protocols underlying the operation of the Internet with an emphasis on Web design, Web application programming, and algorithmic thinking. General familiarity with the Internet is assumed.

Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Digital/Multimedia Expression.

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COURSE: QST LA 245
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (QST SM 131) or sophomore standing.

Provides a broad overview of the American judicial system and fundamental legal issues. Examines dispute resolution, torts, contracts, criminal law, business organizations, employment law, intellectual property, and international law. The goal is to understand not only the basic rules of law but also the underlying social policies and ethical dilemmas.

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COURSE: CAS MA 142
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Systems of linear equations; matrices. Vector spaces and linear transformations. Determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Applications.

Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 242, CAS MA 442, or ENG EK 103.

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COURSE: QST SM 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

A broad introduction to the nature and activities of business enterprises within the United States’ economic and political framework. Course content introduces economic systems, essential elements of business organization, production, human resource management, marketing, finance, and risk management. Key objectives of the course are development of business vocabulary and a fundamental understanding of how businesses make money. This course is intended for non-business majors.

It may not be taken by Questrom students for credit nor can it be used by Boston University students toward the Business Administration minor.

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COURSE: CAS NE 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to the biological basis of behavior and cognition. Includes theoretical and practical foundations rooted in psychology, biology, neuropharmacology, and clinical sciences (e.g., neurology and neuropsychiatry). Neuroethical dilemmas are highlighted and integrated when relevant to discussion topics.

Carries natural sciences divisional credit without lab in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Scientific Inquiry I.

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COURSE: CAS MA 341
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS MA 242) or consent of instructor.

Study of integers and basic results of number theory. Topics include Linear Diophantine equations, prime numbers and factorization, congruences, and quadratic reciprocity.

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COURSE: CFA AR 143
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

For students with little or no experience in painting. Work in oil technique to study problems of design, form in space, and color.

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COURSE: CAS PH 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduces the nature of philosophical activity through careful study of major philosophical topics. Topics may include the nature of reality, knowledge, God’s existence, and the significance of human life.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CFA AR 251
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Survey of basic printmaking techniques with emphasis on relief processes and basic intaglio processes. Concepts of design, image development, color layering and experimentation, and markmaking are emphasized. Studio projects and lectures.

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COURSE: MET CS 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduction to problem-solving methods and algorithm development. Includes procedural and data abstractions, program design, debugging, testing, and documentation. Covers data types, control structures, functions, parameter passing, library functions, and arrays. Laboratory exercises in Python.

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COURSE: CAS RN 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Religion matters. It makes meaning and provides structure to life, addressing fundamental questions about body, spirit, community, and time. But what is it? How does it work in our world? This course explores religion in ritual, philosophical, experiential, and ethical dimensions.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Creativity/Innovation.

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COURSE: SED RS 600
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduces students to social science research methods including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed method approaches to education inquiry. Students will develop skills in conducting literature searches, reading empirical research studies and applying these methods. Students leave the course better able to critically examine research presented in the mass media, critically engage with research in the workplace, and participate in research-based efforts to improve education.

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COURSE: ENG EC 327
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (ENG EK 127 or ENG EK 128).

Introduction to software design, programming techniques, data structures, and software engineering principles. The course is structured bottom up, beginning with basic hardware followed by an understanding of machine language that controls the hardware and the assembly language that organizes that control. It proceeds through fundamental elements of functional programming languages, using C as the case example, and continues with the principles of object-oriented programming, as principally embodied in C++ but also its daughter languages Java, C#, and objective C. The course concludes with an introduction to elementary data structures and algorithmic analysis. Throughout, the course develops core competencies in software engineering, including programming style, optimization, debugging, compilation, and program management, utilizing a variety of Integrated Development Environments and operating systems.

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COURSE: SED SE 706
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Improves students’ understanding of individuals with disabilities, traces the development of their programs and services, and analyzes and critiques key assumptions, attitudes, and beliefs about special education practices.

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COURSE: CAS MA 583
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 581 or CAS MA 381) or consent of instructor.

Basic concepts and techniques of stochastic process as they are most often used to construct models for a variety of problems of practical interest. Topics include Markov chains, Poisson process, birth and death processes, queuing theory, renewal processes, and reliability.

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COURSE: SHA HF 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This introductory course is open to all BU students and is the prerequisite for School of Hospitality courses. Students gain an historical perspective and identify current events and trends in lodging, restaurants, and event management. The course provides an overview of the global hospitality/tourism industry, including the critical elements of managing services. The Boston market, multimedia assignments, and team-based projects are integrated into the learning environment.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Digital/Multimedia Expression, Teamwork/Collaboration.

