January in Auckland, New Zealand

Spend 6 weeks studying in the heart of Auckland. Choose from a wide range of courses in the areas of Arts, Business, Education, Humanities, Languages, Law, Sciences, Social Sciences and more!

Program Overview

During your January in Auckland program you will be a student at New Zealand’s top university, ranked among the top 100 universities worldwide.

Your New Home – Auckland has a rich cosmopolitan mix of people. It is New Zealand’s largest city and is the centre of the country’s retail and commercial activities. Its harbourside location is known as the “City of Sails” because of the great number of yachts that sail in the harbours and the adjoining Hauraki Gulf.

World-renowned University – The University of Auckland has been ranked No. 1 for two consecutive years in the University Impact Rankings by Times Higher Education (THE).

The Great Outdoors – The city is surrounded by 48 volcanoes and numerous picturesque islands. To the west of the city, the Waitakere Ranges rainforest forms a gateway to magnificent west coast surf beaches and an abundance of bush walks.

Events – Discover the range of entertainment, sport and recreation possibilities Auckland has to offer.

Highlights

Here are just some of the highlights to expect during your January in Auckland program:

  • Located in the heart of Lord of the Rings country
  • Beaches, mountains and wilderness right on your doorstep
  • Breathtaking national parks, dynamic Māori culture, and world-class surfing and skiing
  • Study courses at New Zealand’s top ranked university
  • Festivals, sporting events and concerts
  • Diverse, international student body
  • 6-week program with approximate equivalent credit for 1-2 standard courses (10-20 credit points) at your home university in Australia
  • Comprehensive program of co-curricular activities at no extra cost

Choose Your Course

This program takes place over 6 weeks between early-January and mid-February at the University of Auckland. The University is New Zealand’s pre-eminent research-led institution and is the highest ranked NZ university in the main world university rankings systems.

Course load: 1-2 courses (15-30 points) each equivalent to a full-time academic course in Australia. The condensed teaching format during this program means 30 points of courses equals at least a workload of 60 points (or more) of courses taken during a semester. It is recommended that students take 1 course (15 points) as students need to attend all lectures, tutorial and laboratory classes, and complete all set work, as well as a final examination (if applicable) in each course studied. It is estimated that for each hour in class, students will need to spend a minimum of 2 additional hours of reading and private study.

  • Depending on your Australian university, “courses” may be referred to as “subjects” or “units”.
  • Each course/subject/unit you undertake on a CISaustralia program is designed to be a full-time, semester course that has been condensed to fit into an intensive, short-term program. As such, for any 1 course you study abroad, you should receive the credit points for 1 full-time course/subject/unit at your Australian university.
  • Many universities work off of a 1-for-1 equivalency (1 course abroad = 1 course in Australia), but ultimately credit approval is the decision of your faculty and Australian university.
  • CISaustralia strongly recommends that you have any overseas courses pre-approved for academic credit before you depart for your program. Some documentation that may be useful are the course outline/syllabus, program overview and the contact hours.
  • It is best to get 2-3 courses approved before you go to NZ (4-5 courses approved if you plan to take 2 courses while in NZ). This gives you some flexibility in setting up your class schedule for the courses you will eventually take – and allows for a possible timetable clash. Think about courses required for your major, but also courses that fulfil your elective requirements.
  • Your CISaustralia Program Advisor can assist with any questions or details your university needs to make a decision.

While it is possible to undertake 2 courses during this program, due to the intense, condensed nature of the courses, it is not recommended. Additionally, due to the frequency of classes to fit condensed material into a shorter timeframe, it can be difficult to find 2 courses that do not having clashing timetables.

How to Choose Your Courses: Now the fun part! As part of the application process you will be required to complete a Course Selection Worksheet. The instructions will guide you through the steps of choosing your courses.

Academic Requirement: To qualify for this program, students must be in good academic standing with a GPA of 5.0 (out of 7) or equivalent. If your current GPA falls below the requirement, you may still be considered for the program but will need to provide supporting documentation including a recommendation letter from your home international office or academics. Please contact us to discuss your situation and we will work with you to help find another suitable program if required.

Course Offerings: Course descriptions below are from January 2021 and are subject to change for 2022. Confirmed January 2022 courses will be available approx. September 2021. It is best to have at least 2 backup courses selected in case your first choice is not offered in 2022 or you do not meet the pre-requisites for relevant courses.

COURSE: DANCE 207
CREDITS: 15 points

Focuses on the development and consolidation of choreographic and performance skills.

Prerequisite: Any 30 points at Stage I in Dance Studies

COURSE: DANCE 101
CREDITS: 15 points

To develop an understanding of our moving bodies through movement awareness, dance improvisation, choreography and creative and analytic writing. Students will undertake both theoretical and practical classes focusing on a range of practices that dancers and movement practitioners use to facilitate kinaesthetic awareness, experimentation, communication and choreography. Students will explore somatic theory and practice, improvisation scores, choreography and dance analysis.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

COURSE: MUS 130
CREDITS: 15 points

A survey of the production technology available to assist musicians, and an introduction to modern music production. Topics include: Modern DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) functionality, MIDI and audio recording/editing, synthesis, and multi-track mixing.

