July in Florence, Italy

 

Spend your winter enjoying a European summer while earning credit towards your degree – sound like a good deal? Spend 3 or 6 weeks in the cradle of the Renaissance and see why travelers can never get enough of Florence.

Program Overview

As a student in the Tuscan city of Florence, you will quickly feel like a local as you wander through busy piazzas in search of your favourite pasta trattoria! The Florence University of the Arts (FUA) is where you will spend your July in Florence program.

Here you’ll be able to experiene:

Variety of program session options – You can you spend 3 or 6 weeks in Florence, with a variety of session start dates to align with your winter break.

Genuine Tuscan food – Everywhere you look you will see and smell local, family-owned cafés and restaurants offering the very best of Italian cuisine. Pasta, pizza, tiramisu and local red wine – life won’t get any better!

Courses in your major, plus exciting electives – Study within your major to further your degree in Australia or attempt a new hobby by taking an elective such as Intro to Photography. Or study Italian in Florence – what better place to learn a new language?

Location, location, location – During your July in Florence program, you will be based in such close proximity to neighbouring European countries. Fancy a quick getaway to Spain or France for some cheese and baguette, or maybe a long weekend swimming in Santorini?

An art lover’s paradise – View famous masterpieces in museums such as the Uffizi Gallery, then purchase your own treasure from a local street artist. You can also choose to take art classes such as photography and painting.

History brought to life – If you’ve heard of the Medici family, you will know that Florence is the best city in the world to discover their history. Spend the morning listening to a class lecture on the powerful Medici family, then walk just minutes from campus to see where the family lived during the Renaissance.

Escape the Aussie Winter – Enjoy a European summer in place of ugg boots, jumpers and frosty mornings.

Highlights

If you’ve ever wanted to study abroad in Italy and perhaps have limited time, then July in Florence is for you!

Here are a few of the key highlights that make this program unique:

  • The July program is flexible and allows you the option of staying in Florence for 3 or 6 weeks while earning credit for 1 or 2 courses
  • Study Italian in Florence – Courses are taught in English, or in full Italian for more advanced speakers
  • Excursions may include Pisa, Lucca and Sienna
  • Smaller class sizes of 8 to 25 students mean you will receive personalised teaching and close attention from the academic team
  • Numerous options for experiencing the city’s music, art, dance, food and more
  • Cook for yourself in your apartment or enjoy food from the local market and many restaurants
  • Vibrant campus life with fully equipped gym, library and internet access
  • Everything you could ever need or want is within walking distance of the Florence city centre
  • Enjoy a social calendar full of exciting cultural activities – some activities you may choose to do include aperitivo in the piazza, exploring Florence’s local boutique and markets, wine tasting at nearby wineries, art galleries, music events… the list is endless!
  • World-class location – it’s a tourist’s dream destination and you will be living the authentic Italian lifestyle
  • Organised accommodation with fellow international students – immediate friends!

Choose Your Course

July in Florence is offered at Florence University of the Arts (FUA). There is a wide selection and variety of courses on offer each session.

Course Load: 1-2 courses per session. You may combine any of the sessions to study in Florence for up to 12 weeks! Please contact us for more details on this option.

  • Depending on your Australian university, “courses” may be referred to as “subjects” or “units”.
  • Each course/subject/unit you undertake on a CISaustralia program is designed to be a full-time, semester course that has been condensed to fit into an intensive, short-term program. As such, for any 1 course you study abroad, you should receive the credit points for 1 full-time course/subject/unit at your Australian university.
  • Many universities work off of a 1-for-1 equivalency (1 course abroad = 1 course in Australia), but ultimately credit approval is the decision of your faculty and Australian university.
  • CISaustralia strongly recommends that you have any overseas courses pre-approved for academic credit before you depart for your program. Some documentation that may be useful are the course outline/syllabus, program overview and the contact hours.
  • Before you head overseas we encourage all students to have a minimum of 3-4 courses approved by your home university in Australia (even if you are only planning a 3-week program). This will allow some flexibility in your class schedule and avoid timetable clashes. A CISaustralia program is a great opportunity to take some interesting electives if your degree allows!
  • Your CISaustralia Program Advisor can assist with any questions or details your university needs to make a decision.