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COURSE: CAS EC 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The second semester of a standard two-semester sequence for those considering further work in management or economics. National economic performance; the problems of recession, unemployment, and inflation; money creation; government spending and taxation; economic policies for full employment and price stability; and international trade and payments.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Social Inquiry I, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS EC 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The first semester of a standard two-semester sequence for those considering further work in management or economics. Coverage includes economics of households, business firms, and markets; consumer behavior and the demand for commodities; production, costs, and the supply of commodities; price determination; competition and monopoly; efficiency of resource allocation; governmental regulation; income distribution; and poverty. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS MA 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

An immersion experience in mathematical thinking and mathematical habits of mind. Students investigate topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry starting from basic elementary material and leading to an overview of current research topics.

Does not satisfy MCS Divisional requirement. Does satisfy CAS WR 150 requirement. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Writing: Research & Inquiry, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: QST FE 445
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323). Required for Finance concentrators.

Introduction to the investment management process. Defining investment objectives and constraints. Introduction to Modern Portfolio Theory, CAPM, APT, Efficient Markets, and stock and bond valuation models. Immunizing interest-rate risk. Active vs. passive investment strategies, fundamental vs. technical analysis, trading practices, and performance evaluation. Introduction to the role of futures and options in hedging and speculation. Students are expected to become familiar with current events in the financial news.

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COURSE: QST FE 454
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (QST FE 323).

Provides an overview of the economic functions provided by investment banks including a history of the industry, current events, and the difference between large, full service investment banks and smaller, boutique firms. Heavy emphasis on pro forma analysis and Initial Public Offering and M&A valuation techniques. Topics include: What do investment bankers do? What are the different types of analyses performed by investment bankers? What are the various types of financial securities? What is the underwriting process and how are securities priced? How are companies valued? How are potential synergies valued? The course focuses on the issuing process and pricing for equity, fixed income, and equity-linked securities. The course also focuses on the role of investment banks in mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, and other restructurings. Additional topics include equity research, capital markets industry regulations, as well as typical career paths and opportunities.

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COURSE: CAS AH 220
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines key monuments of Islamic art and architecture within their historical and cultural context, and emphasizes the diversity within the visual cultures of the Islamic world.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: SED BI 620
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Focus on complexity of bilingualism, literacy, and schooling from a student, school, and socio-political perspective. Examines the theoretical, historical, research, and legal bases of educational policy and programs for students who speak a language other than the language of the school.

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COURSE: CAS LI 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

For students who have never studied Italian, or by placement test results. Introduction to grammatical structures used in written exercises. Emphasis on aural comprehension, speaking, and pronunciation. Readings on contemporary Italian culture. Meets four days a week. Lab required.

(If CAS LI 131 or a more advanced college-level course has been completed, this course cannot be taken for credit.)

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COURSE: CAS LI 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS LI 111) or placement test results.

Continues study of basic grammatical structures used in written assignments. Emphasis on speaking, aural comprehension, and pronunciation. Readings on contemporary Italian culture. Meets four days a week. Lab required.

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COURSE: CAS LI 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS LI 112) or placement test results.

Intended for students with a satisfactory background in elementary Italian who wish to continue study of grammatical structures. Emphasis on speaking, pronunciation, and aural comprehension. Reading about Italian culture and contemporary short stories. Compositions and oral assessments including interviews and/or presentations.

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COURSE: CAS LJ 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to spoken and written Japanese and to fundamentals of Japanese grammar with oral drills and written exercises.

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COURSE: CAS LJ 112
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS LJ 111) or equivalent.

Introduction to spoken and written Japanese and to fundamentals of Japanese grammar with oral drills and written exercises.

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COURSE: CAS LJ 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS LJ 112) or equivalent.

Elaboration and refinement of the fundamental skills introduced in CAS LJ 111 and LJ 112 with an introduction to reading and composition.

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COURSE: CAS LJ 212
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS LJ 211) or equivalent.

Elaboration and refinement of the fundamental skills introduced in CAS LJ 111 and LJ 112 with an introduction to reading and composition. Satisfactory completion of CAS LJ 212 fulfills the CAS language requirement.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS LK 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

For beginners or according to placement exam. Fundamentals of Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing.

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COURSE: CAS CL 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduction to grammar, forms, and vocabulary of classical Latin.