COURSE: MUS 149
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to New Zealand’s home-grown popular music, from the 1950s to the present day. A broad range of musical styles will be considered and situated within various social contexts. The issue of cultural identity in music – at national and local levels – will also be explored.

COURSE: MUS 144
CREDITS: 15 points

A study of significant people, major discoveries and inventions, and key factors (artistic, intellectual, social, technical) that were important agents of change in Western music. No previous knowledge of music is assumed.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

COURSE: FINEARTS 210G
CREDITS: 15 points

How does the contemporary art world work? Premised on the idea that there are many art worlds, this course examines global and local contemporary artistic practices, theories, histories and institutions, exploring the practices and discourses that constitute these worlds. No prior knowledge or experience of contemporary art is assumed.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ACCTG 102
CREDITS: 15 points

Basic principles and concepts of accounting that underlie the production of information for internal and external reporting. This course provides the technical platform for second year courses in financial and management accounting, finance, and accounting information systems.

COURSE: BUSINESS 114
CREDITS: 15 points

Examines how understanding financial, non-financial and legal information is critical to business decision making. Considers the accounting and legal requirements, issues and mechanisms that impact management of an organisation. Develops skills in analysing, interpreting and communicating accounting information.

COURSE: LAWPUBL 467
CREDITS: 15 points

The global significance of corruption and its implications for self-government are explored within the context of rising economic and political inequality and illiberal populism. This course asks whether anti-corruption law can respond to democracy’s vulnerabilities and decline. It examines current economic and political trends, anti-corruption law domestically and internationally, and the potential for enhancing the law to better-protect political integrity.

COURSE: INTBUS 151
CREDITS: 15 points

Business on a global scale presents unique challenges and unrivalled opportunities to companies equipped to cross national boundaries. Set against a background of current events, the course explores the influence of international trade and multinational corporations on the contemporary global economy.

COURSE: BUSINESS 151G
CREDITS: 15 points

Communication knowledge and skills are essential in business careers and for interpersonal and intercultural relationships. This course offers a theory-based approach combined with applied communication practices. Communication knowledge, competencies and skills are developed through exploring relationships, mediated communication, writing, team dynamics, oral presentation and technologies.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LAWCOMM 457
CREDITS: 15 points

An in-depth examination of selected aspects of consumer law, including (but not limited to) misleading and deceptive conduct, other unfair practices, unfair contract terms in standard form consumer contracts, consumer guarantees and uninvited direct sales.

COURSE: ACCTG 221
CREDITS: 15 points

Budgets and standards, costing systems, cost information for decision-making and control, performance appraisal, and contemporary related issues.

COURSE: STATS 208
CREDITS: 15 points

A practical course in the statistical analysis of data. There is a heavy emphasis in this course on the interpretation and communication of statistical findings. Topics such as exploratory data analysis, the analysis of linear models including two-way analysis of variance, experimental design and multiple regression, the analysis of contingency table data including logistic regression, the analysis of time series data, and model selection will be covered.

COURSE: INFOSYS 222
CREDITS: 15 points

Managers and other knowledge workers find that many of their duties revolve around accessing, organising, and presenting organisational and external information. The ability to develop and use computer databases is becoming a critical skill that is required in many disciplines. These skills are developed through an introduction to data modelling, relational theory, database design, and the management of databases.

COURSE: INFOSYS 110
CREDITS: 15 points

Explores how information systems and analytical tools help organisations to innovate, optimise and deliver value. Examines how the development and implementation of systems and technologies coordinate and manage information, people, and processes within data governance and privacy frameworks.

COURSE: LAWPUBL 445
CREDITS: 15 points

The law related to the European Union and its institutional, economic and social structure as well as the general economic and political implications of the present status of the European Union.

COURSE: FINANCE 251
CREDITS: 15 points

Focuses on practical aspects of corporate finance. Topics covered include: concepts of value creation, risk and required rates of return, financial maths, capital budgeting, capital structure and dividend policies.

COURSE: LAWENVIR 420
CREDITS: 15 points

Concepts, principles, customs, and treaties of international law as related to the protection of the global environment including: prevention of pollution, protection of the marine environment, ozone layer protection, climate change, biodiversity, the UNCED process and the legal framework for sustainable development.

COURSE: LAWGENRL 438
CREDITS: 15 points

An examination of the law and the policy considerations that relate to residential housing including: the historical development and current state of residential tenancy protection legislation; the relationship between social policy and housing regulation; human rights and social equity considerations; economic measures to achieve government policy objectives for housing; regulating the private rental market; property rights and security of tenure issues; ‘consumer protection’ measures to ensure safe and habitable housing; housing and natural disasters; retirement housing; new forms of housing ownership; and dispute resolution.

COURSE: LAWCOMM 437
CREDITS: 15 points

An examination of the common governance structures employed by iwi, why those structures are chosen and the legal and practical issues that arise as a result. Aspects of the law related to trusts, limited partnerships, charities and Māori Authorities, and how they may be interwoven within one overarching structure.