How to Choose Your Courses: This is the fun part. As part of the application process you will complete a CISaustralia Course Selection Worksheet. The following instructions will guide you through the steps in choosing your courses.

Academic Requirement: To qualify for this program, students must be in good academic standing with a GPA of 4.5 (out of 7) or equivalent. If your current GPA falls below the requirement, you may still be considered for the program but will need to be prepared to provide supporting documentation. Please contact us to discuss your situation and we will work with you to help find another suitable program if required.

How to Read the FUA Course Catalog: 

  • Courses numbered 100–299 are for lower-division courses (usually your first and second year at Uni)
  • 300–399 are for upper-division courses (your third and last year at Uni)
  • 400–499 are for introductory courses to graduate studies (your third and fourth year – possible honours courses)

There are a few variables like the length of your degree and major. As for the letters, in ‘LA HS MI 280,’ for example, the first pair represents the college within the University (LA=Liberal Arts); the second, the department within the college (HS=History); and the third, the course within the department (MI=Modern Italy).

If you are finding it difficult to understand the course listings, please feel free to contact us!

Please note that each course indicates during which session it is offered – not every class is offered every session.

2019 Course Descriptions:

COURSE: IDRHAA355 / LAAHAA355
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, A

This course explores the principal architects and artists, monuments, and themes from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italian art and architecture. Class time is divided equally between lectures and on-site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be placed on Renaissance architecture in Florence and will also include architectural developments in other Italian towns. Special topics will include architectural theory, the Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. Coursework will focus on important figures such as Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Michelangelo, and Leonardo, in addition to visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CPCRCM360 / HPHTCM360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and La Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been produced and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropolises and developing destinations will be examined.

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COURSE: FACECE200
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session B

In this course, students will work on pottery and/or ceramic sculpture projects. During the first portion of the course, emphasis will be on different clay hand-building techniques. The second portion, students will progress to a variety of surface decoration techniques and different methods of firing and colouring. Lecture content will provide students essential information about the nature of clay and glazes and the history of Mediterranean ceramics. Students will be introduced to local Tuscan artisan traditions and the work of contemporary ceramic artists during field learning activities.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DIVCGI210
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Pre-requisite: Knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator highly recommended.

The course explores illustration as an instrument of communication (i.e. advertising) and narration (i.e. comic books). It aims at improving drawing and design skills by teaching image making with an emphasis on edge, shape, colour and value. Students will learn how to apply composition and design, colour, and conceptualisation to a wide range of materials and techniques. Students will use illustration software to enhance traditional work and acquire important knowledge in the digital domain. Idea development within real-world parameters, originality, aesthetics, and technical proficiency are emphasised. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTFMFB330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course addresses the new professional shopper profile by examining both the customer-oriented features of the industry as well as the general business principles of the fashion industry. Topics analyse the profession of the personal shopper, understanding the nature of services provided, as well as the strategies advised to clients from wardrobe analysis and purchasing. During the course, students will discuss fashion both in relationship to fashion history and international trends as well as communication and protocol for special occasions such as events. The final part of the class will include career guidance and marketing and promotion principles to build a customer base.

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COURSE: FTFDFD230
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course is an introduction to creative design development and fashion design skills. Topics include design processes, trend research, storyboard creation, colour, fabric selection, draping design concepts, design innovation, and the 2D to 3D development of creative ideas. Students will gain practice in these areas through projects and will also be introduced to the basics of fashion illustration. Students prepare for future apparel design projects by researching the design development process, textiles, materials, and industry practices. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTFCSF360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: A, B

This course addresses the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through lab practice gained by running a real enterprise in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Coursework includes site visits to well-known Italian luxury brands in Florence such as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.

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COURSE: FTFCFM300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the context in which the Italian fashion system was born. Topics begin from the evolution of fashion from the post-WWII period to the present and address the role and influence of media and culture on factors such as economic and social status, the arts, and other issues that influenced fashion. Students explore fashion’s connection to identity, body, politics, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and how fashion and media are interrelated with these aspects of culture.