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COURSE: CAS AH 242
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Surveys Latin American art from the colonial period to present and relates it to imperial, state, institutional, and private agendas. Interrogates both notions of art within colonial/neo-colonial contexts and changing roles of artists over past half-millennia.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

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COURSE: COM JO 350
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This interactive course introduces the core legal and ethical issues affecting how journalists, including the student press, gather, verify, and communicate news. This course offers an exciting deep-dive into the key concepts affecting newsgathering and dissemination today. Students discover the underpinnings of a free press as well as practical tools to use when confronted with government efforts to block legitimate newsgathering. Students gain a working knowledge of how and why the First Amendment protects them as they gather, verify, and disseminate the news. Required of all undergraduate journalism majors.

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COURSE: CAS PO 320
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in American Politics. Investigates the judiciary’s role in the policy making process. Compares the courts with other political institutions and explores how they differ in their policy-making role. The objective is to develop an understanding of the courts as political actors.

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COURSE: CAS MA 242
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Matrix algebra, solution of linear systems, determinants, Gaussian elimination, fundamental theory, row-echelon form. Vector spaces, bases, norms. Computer methods. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, canonical decomposition. Applications.

Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 142, MA 442, or ENG EK 102.

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COURSE: CAS CS 542
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to modern machine learning concepts, techniques, and algorithms. Topics include regression, kernels, support vector machines, feature selection, boosting, clustering, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian networks. Programming assignments emphasize taking theory into practice, through applications on real-world data sets.

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COURSE: QST ES 275
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS WR 100, QST FE 101, & QST SM 131). Sophomore standing. Questrom students only.

Persuasive written and oral communications are essential skills that are required for success in every business discipline. In this course, students learn how to communicate clearly and persuasively. Course objectives include learning how to inspire action through compelling, high-impact communications by taking a point of view and supporting it with logic and evidence, generating insights with meaningful conclusions and recommendations, and understanding and applying the principles of logical reasoning to organize information and lead an audience to action.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing, Research, and Inquiry, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: QST AC 222
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (QST AC 221) and (QST QM 221, previous or concurrent, highly recommended). Sophomore requirement.

Introduces the basic principles, methods, and challenges of modern managerial accounting. Covers traditional topics such as job-order costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting and variance analysis, profitability analysis, relevant costs for decision making, and cost-plus pricing, as well as emerging topics such as Activity-Based Cost (ABC) accounting. The material is examined from the perspective of students preparing to use management accounting information as managers, to support decision making (such as pricing, product mix, sourcing, and technology decisions) and short- and long-term planning, and to measure, evaluate, and reward performance. Emphasizes the relationships between accounting techniques and other organizational activities (such as strategy and motivation).

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COURSE: COM CM 522
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM CM 215 or COM CM 301). Grad Prereq: (COM CM 701).

Review and diagnosis of major crises and issues affecting corporations. Case discussions of five types of crises: technological, confrontational, malevolence, management failure, and management control. Examines appropriate management actions and communications before, during, and after a crisis. Reviews issues management: monitoring, analysis, strategy determination, and implementation.

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COURSE: CAS EC 332
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 201).

Structure of the American economy. The theory of imperfect competition. Topics include firm concentration and conglomeration, consumer ignorance and market failure, and advertising and technological change as part of market performance.

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COURSE: COM CM 321
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduction to the philosophy and process of social-scientific research and the most common methods used to study mass communication. Includes a variety of research methods, an examination of data-analysis procedures, and an analysis of mass communication issues.

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COURSE: MET CJ 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in Criminal Justice. Starting in the 1980s, America experienced an unprecedented increase in the use of incarceration as a form of punishment. Although criminal justice reform movements and policy changes have recently slowed the growth in America’s prison population, America’s incarceration rate remains among the highest in the world. This course investigates the social, political, and historical roots of the mass incarceration “experiment,” and examines the consequences it has had and continues to have on individuals, families, communities, governments, and society. The course also focuses on the implications that mass incarceration has on the operation, management, and leadership of correctional agencies. Students will assess and debate public policy options for further reform. Class discussions include specialized experts from a variety of perspectives and evaluation of prominent readings that have taken stock of America’s experience with mass incarceration over the past several decades.

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COURSE: SED ME 504
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Grad Prereq: (SED ME 503).

Designed for students majoring in elementary education, special education and deaf education who are preparing to become teachers of children in grades 1-6. Topics include pre-algebra, proportional reasoning, geometry, measurement, and statistics. The emphasis is on exploring, explaining, and justifying mathematical ideas and connecting these ideas to the elementary classroom.

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COURSE: SED ME 503
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Designed for students majoring in elementary education, special education, and deaf education who are preparing to become teachers of children in grades 1-6. Topics include place value, whole numbers and operations, fractions, decimals, and elementary number theory. The emphasis is on exploring, explaining, and justifying mathematical ideas and connecting these ideas to the elementary classroom.