COURSE: LAW 121G
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to theories of the nature, functions and origins of law and legal systems, including sources of law; comparative concepts of law; an overview of constitutional and legal arrangements in New Zealand, including the role of the courts; the operation of the legal system in historical and contemporary New Zealand with a focus on concepts of property rights, the Treaty of Waitangi, Treaty Settlements and proposals for constitutional change.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

COURSE: COMLAW 101
CREDITS: 15 points

Decision makers in commerce and industry require an understanding of legal structures, concepts and obligations. Provides an introduction to the New Zealand legal system and the legal environment in which businesses operate, and also introduces legal concepts of property and the law of obligations, including detailed study of various forms of legal liability relevant to business.

COURSE: MKTG 202
CREDITS: 15 points

Focuses on the critical role and importance of information in marketing. Covers the fundamental concepts of marketing research in traditional and digital environments and examines how these can be used to assist companies in their decision-making.

COURSE: ECON 201
CREDITS: 15 points

Study of the allocation of scarce resources among competing end uses. Intermediate-level analysis of the economic behaviour of individual units, in particular consumers and firms. Although the focus is on perfectly competitive markets, attention is also given to other types of markets. Analysis also includes concepts of expected utility and uncertainty, and welfare economics.

COURSE: ECON 152
CREDITS: 15 points

Analysis of issues that affect our daily lives, including pricing decisions by firms and their impact on our cost of living; game theory and strategic decision-making; tackling problems of pollution and global warming; and how governments use monetary and fiscal policies to stimulate economic growth and address unemployment and inequality.

Prerequisite: BUSINESS 115 or ECON 151 or 16 credits in NCEA Level 3 Economics with a Merit average including standard 91399 (Demonstrate understanding of the efficiency of market equilibrium), or a scholarship pass in Economics, or B grade in CIE Economics or 4 out of 7 in Economics (HL) in IB

COURSE: LAWGENRL 457
CREDITS: 15 points

The rise of globalisation and technology has created complex litigation challenges for victims of mass harms nationally and internationally. This course examines comparative theoretical, ideological and economic policies which underpin complex litigation systems with a particular focus on the use of regulatory actions, class actions and litigation funding entities. It also examines major procedural and substantive issues that arise in the context of national and international complex civil litigation.

COURSE: STATS 108
CREDITS: 15 points

The standard Stage I Statistics course for the Faculty of Business and Economics or for Arts students taking Economics courses. Its syllabus is as for STATS 101, but it places more emphasis on examples from commerce.

COURSE: MGMT 302
CREDITS: 15 points

Examines the processes of formulating and implementing strategies, and the critical thinking behind the multifaceted role of organisations in complex business environments. Focuses on strategy issues in and between a range of commercial and public organisations, from entrepreneurial firms to multinational corporations.

COURSE: MKTG 203
CREDITS: 15 points

A comprehensive overview of the central principles and concepts of marketing strategy and management. Highlights the challenges that marketing managers face in planning and implementing effective marketing mix strategies.

COURSE: BUSINESS 111
CREDITS: 15 points

Business involves creating and capturing value through innovation and entrepreneurship. Develops an understanding of customers and markets, and the legal, economic and social environment within which business operates, nationally and globally. Develops personal and professional capabilities needed in business, including strategies to manage self and work effectively with others.

COURSE: MGMT 223
CREDITS: 15 points

Models of work organisation, reform and performance, including industrial and post-industrial forms of work. Employee responses to work and the employment relationship. Workforce diversity.

COURSE: ECON 151
CREDITS: 15 points

Economics affects our daily lives and the global environment in many ways. Through the media we are constantly made aware of price increases, interest rate changes, exchange rate movements and balance of payments problems, growth and recessions, standard of living comparisons, regional trading agreements. What does it all mean and how does it all work?

COURSE: BUSINESS 151G
CREDITS: 15 points

Communication knowledge and skills are essential in business careers and for interpersonal and intercultural relationships. This course offers a theory-based approach combined with applied communication practices. Communication knowledge, competencies and skills are developed through exploring relationships, mediated communication, writing, team dynamics, oral presentation and technologies.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MEDIA 201
CREDITS: 15 points

Focuses on the evolution of media industries and the growth of new media in contemporary China. Investigates a range of media formats in relation to media policies and media production, circulation and consumption. Addresses these issues against the backdrop of the broader aesthetic and socio-cultural influences in contemporary China.

COURSE: MEDIA 301
CREDITS: 15 points

Focuses on the evolution of media industries and the growth of new media in contemporary China. Investigates a range of media formats in relation to media policies and media production, circulation and consumption. Addresses these issues against the backdrop of the broader aesthetic and socio-cultural influences in contemporary China.

COURSE: EDUC 113
CREDITS: 15 points

Educational issues are pressing concerns in our society. The course will help develop understanding of the background of today’s public debates around schooling and will introduce ways in which educational thought and research address big topics.

COURSE: EDPROFST 392
CREDITS: 15 points

An inquiry into key aspects of effective practice in primary and middle school contexts that support the transition to becoming a successful beginning teacher. Focuses on knowledge of self, children, schools, communities of practice, and the interactions and relationships between these, to support effective professional practice.

COURSE: EDCURRIC 368
CREDITS: 15 points

Development of the knowledge base for the teacher of Music, linking curriculum design and principles with practical experience of The Arts in the New Zealand Curriculum document, while offering opportunities for reflection on practice.