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COURSE: FAPDFS225
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, 4, B

This course is designed to take full advantage of the student’s unique experiences living and studying in the city of Florence. With on-site inspiration channelled into artistic creativity, students will draw on location at sites of historical significance and visual interest, ranging from architectural masterpieces, landscape vistas, and medieval streets to formal gardens, street markets, and Renaissance fountains. Slide lectures will document the rich history of how Florence and its environs have attracted and inspired visiting artists over the centuries. Students will develop individual sketchbooks with the aim of building up source material for future projects.

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COURSE: GSUSFW280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course examines the city of Florence with themed walks offering a comprehensive approach to the city as an open-air cultural, historical, and artistic research site from its Roman foundation to its contemporary Zeitgeist. Students will learn the history of the city through its art: they will understand how buildings, streets, squares, and monuments can be mapped as living traces of multiple, overlapping layers of a complex past, and how to encode them in their personal appropriation of the city. Starting from learning how to decode the artistic environment of the city and to unveil its traces – both visible and invisible – the course aims at understanding the main social and cultural reasons underlying the existing shape of the city. The course explores traces and evidences from Roman times through Middle Ages, Renaissance, Mannerism and Baroque, up to Art Nouveau and contemporary Florence. Students will be provided with a consistent theoretical background related to relevant historic-artistic landmarks and their social and cultural context and main characters (Guelphs vs. Ghibellines, the Florentine Guilds, Dante, the Medici family, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Ghirlandaio, Ammannati, Pontormo, etc.). Students will be encouraged to develop their own experiential tools and strategies to approach the city through guided field learning activities that assess research, on-site involvement, and academic outcome for each themed walk in Florence.

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COURSE: FTADSH349
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course introduces students to the design and construction of straw accessories such as hats and bags. 3D design principles and hat-making techniques are studied and applied to wearable and non-wearable creations. Students learn basic skills of millinery construction through the methods of patterned and blocked forms, how to manipulate straw and, how to acquire an in-depth understanding of the material.

This course features an Experiential Learning Project at FLY and assisted lab hours. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FAAEGE345
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course introduces students to all aspects related to the operations and management of an art gallery and its exhibited content. Students will be involved in curating and promoting art shows and art-related events through community and on-campus exhibitions.

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COURSE: FTADAD250
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course is an introduction to accessory design. Students will be exposed to a variety of design materials. Emphasis will be placed on 3-dimensional sketching and on creative detail design for footwear, handbags (including embellished evening bags), small leather goods, gloves, and belts. The course includes a historical overview of personal accessories from ancient Egypt to the present. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DIPHID180
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: A, B

This course introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. The course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. Assignments, lectures, readings progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of camera functions (manual mode) and processing techniques. The second half of the course will focus on weaving the techniques with specific photographic concepts via assignments. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasise basic camera functions in manual mode. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Must have a manual setting: ability to set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUMKFM280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course is an introduction to marketing and merchandising concepts in the fashion industry. Emphasis is placed on the apparel and accessory industry in Italy. Students learn terminologies specific to the field. Topics include the meaning of the “brand” in today’s consumer market, how to forecast trends, the product supply chain, the vertical business model and outsourcing, visual merchandising, advertising, different forms of in store and non-store retail, consumer behaviour and profiles, and store location and design. On-site visits to fashion retailers in Florence are an integral part of this course with suggested field trips to local designers as well as to fashion museums such as the Gucci Museum. Other topics include: Product development cycle of the fashion industry: the initial forecast, consumer analysis, marketing plans, sourcing and presenting the product. The importance of retail marketing and “experience shopping” – visual merchandising through analysis of store layout. The course will also cover market research and target customer identification, visual merchandising, direct marketing, internet and social media, and traditional advertising, and will focus on how to generate media attention through public relations (press relations, press kit releases, sponsorships, events, etc.).