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COURSE: CAS MA 582
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 581 or CAS MA 381).

Point estimation including unbiasedness, efficiency, consistency, sufficiency, minimum variance unbiased estimator, Rao-Blackwell theorem, and Rao-Cramer inequality. Maximum likelihood and method of moment estimations; interval estimation; tests of hypothesis, uniformly most powerful tests, uniformly most powerful unbiased tests, likelihood ratio test, and chi-square test.

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COURSE: ENG ME 305
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (ENG EK 301 & ENG EK 103 & CAS MA 226).

Introduction to stress and strain. Axial and shear loading. Torsion of shafts and thin-walled tubes. Stress within and deflection of bending beams. Combined loadings. Stress and strain transformations. Generalized Hooke’s law. Material failure theories. Column buckling. Includes lab and project. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

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COURSE: COM CM 441
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (COM CM 215 or COM CM 301) and (COM CM 331).

Students study a variety of publicity tactics (news conferences, feature placements, special events, and media tours), which they combine into publicity campaign plans. Involves lectures, in-class discussions, video cases, and individual take-home cases. Students are encouraged to plan campaigns in their area of interest (e.g., business, arts, sports, and politics).

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COURSE: CAS AN 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This lecture and discussion-driven course uses ethnographic case materials and active learning strategies to introduce students to socio-cultural anthropological modes of understanding and analyzing health-related experiences and institutions, including political and ethical dimensions of illness and suffering around the globe.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, Ethical Reasoning, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS PH 251
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Surveys ethical issues that arise in connection with medicine and emerging biotechnologies. The course examines topics such as the right to healthcare, research on human subjects, euthanasia, abortion, cloning, genetic selection, disabilities, and the biomedical enhancement of human capacities. Students can expect to gain not only training in the concepts and methods of moral philosophy and the logic of argumentation, but also the resources needed for assessing ethically difficult questions that healthcare professionals routinely face.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: QST QM 222
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST QM 221 & CAS EC 101). Sophomore standing.

Examines the use of economic and statistical tools for making business decisions. Topics include optimization (including linear programming), multiple regression, demand modeling, cost modeling, industry analysis (including models of perfect competition, monopoly, and oligopoly), and game theory. Emphasizes modeling with spreadsheets.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: CAS MA 541
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Basic properties of groups, Sylow theorems, basic properties of rings and ideals, Euclidean rings, polynomial rings.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LJ 283
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

In English translation. Japanese film from the silent era to contemporary animation, with attention to the intersection of cinematic and cultural analysis and genres such as yakuza movies. Directors studied may include Ozu, Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and Miyazaki Hayao.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS BI 552
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CASBI203 or CASBI213) and (CASBI206 or CASBI216).

How cells synthesize biologically important macromolecules (DNA, RNA and proteins), as well as their structure, function and regulation. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic molecular biology is discussed. Topics include: DNA replication, DNA repair, recombination, prokaryotic transcription, translation, eukaryotic transcription/RNA processing, DNaseI hypersensitive sites, 5-methylcytosine, eukaryotic RNA polymerase structure/CTD modification, eukaryotic promoter structure, general transcription factors, enhancer-promoter loops, histone modification/chromatin remodeling, and non- coding RNA. Discussion of important molecular biological techniques, such as genetic and recombinant DNA techniques, including CRISPR/Cas9. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS EC 341
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS EC 202).

Survey of commercial and central banking institutions. Examination of macro relations between financial organizations and principal objectives of stabilization policy.

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COURSE: QST FE 442
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323). Required for Finance concentrators.

The financial system and its functions. The role of money and the importance of interest rates in determining economic activity; determinants of level of interest rates. Operation of central banks; the goals and instruments of monetary policy. The roles, activities, and risk management of financial institutions. Instruments traded in money and capital markets, and their valuation. Role of derivative securities; systemic risk and other contemporary issues in the financial system.

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COURSE: SED CE 741
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A historical, philosophical, and clinical examination of subcultural considerations in counseling psychology professional practice and inquiry.

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COURSE: CAS MA 225
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 124 or CAS MA 127 or CAS MA 129).

Vectors, lines, planes. Multiple integration, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Partial derivatives, directional derivatives, scalar and vector fields, the gradient, potentials, approximation, multivariate minimization, Stokes’s and related theorems.

Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 230. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning II.

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COURSE: SAR HS 441
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a group of viral, parasitic, and bacterial diseases that affect more than 1 billion people worldwide and disproportionately burden those with the fewest resources. They can cause significant disability, chronic illness, and death in both children and adults. This course provides an overview of each of the NTDs including transmission, disease progression, treatment, epidemiology, and control strategies. In addition, we examine their public health importance and the effects they have at the individual, community, and national level. We also discuss societal contexts and ethics around treatment, research, advocacy, and prevention.