COURSE: EDUC 380
CREDITS: 15 points

A grounding in some of the main research and evaluation methods, both quantitative and qualitative, that are useful for educational and social science researchers, and in some of the arguments about their power and legitimacy.

COURSE: EDUC 283
CREDITS: 15 points

Examines personal experiences and views of teaching and learning and the impact of theories of learning on classroom practices. The course also includes discussion of the relationship between pedagogy and race, class and gender; Māori pedagogy; pedagogy and student achievement; and New Zealand and international examples.

COURSE: EDCURRIC 204
CREDITS: 15 points

Develops the knowledge, skills and understanding for designing quality learning experiences for diverse learners. Considers questions related to primary school mathematics and statistics education such as: What are the concepts and learning progressions in the national curriculum? What theoretical models of teaching, learning and assessment best inform teachers about the growth of understanding? What constitutes effective teaching practice?

COURSE: EDCURRIC 350
CREDITS: 15 points

An examination of investigative approaches to the teaching and learning of mathematics within the context of problem solving.

COURSE: EDCURRIC 361
CREDITS: 15 points

A critical examination of the performance of creating in the arts. The processes of creating and shaping works selected from dance, drama, music and the visual arts will be analysed and used to plan and implement arts education practices in specified educational settings.

COURSE: EDUC 300
CREDITS: 15 points

Investigates children’s cultural and social worlds in local and global contexts. ‘The course gives a voice to children’s views and understandings of their childhoods. Topics include: What is ‘childhood’? What roles do place and space have in children’s lives? How do children’s rights invite children to participate in their own lives?

COURSE: EXERSCI 105
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to the risks and benefits of exercise, exercise policy and safety, physical fitness testing, guidelines for exercise test administration, principles of exercise prescription, cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular training.

COURSE: EXERSCI 100G
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to the principles of physical exercise, with a focus on understanding how the body moves and responds to exercise, how performance can be measured, and how fitness can be developed and maintained to optimise health. Particular emphasis will be placed on the debunking of common myths about exercise, and offering evidence-based advice on the benefits of appropriate physical activity.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: EDUC 104G
CREDITS: 15 points

Critically examines the socio-cultural, political and economic significance of sport within Aotearoa New Zealand. Examines how sport is embedded in the lives of people, constitutes identities, and is connected to major spheres of social life and various social issues. Through focusing on select sporting issues it analyses how New Zealanders negotiate understandings of self, ethnicity, gender, sexualities, health, and lifestyle.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ACADENG 101
CREDITS: 15 points

Teaches students the skills necessary to write essays of exposition and argument for university purposes. It includes brainstorming, writing an outline, structuring an essay, integrating quotations, summaries and referencing.

NOTE: This course is available only to students who speak English as an additional language.

COURSE: SPANISH 104
CREDITS: 15 points

Provides a solid grounding in the basic grammar and vocabulary of Spanish for beginners or near beginners, emphasising communicative competence in the present tense. Develops speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, and prepares students at the A1 Level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

Restriction: May not be taken if a more advanced language acquisition course in this subject has previously been passed

COURSE: CHINESE 100
CREDITS: 15 points

Introduces students to modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin, Putonghua) through exercises and activities to develop speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Also introduces the social and cultural background of the language.

Restriction: May not be taken if a more advanced language acquisition course in this subject has previously been passed

COURSE: PHIL 105
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to reasoning, argument, and explanation that emphasises the development of practical skills and their use in everyday life. The course introduces different forms of reasoning and explains techniques to evaluate them. It will enable students to distinguish good arguments and explanations from bad ones, to explain the difference, and thereby to improve critical thinking abilities.

COURSE: ENGWRIT 101
CREDITS: 15 points

A skills-based analysis of texts written for academic purposes. Topics include: essays of comparison and contrast, argumentative essays, problem solution texts, literature reviews, critiques, and report writing.

COURSE: HUMS 101
CREDITS: 15 points

A thematic and chronological survey of major developments in European history and visual culture since the early Middle Ages. The course is designed to provide a solid foundation for subsequent study in European history, art history and culture as well as an introduction to the nature of scholarly research and writing in the Humanities.

COURSE: ACADENG 100
CREDITS: 15 points

Focuses on developing an understanding of academic reading and writing, including sentence and paragraph structure and academic vocabulary, and aims to develop strategies for employing these for effective reading and writing of academic texts. Develops an understanding of broad principles and practices of academic discourse at university level.

NOTE: This course is available only to students who speak English as an additional language. All students must do a writing and/or grammar test at the beginning of this course. Any student whose results show a higher level of English language proficiency than appropriate for this course will not be permitted to take this course.

COURSE: COOKIS 101
CREDITS: 15 points

Gives students an introduction to the structure of Cook Islands Māori as well as allowing them to develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Designed for students with little or no knowledge of the language, and for those with some fluency wishing to understand simple sentence structure and composition.

Restriction: May not be taken if a more advanced language acquisition course in this subject has previously been passed

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MAORI 103
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to spoken Māori for those with no previous knowledge of the language. Concentrates on the acquisition of aural and oral skills, developing the ability to understand and speak Māori.