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DIPHFP210
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

The course is based on a series of theoretical lectures on the technical, cultural, visual, and historic aspects of fashion photography. Fashion photography history will be analysed from the beginning of the 20th century through contemporary works, following the continuously changing fashion styles and trends of today. This introductory course will concentrate on the technical and logistical aspects of fashion photography using natural light and light basic metering. This course combines introduction to photographic techniques with an emphasis on fashion photography. The first six lessons students will be guided through basic (introductory) camera usage. The later part of this course students will be challenged on basic fashion photography assignments. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Must have a manual setting: ability to set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DIPHFP140
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course involves theoretical and practical aspects related to film photography. In addition to lectures, coursework will take place both outdoors in the city of Florence and in the darkroom. Students will learn how to use the camera correctly, how to expose film, and the basic principles of black and white photography and composition. In addition, students will be given a broad overview of the history of photography. Students will work on two projects and a final portfolio. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: FAPDWC180
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This foundation course will explore methods, techniques and various aspects of watercolour painting. The unique qualities of watercolour will be explored through direct observation exercises, demonstrations and individual projects. Watercolour techniques will be explored, including developing drawings to form strong compositions, capturing the effects of light, colour-mixing and washes. Students will develop their painting skills, techniques, and aesthetic sensibilities to artistic expression in watercolour medium. The class format consists of studio work with lectures, examples, demonstrations, and individual as well as group critiques. Reading and homework assignments are coordinated with the studio work.

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COURSE: IDRHAR340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course explores the principal architects, monuments and themes of fifteenth and sixteenth century Italian architecture. The course includes site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be on Renaissance architecture in Florence, but will also include architectural developments in Rome, Urbino, Mantua, Verona and Vicenza. Special topics will include: architectural theory, Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. A special focus will be dedicated to architects: Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Giuliano Sangallo, Bramante, Antonio Sangallo the Younger, Michelangelo, Giulio Romano and Palladio. Visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence are included.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTFDKW270
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course familiarises students with the world of knitwear and a general knowledge of knitwear styles. Students will be introduced to prominent examples of fashion designers who create knitwear and to the technical instruments, tools, and methods of creating knitwear products. Emphasis is placed on learning the standard knitting techniques, draping and pattern-making practices in the knitwear industry and on the industrial methods to develop knit designs. Course topics also cover various design aspects, yarn categories, colour, fabric structure, and fashion trends in knitwear.

This course features an Experiential Learning Project at FLY. Garments produced will permanently remain at FLY for placement in window displays, photoshoots and other special installations throughout the seasons.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DIPHLA300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

The city of Florence, with its backdrop of Medieval and Renaissance buildings coupled with the varied beauty of the Tuscan countryside, will offer students a stimulating range of opportunities for landscape and architectural photography. The course will be divided between outdoor field practice and the exploration of several camera format techniques, lenses as well as printing. By studying influential photographers compositional and artistic issues of parallax, distortion and perspective will be addressed and executed through assignments. A personal vision will be nurtured and guided by the instructor for the final project in a series of landscape/naturalistic/architectural visual context. The print lab will provide students with the tools for elaborating and printing their own images. This course is also recommended for Communications, Architecture, and Environmental Studies majors. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. This is a specialized course which requires at least one specialized lens. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Please contact FUA if you have doubts regarding your camera/lens(es).

This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LAPAVT240
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session A

This course is based on the study and practice of the necessary voice techniques to master opera repertoire under the professional guidance of the instructor. Through a series of individual lessons, students will be instructed on the development of healthy and correct breathing habits and on the proper use of the muscles to obtain accurate sound emissions in order to support the sound through the body. The course will also address the key techniques necessary to achieve correct tone placement and sound resonance. Students will train to gain control of the physiological aspects of phonation, acquiring competence in singing in Italian and the ability to address the challenges of the singer’s career. The course will provide the opportunity for the students to merge with the local musical community through research assignments.