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COURSE: MET MG 515
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

A communications skills course that explores the nature of conflict and its resolution through persuasion, collaboration, and negotiation. Students learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. Students assess their own styles, skills, and values, and develop techniques to better resolve disputes, achieve objectives, and exert influence.

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COURSE: CAS BI 594 / CAS NE 594
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: Any college-level neuroscience, psychology, or physiology course.

Exploration of the neuroscience of imagination from neurons to memory to neurological control of novel conscious experiences. The course covers what makes the brain and human language unique as well as the selectional forces that shaped the brains of our ancestors. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS PS 338
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 231 or CAS BI 325).

Survey of theoretical aspects and major empirical findings in human neuropsychology, including memory, language, spatial function, attention, emotion, and abstract thought. Emphasis is on the relation between brain disorders (resulting from head injury, stroke, degenerative disease, etc.) and abnormal behavior.

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COURSE: COM JO 200
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The goal of this course is for students to acquire fundamental newsgathering and writing skills needed to thrive as journalists working in any medium. The course is based in the classroom, but students are expected to learn and adhere to professional newsroom standards. The course focuses on essential practices and principles that apply to reporters, photographers, bloggers, producers, and editors across all media formats. The class emphasizes news judgment, storytelling and reporting skills, as well as writing clearly and quickly

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COURSE: CAS PO 328 / CAS IR 395
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Employs a multidisciplinary approach to analyze the relations between the industrialized nations of the “North” and the developing nations of the “South.” Addresses historical and current issues in North-South relations, including trade, investment, migration, regional economic integration, and the environment.

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COURSE: CAS CS 591
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Fundamental knowledge of programming and experience with a high-level programming language (i.e. Java, C++, Python), data structures and basic algorithms.)

Topics in Computer Science. Introduces principles and techniques of object-oriented programming. Focuses on specification, programming, analysis of large-scale, reliable, and reusable Java software using object-oriented design. Includes object models, memory models, inheritance, exceptions, namespaces, data abstraction, design against failure, design patterns, reasoning about objects.

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COURSE: CAS MA 569
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq:((CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230) & (CAS MA 242 or CAS MA 442)).

Optimization of linear functions: linear programming, simplex method; transportation, assignment, and network problems. Optimization of non-linear functions: unconstrained optima, constrained optima and Lagrange multipliers, Kuhn-Tucker conditions, calculus of variations, and Euler’s equation.

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COURSE: CAS CH 203
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 102 or CAS CH 110 or CAS CH 112). CAS CH 203 and CH 204 meet premedical requirements for organic chemistry.

Fundamentals of contemporary organic chemistry, including skeletal and electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups. Applications of organic reactions to important synthetic targets in materials and drug discovery are highlighted, as are reactions pertinent to biochemistry. Laboratory includes training in basic organic chemistry skills, such as extraction, reaction performance, spectroscopy interpretation, and chromatography. Students must register for four sections: lecture, discussion, prelab, and laboratory.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 204
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS CH 203).

Fundamentals of contemporary chemistry, including electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and multistep synthesis. Laboratory includes extraction, reactions, spectroscopy, and chromatography. Students must register for four sections: lecture, discussion, prelab, and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 220
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS CH 204).

Laboratory methods in organic chemistry including multistep synthesis, organic qualitative analysis, and instrumental analysis. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory. Meets with CAS CH 214 prelab and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 205
CREDITS: 3 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 102) or equivalent.

Fundamentals of contemporary organic chemistry, including skeletal and electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups. Applications of organic reactions to important synthetic targets in materials and drug discovery are highlighted, as are reactions pertinent to biochemistry.

Not acceptable for credit toward the chemistry major or minor. For students who do not require laboratory credit. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS CH 206
CREDITS: 3 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS CH 203 or CAS CH 205).

Fundamentals of contemporary chemistry, including electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and multistep synthesis.

Not acceptable for credit toward the chemistry major or minor. For students who do not require laboratory credit. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS CH 214
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS CH 203).

Fundamentals of contemporary chemistry, including electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and multistep synthesis. Laboratory includes extraction, reactions, spectroscopy, and chromatography.

Students must register for four sections: lecture, discussion, prelab, and laboratory. Lecture and discussion sections meet with CAS CH 204 lecture and discussion sections. This course with the more advanced lab is suitable for chemistry or BMB concentrators.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: SAR HP 353
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: First-Year Writing Seminar.