Restriction: May not be taken if a more advanced language acquisition course in this subject has previously been passed

COURSE: HISTORY 270
CREDITS: 15 points

Examines the history of Ireland from 1798 to the present. It investigates major developments in the social, cultural, political and economic history of the island from the United Irish Rising at the end of the eighteenth century to the early twenty-first century, including the creation of the state of Northern Ireland and ongoing attempts to secure a lasting peace there.

COURSE: HISTORY 370
CREDITS: 15 points

Examines the history of Ireland from 1798 to the present. It investigates major developments in the social, cultural, political and economic history of the island from the United Irish Rising at the end of the eighteenth century to the early twenty-first century, including the creation of the state of Northern Ireland and ongoing attempts to secure a lasting peace there.

COURSE: JAPANESE 130
CREDITS: 15 points

An integrated basic course in modern Japanese covering reading, writing, speaking and listening.

Restriction: May not be taken if a more advanced language acquisition course in this subject has previously been passed

COURSE: KOREAN 110
CREDITS: 15 points

Basic written and spoken skills in modern Korean. Through the practice of listening to and reading basic Korean sentences, fundamental grammar and vocabulary are taught so that students will be able to carry out basic conversation and comprehend simple Korean texts.

Restriction: May not be taken if a more advanced language acquisition course in this subject has previously been passed

COURSE: PACIFIC 212
CREDITS: 15 points

Studies Pacific genres of oral literature in English translation. Genres include oratory, poetry, tales of creation, folk tales, and proverbs and sayings.

COURSE: PACIFIC 312
CREDITS: 15 points

Studies Pacific genres of oral literature in English translation. Genres include oratory, poetry, tales of creation, folk tales, and proverbs and sayings.

COURSE: PHIL 212
CREDITS: 15 points

Considers a range of issues debated by contemporary philosophers concerning the origins, function, definition, ontology, presentation, interpretation, appreciation, expressiveness, representational character, and value of art. Related and applied topics, such as the status of colourised movies, the status of artistic fakes, and the paradox of our enjoying tragedies are also discussed.

COURSE: PHIL 332
CREDITS: 15 points

Considers a range of issues debated by contemporary philosophers concerning the origins, function, definition, ontology, presentation, interpretation, appreciation, expressiveness, representational character, and value of art. Related and applied topics, such as the status of colourised movies, the status of artistic fakes, and the paradox of our enjoying tragedies are also discussed.

COURSE: ENGLISH 121
CREDITS: 15 points

Develops University-wide skills of reading, writing and analysis. Addresses the needs of students in both English and other disciplines where both writing and reading have an important role in learning. The course fosters personal writing skills and also introduces writing as a subject of study in itself.

COURSE: ENGLISH 265
CREDITS: 15 points

A study of selected comedies and tragicomedies of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Works of Shakespeare may include the romantic comedies of his first decade and a half as a playwright, the so-called ‘problem plays’, the darker comedies of his middle years, and the tragicomedies of his final years, sometimes called ‘romances’. The nature of comedy and its relationship to tragedy is also explored.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage I in English or Drama, or approval of Academic Head or nominee Restriction: ENGLISH 310

COURSE: ENGLISH 310
CREDITS: 15 points

A study of selected comedies and tragicomedies of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Works of Shakespeare may include the romantic comedies of his first decade and a half as a playwright, the so-called ‘problem plays’, the darker comedies of his middle years, and the tragicomedies of his final years, sometimes called ‘romances’. The nature of comedy and its relationship to tragedy is also explored.

Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in English or Drama Restriction: ENGLISH 265

COURSE: ACADENG 210
CREDITS: 15 points

Aims to develop skills needed for writing research and laboratory reports. It covers key stages in writing a standard report and the language patterns associated with each of these stages. Course components include writing the literature review, methodology, results and discussion sections of a report, dissertation or thesis.

NOTE: This course is available only to students who speak English as an additional language.

COURSE: POLITICS 218
CREDITS: 15 points

An overview of structures and processes in American politics and policy. Topics include American political development, elements of civil society, the machinery of government, and contemporary politics and policy.

COURSE: EUROPEAN 206
CREDITS: 15 points

This cross-disciplinary course examines political, economic, social and cultural integration and its effects in the fabric of contemporary Europe. Issues addressed include identity, immigration and citizenship in Europe, and matters pertaining to the European Union: its political form, enlargement, foreign and security policy, economic and monetary policy, and the European constitution.

COURSE: EUROPEAN 302
CREDITS: 15 points

This cross-disciplinary course examines political, economic, social and cultural integration and its effects in the fabric of contemporary Europe. Issues addressed include identity, immigration and citizenship in Europe, and matters pertaining to the European Union: its political form, enlargement, foreign and security policy, economic and monetary policy, and the European constitution.

COURSE: LAWPUBL 445
CREDITS: 15 points

The law related to the European Union and its institutional, economic and social structure as well as the general economic and political implications of the present status of the European Union.

COURSE: MAORI 233
CREDITS: 15 points

Examines tikanga (ancestral ways of living) and how these have changed since the arrival of Māori in Aotearoa. Beginning with topics of contemporary interest such as land use, the sea, kinship, gender relations, justice, health and economics, this course will trace the patterns of ancestral life, explore historical debates and reflect upon possible futures.