This course requires a placement audition and includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: FAPDPA225
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

In this foundational open-air painting course, students will explore and familiarize with the pleasures and challenges of painting outdoors. The students will acquire skills in the techniques of Plein Air painting with oil pastels and develop critical skills to evaluate paintings executed in this style. This course will also provide students with an in-depth look at the various materials and products for outdoor painting using wet techniques. Students will be introduced to the history and tradition of this genre; the “conceptual” in landscape painting will be emphasized with a specific focus on the Italian impressionists also known as the Macchiaioli. Sessions will be held in studio and at different outdoor venues in and around Florence.

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COURSE: DIPHPJ320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended.

During this two-pronged course, students will focus on: 1) the history and study of photojournalism from its genesis/inception to today and 2) assignments/projects that are journalistic newsworthy (events, human interest, artistic/cultural, sports, feature, and portrait). Students will emulate what it is like to be a newspaper photographer and learn storytelling images of the everyday events that occur in life. Through lectures and discussions students will also address contemporary issues such as: the cultural, social, and political influence of images and photojournalism in society as well as ethics and legal issues in photojournalism. The print lab will provide students with the tools for elaborating and printing their own images. This course is recommended for Communications, Journalism, and Social Sciences students. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LAPAPB120
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session A

The course is a basic introduction to playing the piano. Topics will cover basic technical skills and an introduction to the ground elements of solfège and harmony. The students will focus on understanding music symbols and terminology, using appropriate techniques for piano performance, and developing ear training. Students will also be exposed to a variety of musical literature and to the music environment belonging to the history of Florence, which will enhance their learning experience through hands-on research and through participation in concerts and venues offered by the local theatres and opera house. The course is designed for those students with little or no piano experience.

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COURSE: LAPAPA200
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session A

This course is a development of the knowledge and techniques acquired in Beginner Piano. Topics will address a more complex and challenging piano repertoire and encourage the students to develop the skills necessary to increase their technical awareness of piano music. The course will also take into account the analysis and understanding of a selected number of theoretical musical elements to better appreciate the depth of the musical language studied. Starting from the intermediate level onwards, the selection on studies and technical pieces will be geared towards the individual level and needs of the participant in order to address the specific challenges met by the students. Students will increase their musical aesthetic and their awareness of the relevance of music in society thanks to hands-on research at Florence’s musical resources and institutions.

This course requires a placement audition.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LAPAPV300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session A

This is an individualised course aimed at offering to each student professional guidance in achieving the personal objectives as a singer and performer. The program of the course will differ according to each student, granting a tailored approach in order to analyse specific breathing techniques and the necessary vocal exercises needed to improve pitch and sound quality. Focus will be given also to the interpretation and correct styling of the repertoire varying from classical opera to modern songs. Student involvement in the Florentine musical landscape will be cultivated throughout the course.

This course requires a placement audition.

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COURSE: FTFDSC315
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This hands-on course will develop the fundamental skills and techniques of sewing and garment construction. Course topics feature the mechanized and manually-processed techniques involved in the creation of simple cotton garments. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: FTADSR210
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The fundamental aspects of accessory design allow students to learn drawing and rendering techniques, which illustrate materials and textures for handbags, belts, gloves, shoes, and hats. Starting from sketches and basic technical drawing techniques, students develop skills that enable them to apply diverse drawing methodologies.

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COURSE: DIPHSP220
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course considers how street photographers strive to capture the life and culture of city streets, searching for what Henri Cartier-Bresson termed the “Decisive Moment.” When it comes to street photography, a skilled street photographer is able to anticipate action, interaction and that microsecond when the ordinary street scene becomes an extraordinary photograph. Methods that encourages interaction between the photographer and subject are stressed. Techniques mastered by Cartier-Bresson, Garry Winogrand, Costas, as well as others will be examined. Students will immerse themselves in the whirl of street life in Florence as they move towards an understanding of what it takes to successfully photograph in the street. NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode. A DSLR camera and a lens with a focal length of 55mm or wider is required for this course. Must have a manual setting: ability to set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTFCSC280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Through a series of walks and visits through art and design this course intends to show famous and hidden fashion paths in Florence. A journey through time and space to discover the place that marked the birth of Italian fashion and opened the doors to Made in Italy. Back in 1954 Florence was the star of the fashion system, anticipating trends and steeling the exclusive scene from Paris. Italy embraced the “new”in fashion through the talent and genius of Giovanni Battista Giorgini, who staged the first ever Italian fashion shows in Florence. Students will discover a city of exquisite taste, tradition and artistic craftsmanship.