The focus of this interdisciplinary course is on increasing students’ understanding of the health care system and ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and on the social, environmental, and behavioral factors that affect health care. Students will actively engage in individual work, group discussion, and teamwork through written, oral, and website assignments.

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COURSE: MET MG 202
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

The development of personal investment strategies using money and credit. Securities and portfolio management, budgeting, insurance, taxes, retirement programs, and estate planning.

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COURSE: CFA AR 415
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Designed to assist the student in mastering the techniques of black and white photography, including negative exposure, film development, and print production. Critical evaluation of photographs, relationship of photography to other visual media, and study of both historical and contemporary precedents. No previous experience is required, but access to a 35mm camera with manual exposure capability is necessary. Material costs are extra.

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COURSE: SAR PT 515
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (SAR HS 369 or SAR HS 581). Coreq: (SAR PT 520).

Designed to teach the process of examination by physical therapists. Selected measurement tools used for examination of individuals in order to establish a physical therapy diagnosis are taught. A Systems Approach to examination is introduced and models of disablement are used to guide the process. The course is taught in conjunction with SAR PT 520, Functional Anatomy, and directly applies content learned in that course. DPT students only. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

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COURSE: CAS IR 527 / CAS PO 548
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: junior standing or consent of instructor.

How did China implement economic reform? What were the progresses and limitations? How is China’s political-economic development influencing the global system? Discussions are conducted in a comparative perspective. Countries of reference include Japan and India.

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COURSE: CAS PH 155
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

What is justice? What are the foundations of property rights, liberty, and equality? Are anarchism and utopianism defensible? This course is an introduction to major themes and questions in political philosophy. It includes a study of classical and modern texts, as well as contemporary political issues.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: COM CM 215
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to the field of public relations: its theoretical origins, scope, and principles. Discussion focuses on researching problems, setting objectives, identifying audiences, designing messages, choosing communication channels, and evaluating results for all types of organizations. Ethical decision making, on-line communication, and career opportunities are also analyzed case studies in the field. The format is a combination of informal lecture and small-group discussion, case analysis, and guest lecture.

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COURSE: CAS SO 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

An introduction to the major theories and basic principles of sociological analysis. Explores culture, media, socialization, race and ethnicity, globalization, capitalism, gender and sexuality, inequality and poverty, power in American society, and health and medicine from a sociological perspective.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Individual in Community, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS CH 373
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108 or CAS NE 102 or ENG BE 208) and (CAS CH 204 or CAS CH 214 or CAS CH 212 or CAS CH 174) or equivalent.

Introductory biochemistry focusing on structure/function with applications to medicine, nutrition, and biotechnology, including acid/base chemistry, protein structure, enzyme mechanisms, thermodynamics, and kinetics; nucleic acid structure/function, lipids and carbohydrates; bioenergetics of glycolysis and oxidative energy metabolism; lipid and nitrogen metabolism. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a discussion.

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COURSE: CAS CH 171
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to chemistry: separation and purification of matter, atomic theory, structure of atoms, molecules and chemical bonding, chemical formulas, equations, stoichiometry; water, solutions, concentration, acids, bases, pH and buffers; gases; reaction kinetics and equilibrium, and radioactivity. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 325
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 203) or consent of instructor.

Fundamentals of the nervous system, emphasizing synaptic transmission; hierarchical organization; autonomic nervous system; mechanisms of sensory perception; reflexes and motor function; biorhythms; and neural mechanisms of feeding, mating, learning, and memory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: QST QM 221
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Exposes students to the fundamentals of probability, decision analysis, and statistics, and their application to business. Topics include probability, decision analysis, distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, and chi-square.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Quantitative Reasoning I.

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COURSE: CAS MA 581
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (CAS MA 225 or CAS MA 230) or consent of instructor.

Basic probability, conditional probability, independence. Discrete and continuous random variables, mean and variance, functions of random variables, moment generating function. Jointly distributed random variables, conditional distributions, independent random variables. Methods of transformations, law of large numbers, central limit theorem.

Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS MA 381.

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COURSE: CAS CS 237
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CS 131).

Introduction to basic probabilistic concepts and methods used in computer science. Develops an understanding of the crucial role played by randomness in computing, both as a powerful tool and as a challenge to confront and analyze. Emphasis on rigorous reasoning, analysis, and algorithmic thinking.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: SED ME 563
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Explores the teaching and learning of mathematics through solving sets of challenging problems. Topics include research on problem solving and how its design and implementation can be supported in the classroom.

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COURSE: COM FT 353
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (COM FT 201) with a grade of B- or higher.