COURSE: MAORI 396
CREDITS: 15 points

Examines tikanga (ancestral ways of living) and how these have changed since the first arrival of the ancestors of Māori in Aotearoa. Beginning with topics of contemporary interest such as land use, the sea, kinship, gender relations, justice, health and economics, this course will trace the patterns of ancestral life, explore historical debates and reflect upon possible futures.

COURSE: EDUC 104G
CREDITS: 15 points

Critically examines the socio-cultural, political and economic significance of sport within Aotearoa New Zealand. Examines how sport is embedded in the lives of people, constitutes identities, and is connected to major spheres of social life and various social issues. Through focusing on select sporting issues it analyses how New Zealanders negotiate understandings of self, ethnicity, gender, sexualities, health, and lifestyle.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MAORI 130
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to Māori analyses of topics that are often discussed and sometimes controversial, and that continue to shape contemporary life in New Zealand. Topics include aspects of world view, philosophy and social organisation; the Declaration of Independence, the Treaty of Waitangi and European immigration; and contemporary issues including Treaty claims, ownership of the foreshore and seabed and constitutional issues.

COURSE: ASIAN 209
CREDITS: 15 points

Critically engages the current debates surrounding the concept and movement of “transnational Asia” and the possibility of reconciliation among China, Japan and the two Koreas. Examines the historical, cultural and ideological sources and recent development of this new form of regionalism, in addition to such challenges as Chinese hegemony and competing nationalism in the region.

Prerequisite: ASIAN 100 or KOREAN 120 and 45 points at Stage I in BA Restriction: ASIAN 309, 753

COURSE: ASIAN 309
CREDITS: 15 points

Aims to critically engage the current debates surrounding the concept and movement of “transnational Asia” and the possibility of reconciliation among China, Japan and the two Koreas. Examines the historical, cultural, and ideological sources and recent development of this new form of regionalism, as well as such challenges as Chinese hegemony and competing nationalism in the region.

Prerequisite: ASIAN 100 or KOREAN 120 and 30 points at Stage II in BA Restriction: ASIAN 209, 753

COURSE: SOCIOL 101
CREDITS: 15 points

Provides an introduction to the sociological analysis of New Zealand society. Looks at familiar events, institutions, social processes from a sociological point of view and offers ways to understand them in new and different ways. Focuses on the structure of New Zealand society and on social and political changes which affect the lives of New Zealanders and shape their society.

COURSE: EDUC 300
CREDITS: 15 points

Investigates children’s cultural and social worlds in local and global contexts. ‘The course gives a voice to children’s views and understandings of their childhoods. Topics include: What is ‘childhood’? What roles do place and space have in children’s lives? How do children’s rights invite children to participate in their own lives?

COURSE: COMPSCI 111
CREDITS: 15 points

A practical introduction to computing. Topics include: web design, an overview of computer hardware and operating systems, effective use of common applications, using the internet as a communication medium, applying programming concepts, and social implications of technology.

COURSE: STATS 326
CREDITS: 15 points

Components, decompositions, smoothing and filtering, modelling and forecasting. Examples and techniques from a variety of application areas.

COURSE: PHYSICS 102
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to the basic principles of physics. Key topics are the physical description of motion, electricity and magnetism. The course focuses on the science of everyday phenomena and the understanding of important physical concepts. This course will equip students with little prior knowledge of physics to succeed in PHYSICS 120 or 160.

COURSE: CHEM 150
CREDITS: 15 points

The fundamentals of chemistry are explored with a view to enhancing understanding of the chemical nature of the world around us and providing a foundation for further study in chemistry. Special attention is paid to familiarisation with the language of chemistry and the chemist’s perspective of the properties of matter and its transformations.

COURSE: STATS 100
CREDITS: 15 points

A first exposure to statistics that builds data handling skills and develops conceptual thinking through active participation in problems using real data, computer simulations and group work. STATS 100 makes full use of appropriate technology and prepares students for further study in Statistics.

COURSE: STATS 201
CREDITS: 15 points

A practical course in the statistical analysis of data. Interpretation and communication of statistical findings. Includes exploratory data analysis, the analysis of linear models including two-way analysis of variance, experimental design and multiple regression, the analysis of contingency table data including logistic regression, the analysis of time series data, and model selection.

COURSE: STATS 208
CREDITS: 15 points

A practical course in the statistical analysis of data. There is a heavy emphasis in this course on the interpretation and communication of statistical findings. Topics such as exploratory data analysis, the analysis of linear models including two-way analysis of variance, experimental design and multiple regression, the analysis of contingency table data including logistic regression, the analysis of time series data, and model selection will be covered.

COURSE: INFOSYS 222
CREDITS: 15 points

Managers and other knowledge workers find that many of their duties revolve around accessing, organising, and presenting organisational and external information. The ability to develop and use computer databases is becoming a critical skill that is required in many disciplines. These skills are developed through an introduction to data modelling, relational theory, database design, and the management of databases.

COURSE: INFOSYS 110
CREDITS: 15 points

Explores how information systems and analytical tools help organisations to innovate, optimise and deliver value. Examines how the development and implementation of systems and technologies coordinate and manage information, people, and processes within data governance and privacy frameworks.