Starting from the location of the first Italian cat walk held in the Sala Bianca of Palazzo Pitti, they will learn how to map the fashion environment of the city. From Renaissance to modern day inspiration, fashion is kept alive in the products that were designed here and that grace the beautiful city today. Designers, such as Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Emilio Pucci, Stefano Ricci, Ermanno Scervino, and Roberto Cavalli, have all developed and changed through the years and they have all surely blossomed here in Florence.

The course is intended to provide academic knowledge through guided field learning activities that include research, on-site involvement, and topic assessment for each fashion themed walk in Florence. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students’ academic and personal enrichment.

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COURSE: DIPHTP225
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course introduces students to photography with a particular focus on reportage and travel photography perspectives of this medium, offering a chance to explore the world through a camera viewfinder. Key course topics include learning to express a sense of place, capturing mood/feeling, and shooting a variety of subjects ranging from daily life to landscapes, urban settings, cultural portraits, festivals, and rituals. The course will be divided between outdoor field practice and learning introductory digital techniques. This course is recommended for students majoring in Communications, Journalism, and Tourism. Basic photography experience and knowledge will be helpful but not necessary. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasise basic camera functions in manual mode.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DIVCDF190
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Pre-requisite: Basic knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, or similar software, is highly recommended.

This course centres on visual communication design as a human communication problem and focuses on essential aspects of the profession and of the education of designers. The visual communication designer works on the interpretation, organisation, and visual presentation of messages. Sensitivity toward form should go hand in hand with sensitivity toward content. Visual designers concentrate their work on the effectiveness, appropriateness, beauty, and budget of the messages. Through a series of tasks and exercises, the ubiquitous presence of visual communication principles will let the student see the many aspects of shape, colour, space, typography and movement more compellingly as manifestations of one coherent medium. Topics include the study of space, colour, frame, layout theory through the principles of Gestalt Psychology and other fundamentals concepts. The course will focus primarily on the basic computer programs for visual communication from the Adobe Suite. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: FTFCVM325
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the creative field of visual merchandising and its importance to the retail and fashion industries. Students develop skills in the evaluation and implementation of visual merchandising concepts. The key elements covered include merchandising, principles and elements of design, terminology, and evaluation.

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COURSE: DIPHIP250
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

iPhoneography is a photography concept that involves the professional use of the iPhone camera. Various iPhone apps and constant connection to the internet (either via wi-fi or cellular data) can turn an iPhone camera into a powerful, self-sustained, hand-held camera and darkroom ready to release information globally in the constantly changing digital market. Students will learn to use the iPhone camera to produce photojournalism essays, portraits, landscape, and fashion images using different iPhone applications and professional post-processing tools. The final images will be published in a dedicated class website and will be delivered to students as fine art prints for their final portfolio. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. iPhone or iPad with a camera, purchase capacity for up to 7 different applications, (an Apple account with credit card must be activated before course start).

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COURSE: CPCRCM360 / HPHTCM360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and La Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been produced and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropolises and developing destinations will be examined.

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COURSE: FWBPBT320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course introduces students to baking and pastry fundamentals through an analysis of the features and functions of the main pastry ingredients. The course starts with a complete overview of eggs, flour, fats, sugar, and dairy products in order to create a basis on which all future courses will develop. Students will approach the basic mixing and cooking methods in order to understand the baking process with all its possible variations. Special emphasis will be placed on short crust pastry, pate choux, enriched dough, and stirred custards. Upon successful completion of the course, students will gain confidence in the production of sponge cake, pound cake, pastry and English cream, and basic short crust dough. Students will be able to describe and produce the main meringues.