An intensive course in all the fundamental aspects of motion picture production. Students learn to use cameras, sound recording equipment, and editing software and then apply these skills to several short productions. Emphasizes the language of visual storytelling and the creative interplay of sound and image.

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COURSE: COM CM 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Students learn the essentials of effective presentation, from preparation, audience analysis, and content development to critical thinking when presenting. Students will incorporate theories and skills of effective communication in a variety of contexts (e.g., common business and social settings).

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Oral and/or Signed Communication.

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COURSE: MET CS 231
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (MET CS 201) or instructor’s consent.

Covers the elements of object-oriented programming and the C++ language. Data types, control structures, functions, library functions, classes, inheritance, and multiple inheritance. Use of constructors, destructors, function and operator overloading, reference parameters and default values, friend functions, input and output streams, templates, and exceptions.

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COURSE: MET CS 232
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Prereq: (MET CS 201) or instructor’s consent.

Covers the elements of object-oriented programming and the Java Programming Language. Primitive data types, control structures, methods, classes, arrays and strings, inheritance and polymorphism, interfaces, creating user interfaces, applets, exceptions and streams.

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COURSE: MET MG 415
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examination of project management concepts, including organizational forms, planning and control techniques, and the role of the project manager. Develops the skills vital to effective management of multidisciplinary tasks through lectures, case studies, and business simulations.

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COURSE: COM CM 502 / COM FT 521
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Teaches students how to market their creative works online. Students learn to identify targeted marketing and distribution platforms for new websites, video channels, series, and blogs, and how to use social media to find an audience, generate buzz, and identify potential funding sources. Students also learn practical entrepreneurial tools needed to organize their creative work as a business venture.

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COURSE: CAS PS 234
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

How do we learn to associate stimuli together? How do we learn to associate behaviors with their consequences? How is memory applicable to learning? What are the different memory processes and systems responsible for learning? The aim of this course is to review the major traditional and current theories of learning and memory. Students begin with an understanding of simple learning, including theories and basic principles of classical and operant conditioning. Students then are introduced to the memory system, the three stages of memory, implicit and explicit memory processes.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS PS 251
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Emphasizes the historical development of personality theories and their application to social and clinical concerns. Classic theories of personality (e.g., psychoanalytical, behavioral, trait, humanistic, cognitive, and social roles) are explored and evaluated through lectures, readings, and case materials. A consideration of trait-based approaches and personality disorder with regards to DSM 5 criteria is also included.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: MET UA 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Urban Affairs. Since the mid-1800s, scientists and researchers have continuously shown how public policies significantly impact the health of individuals now and in the future. Through readings, case studies, guest lectures, and in-class exercises, students learn about the lasting impacts of many of these policies. Students are also introduced to a variety of strategies used to design interventions that target urban problems and to the role of evidence in the policymaking process. This course is well suited for curious students with an introductory background in planning, public health, and related fields.

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COURSE: CAS CH 201
CREDITS: 2 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 102).

Principles of quantitative analysis and instrumental analysis. Introduction to error analysis, basic statistics, quantitative lab skills, basic statistics, acid-base chemistry, chromatography, and electronic spectroscopy (atomic and molecular UV, AAS). Lab exercises apply concepts in redox chemistry, acid/base reactions, transition metal chemistry, and other general chemistry topics. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS PO 300
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in American Politics. How do Americans think about race and how does attitude influence political preferences? Students first look into traditional understandings of race and public opinion and then examine recent developments promising to change the role of racial attitudes in American Politics.

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COURSE: SED LR 551
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

For beginning graduate students without experience in the teaching of reading. Study of reading development in childhood and early adolescence, and the implications for teaching and learning. Discussion of theory and research on effective instruction and assessment, and the application of both to teaching.

Not open to students who have completed SED LR 501 or SED LR 503.

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COURSE: CAS EN 125
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: First Year Writing Seminar (e.g., WR 100 or WR 120).

Introduces key concepts for understanding major developments in modern literature. Readings in poetry, drama, and fiction from varying traditions, designed to motivate an interest in some of the most engaging, and challenging, works of our time. Topics vary by instructor.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Writing- intensive Course.

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COURSE: QST FE 469
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (QST FE 323).

Provides an introduction to and an understanding of real estate finance. Draws together and considers major functional areas including: structuring, ownership, finance, taxation, property valuation, and analysis. The course provides a framework for decision making in the real estate investment and finance fields. The course is specifically designed to offer students interested in real estate careers a foundation upon which to build.