COURSE: GEOG 205
CREDITS: 15 points

A critical exploration of the interconnectedness of environment and society. The course highlights the importance of understanding how different views and attitudes influence people’s interactions with the environment. Key themes include governance, management and development, which are addressed through issues such as conservation, climate change adaptation, disasters and resource use. Classes draw on a variety of case studies from New Zealand and overseas.

COURSE: MATHS 102
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to calculus that builds mathematical skills and develops conceptual thinking.

MATHS 102 works as a refresher course for those who haven’t studied Mathematics for some time, a confidence builder for those lacking Mathematical confidence and a preparation course for further study in Mathematics.

COURSE: MATHS 108
CREDITS: 15 points

A general entry to Mathematics for commerce and the social sciences. MATHS 108 covers selected topics in algebra and calculus and their applications, including: linear functions, linear equations and matrices; functions, equations and inequalities; limits and continuity; differential calculus of one and two variables; integral calculus of one variable.

COURSE: MATHS 208
CREDITS: 15 points

This sequel to MATHS 108 features applications from the theory of multi-variable calculus, linear algebra and differential equations to real-life problems in statistics, economics, finance, computer science, and operations research. Matlab is used to develop analytical and numerical methods of solving problems.

COURSE: LAWENVIR 420
CREDITS: 15 points

Concepts, principles, customs, and treaties of international law as related to the protection of the global environment including: prevention of pollution, protection of the marine environment, ozone layer protection, climate change, biodiversity, the UNCED process and the legal framework for sustainable development.

COURSE: COMPSCI 110
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to the various layers that make up a modern computer system: encoding of data and instructions, hardware, low-level programming, operating systems, applications and communications.

COURSE: COMPSCI 130
CREDITS: 15 points

Fundamental programming techniques and processes, such as conditionals, iteration, recursion, functions, testing and debugging. Efficient ways to organise and manipulate data, including sorting and searching algorithms. Writing software that uses and implements common abstract data types such as lists, stacks, queues, dictionaries and trees.

COURSE: STATS 101
CREDITS: 15 points

Intended for anyone who will ever have to collect or make sense of data, either in their career or private life. Steps involved in conducting a statistical investigation are studied with the main emphasis being on data analysis and the background concepts necessary for successfully analysing data, extrapolating from patterns in data to more generally applicable conclusions and communicating results to others. Other topics include probability; confidence intervals, statistical significance, t-tests, and p-values; nonparametric methods; one-way analysis of variance, simple linear regression, correlation, tables of counts and the chi-square test.

COURSE: GEOG 103
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to contemporary geospatial technologies such as web-mapping, GPS and tracking devices (such as your phone), Remote Sensing and GIS. Covers key concepts and principles behind these tools and their use, along with practical experiences through laboratories. Critical and theoretical perspectives on the tools, their use, and their social impacts will be discussed.

COURSE: CHEM 100
CREDITS: 15 points

The impact of chemistry on the modern world will be explored by focusing on the stories of specific molecules, including penicillin, DDT and nylon. Their discovery, the underlying chemical principles that explain their behaviour, their impact on our lives including social and scientific issues that arise from their use, and their likely impact on the future will be investigated.

COURSE: COMPSCI 101
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to computers and computer programming in a high-level language. The role of computers and computer professionals in society is also introduced. The course is intended for students who may wish to advance in Computer Science or in Information Systems and Operations Management.

COURSE: STATS 301
CREDITS: 15 points

Introduction to the SAS statistical software with emphasis on using SAS as a programming language for purposes of database manipulation, simulation, statistical modelling and other computer-intensive methods.

COURSE: STATS 210
CREDITS: 15 points

Probability, discrete and continuous distributions, likelihood and estimation, hypothesis testing.

COURSE: STATS 108
CREDITS: 15 points

The standard Stage I Statistics course for the Faculty of Business and Economics or for Arts students taking Economics courses. Its syllabus is as for STATS 101, but it places more emphasis on examples from commerce.

Excursions

CISaustralia and the University of Auckland offer a comprehensive program of co-curricular social and cultural activities at no extra cost. These optional extras vary each year and may include:

  • Pōwhiri (Māori welcome)
  • Orientation
  • Tour of Auckland City
  • Quiz night
  • Yoga or Zumba class and other sports
  • Art gallery visit
  • Summer barbecue
  • Day trips to Rangitoto, Devonport and the Waitakere Ranges

There are also a number of cultural activities and places of interest you can choose to visit on your own (at own expense). Some suggestions in Auckland and New Zealand include:

  • Sky Tower Auckland
  • Waitemata Harbour
  • Auckland Harbour Bridge
  • Albert Park
  • One Tree Hill
  • Waiheke Island
  • Viaduct Harbour
  • Auckland Zoo
  • Various museums, art galleries, aquarium, sculpture gardens and beaches
  • Whale watching
  • Hobbiton
  • Lake Taupo
  • Abel Tasman National Park
  • Milford Sound
  • Queenstown

 

Location

Also known as Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland is New Zealand’s most populous city. It is also the largest Polynesian city in the world and the most multi-cultural, with over 180 different ethnic groups. The city is a hub for food, music, arts and culture that spreads over volcanic hills and around twin harbours, offering an exciting mix of natural wonders and urban adventures.

Home of the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, New Zealand is an amazing place of natural beauty and the epicentre of adventure travel. NZ is made up of two large Islands – North and South, plus numerous smaller islands, and has over 15,000 km of beautiful and varied coastline. The country is located 1,500 km east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and approx. 1,000 km south of Fiji.

Maori were the first to arrive in New Zealand, journeying in canoes from Hawaii about 1,000 years ago. A Dutchman named Abel Tasman was the first European to sight the country, but it was the British who made NZ part of their empire.

Over thousands of years, much of the NZ landscape has become submerged. The Marlborough Sounds and Fiordland are examples of high mountain ranges that have ‘sunk’ into the sea creating spectacular sounds and fiords. NZ has some spectacular geothermal areas and relaxing hot springs – Rotorua is the hub, with mud pools, geysers and hot springs in active thermal areas.

The University

The University of Auckland was formally opened in 1883 as Auckland University College, part of the University of New Zealand. Today, it is the largest university in NZ, hosting over 40,000 students on 5 Auckland campuses.

The University of Auckland is the top-ranked university in New Zealand has been ranked No. 1 for two consecutive years in the University Impact Rankings by Times Higher Education (THE). Other notable rankings in recent years include:

  • Ranked in the top 100 for 33 of its subjects (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2020)
  • Rated as a Five Stars Plus institution for excellence overall, as well in: Research, Employability, Teaching, Facilities, Internationalisation, Innovation and Inclusiveness
  • Entrepreneurial University of the Year (2019 Asia-Pacific Triple E Entrepreneurship and Engagement Excellence Awards in Higher Education)
  • Most innovative university in New Zealand (#35 overall in the world)
  • Leading university for Graduate Employability in NZ
  • #13 in the Times Higher Education’s 2020 list of the world’s most international universities

The University holds a strong commitment to sustainability and making a positive social impact. It also believes achieving equity in employment and education is crucial and strives to being safe, inclusive and equitable for all staff and students.

Accommodation

Students on this program will be housed in Waipārūrū Hall, the largest fully-catered residence hall in New Zealand! Located only a short walk to the centre of the City Campus, Waipārūrū Hall is home to 786 residents across two high-rise towers.

Each student will have their own bedroom containing a single bed, desk and chair, wardrobe with shelving, wall-mounted heating and cooling unit, and a mirror and noticeboard. All bedding and linen is provided, including a weekly linen change.

Multiple single occupant bathrooms shared by residents are located throughout each floor. Each bathroom contains a shower, toilet and hand basin.

Meals at Waipārūrū Hall are included in the program fee. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served on weekdays, while brunch and dinner are served on weekends. Food will cover an extensive range of cuisines. Vegetarian, vegan, halal and gluten-free diets can be catered for. A packed lunch can be requested in advance if students are heading out for the day.

Residents can also enjoy generous communal facilities including:

  • Common rooms on each floor with TVs and a kitchenette with a fridge, microwave and kettle.
  • Large kitchen on the first level.
  • Laundry facilities.
  • Two games/social lounges in each tower, equipped with a variety of gaming equipment – pool table, foosball table, PlayStation and classic Nintendo consoles.
  • Two music practice rooms, each equipped with a piano and one with a drum kit.
  • A range of study facilities, including bookable study/meeting pods.
  • Printer/photocopier facilities available – charges apply.

Residents are responsible for cleaning their own bedrooms. Bathrooms and communal areas are serviced regularly.

A Resident Manager and Resident Advisers live on-site, ensuring there is a duty person available 24 hours a day, in addition to 24/7 on-site Reception services.

Waipārūrū Hall is within close walking distance to:

  • University General Library (centre of the City Campus) – 8 minute walk
  • Grafton Campus – 10 minute walk
  • Parnell/Newmarket shopping precinct – 20-30 minute walk
  • Epsom Campus – 25 minutes by bus

Program Fee & Dates

January 2022
Dates and fees listed below are tentative and subject to change.
Application Deadline24 November 2021
Arrival Date05 January 2022
Departure Date16 February 2022
Program Fee A$ 5,999 - 11,499
OS-HELP A$ 7,037

 

Program fees include the following:
  • Tuition fees
  • CISaustralia support services before, during and after the program
  • Academic advising
  • Financial advice
  • Assistance with travel arrangements
  • Pre-departure guide and session
  • Airport pick-up (on specified program arrival date within designated arrival times)
  • University of Auckland and city orientation
  • Accommodation – single bedroom in fully-catered residence hall
  • Meals – breakfast, lunch and dinner on weekdays, brunch and dinner on weekends
  • Access to tutoring and study skill sessions
  • Co-curricular activities such as sports and quizzes to introduce you to University life (optional)
  • CISaustralia 24/7 on-site support – Site Director
  • University of Auckland official transcript
  • CISaustralia Certificate of Participation (available on request)

What is not included:

  • Flights
  • Medical insurance
  • Travel insurance
  • Visa fees
  • Vaccinations (if required)
  • Meals (unless mentioned above)
  • Extra travel/excursions (other than those mentioned above)

Dates are for reference only and are subject to change. Please do not book flights until you have received the confirmed dates in your acceptance paperwork.

CISaustralia reserves the right to alter fees at any time due to currency fluctuations and/or fee changes made by our partner universities.

Adventure Awaits

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