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COURSE: CAS PH 160
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

A systematic study of the principles of both deductive and informal reasoning, calculated to enhance students’ actual reasoning skills, with an emphasis on reasoning and argumentation in ordinary discourse. We will emphasize argumentation and criticism in ordinary life and also present formal models of reasoning designed to elicit underlying patterns and structures of reasoning and argumentation that are widely applicable. Includes simultaneous training in the skills of argument analysis, argument pattern recognition, argument construction, and argument interpretation and creation.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS IR 337 / CAS PO 379 / CAS RN 379
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to the comparative study of the political role of religious institutions and beliefs. Covers issues such as religion’s relationship to violence and terrorism, democracy and human rights, group identity, gender and sexuality, and modernity and secularism.

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COURSE: CAS RN 103
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Study of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. Focus on the world view of each tradition and the historical development of that world view.

Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: COM JO 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq:(COM CO 201) and (COM JO 200 or JO 250).

This course helps students advance their reporting skills by covering a city neighborhood or a topical beat. Students branch out across the city and suburbs to cover courts, crime, education, local and state politics, and other essentials of community reporting. Students develop their own sources and story ideas with the goal of professional publication in the department-managed news service or another news site. The purpose is to hone reporting skills, develop sources, and build both competence and confidence. Students produce stories, photos, audio and video for the Web. Class is run like a newsroom, and students are encouraged to show enterprise.

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COURSE: CFA ME 538
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Students participate in small rock ensembles and examine the pedagogy of that type of ensemble. Lectures and demonstrations include topics such as equipment selection, repertoire selection, and performance techniques. An additional emphasis is on techniques for amplifying rock ensembles. Students also learn fundamental techniques for recording rock ensembles

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COURSE: COM FT 201
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

In this course, students study and practice the art and craft of expressing themselves persuasively through audio-visual media. The aim is both to familiarize students with the conventions of screen language and to test the validity of those norms.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Digital/Multimedia Expression, Creativity/Innovation.

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COURSE: CAS LC 287
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Major Chinese films interpreted in light of modern Chinese history and culture. Focuses on questions of national and cultural identity in films from the 1980s to the present day by directors from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. In English.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS EN 220
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Friendship is essential to many of our lives. But ideas about friendship have changed over time. To take one famous example, Tennyson’s oft-quoted lines “‘Tis better to have loved and lost/ Than never to have loved,” were written about a close friend. What is the nature of such love? This course explores literary languages of friendship from Renaissance depictions of the “friend zone,” to Victorian frenemies, to the often-fractured landscape of contemporary America. Authors may include Shakespeare, Austen, Oscar Wilde, August Wilson, Frank O’Hara, and Jim Jarmusch.

Required of concentrators in English. Satisfies CAS WR 150 requirement. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Writing, Research and Inquiry, Research and Information Literacy.

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COURSE: CAS AN 260
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Cross-cultural examination of changing gender roles, expectations, and activities. Focuses on economic, social, political, and ideological determinants that structure the hierarchy of power and privileges accorded the thoughts, activities, and experiences of women and men in various societies.

Counts towards the Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies minor. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

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COURSE: CAS SO 240
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to sociological perspectives on sexuality. Historical and comparative analysis of sexuality, with a focus on the social and cultural institutions that shape sexuality in the contemporary U.S.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS EN 363
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Six plays chosen from the following: Richard II, Henry IV (Part I), Troilus and Cressida, As You Like It, Hamlet, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Winter’s Tale.

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COURSE: CAS EN 364
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Six or seven plays chosen from the following: Richard III, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, Coriolanus, and The Tempest.

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COURSE: CAS PS 261
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Provides an understanding of how behavior, feelings, and thoughts of individuals are influenced and determined by characteristics of a situation. Topics include attraction, attitudes, prejudice, social rules, aggression, person perception, and groups. Readings cover theories, experimental research, and application.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

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COURSE: CAS SO 215
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Social, cultural, and intercultural factors in health and illness. Training and socialization of medical professionals, roots of medical power and authority, organization and operation of health care facilities. U.S. health care system and its main problems. Comparison of health care systems in the U.S. and in other countries.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning.

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COURSE: CAS AA 207 / CAS SO 207
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Social definition of race and ethnicity. The adjustment of different ethnic groups and their impact upon U.S. social life. How prejudice and discrimination create class identities and how caste relations have affected patterns of integration during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

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COURSE: CAS AA 335 / CAS SO 335 / CAS WS 335
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: at least one prior 100- or 200-level sociology course, CAS WS 101/102, or consent of the instructor.

Examines race, class, gender, and sexuality as intersecting axes of stratification, identity, and experience. Draws heavily from feminist theories in both sociology and history in order to analyze how these intersections can be applied to understanding social problems and structures.

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COURSE: CAS LS 111
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2