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COURSE: FWBPBI325
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course introduces students to the heritage of Italian traditional breads and provides a survey of the suitable flours and their characteristics as well as an introduction to the chemistry of baking and the most common starters. This course offers the opportunity to learn principles and techniques to prepare Italian breads, flat breads and rolls. Emphasis will be placed on the use of traditional fermentation methods, equipment and skills that emphasise flavour, texture and appearance as well as techniques that increase shelf-life. Fresh brewery yeast, biga, and poolish will be used according to the leavening processes of a variety of products. Students will learn the proper techniques for mixing, leavening, shaping and cooking Italian breads and other Italian baked and non-baked classics using dedicated flours and ingredients according to the regional heritage.

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COURSE: FTFMRO350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analysed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: LACRCM390
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course presents the specific structural and phenomenological aspects of the various types of mafia operating in Italy and internationally. Topics analyse contemporary criminal, social, cultural, and political features of mafia-related groups and explore traditional and emerging illegal markets. The course describes main Italian and international law policies and legislations to contrast this type of organised crime and the experiences of leading individuals and groups developing a culture of legality to combat the mafia.

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COURSE: FWBPDS480
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Pre-requisite: Baking and Pastry Majors only.

The aim of the course is to give students the fundamentals of dessert presentation. Starting from fruit cutting skills, students will experience a variety of decoration techniques to be applied to mignons, single portion desserts, and tortes. Glazes and gelées, buttercream, whipped cream, icings, and chocolate and caramel decorations will be explained and practiced to gain confidence with related techniques. Students will experience both classic and contemporary decoration methods ranging from piping skills to the application of specific equipment for royal-icing writing. By the end of the course students will be able to execute decorating and styling techniques and to develop their own personal plating style.

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COURSE: BUEREM305
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A

The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyse the marketing development strategies of new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross-disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs.

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COURSE: FTFMFB330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course addresses the new professional shopper profile by examining both the customer-oriented features of the industry as well as the general business principles of the fashion industry. Topics analyse the profession of the personal shopper, understanding the nature of services provided, as well as the strategies advised to clients from wardrobe analysis and purchasing. During the course, students will discuss fashion both in relationship to fashion history and international trends as well as communication and protocol for special occasions such as events. The final part of the class will include career guidance and marketing and promotion principles to build a customer base.

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COURSE: FTFCSF360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: A, B

This course addresses the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through lab practice gained by running a real enterprise in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Coursework includes site visits to well-known Italian luxury brands in Florence such as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.

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COURSE: HPFBOM400
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course introduces a fundamental area of study in the hospitality industry. Students will study the concepts and procedures of food and beverage control systems, cost control, operating budgets, and the effective management of food and beverage operations and cycles. Cost calculation, menu planning, storage, receiving, profit and budget forecasting, labour costs, service payment systems, and other topic-specific areas will be covered. This course features Experiential Learning hours (Mon-Fri) at Ganzo FOH and Beverage Operations.

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COURSE: FWWCWC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyse the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.

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COURSE: FWWCWC345
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyse the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course.

This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centred process.

This course includes an Italian language component for beginning language students + 90 field learning hours.

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COURSE: HPFBSM330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, A

The front of house area of any restaurant should be carefully planned in order to balance ambiance with function. Restaurant seating, wait stations, and waiting areas are just a few of the areas to consider when planning a restaurant dining room. The course focuses on all aspects that characterize the front of the house experience. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the front of the house to properly reflect the restaurant concept and the necessity of planning front of the house spaces for efficiency. Furthermore, the course considers the pivotal role of excellent customer service and the training methods of front of the house staff. This course features Experiential Learning hours.

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COURSE: HPHLHM430
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course examines two critical areas of hospitality management such as management operations and front office procedures. In the first part of the course, students will examine the industry from a managerial perspective by covering the business procedures, accounting controls, legal issues, and policies. Such topics are necessary in order to effectively manage hospitality structures such as hotels, resorts, restaurants, and clubs. The second half of the course focuses on front office procedures from business flow to reservation processes, revenue management, accounting, internal control, night audit, and computer systems for guest management. Housekeeping operations, guest accounts, room management, and other services will also be studied from a service-oriented perspective.

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COURSE: BUMAHR350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis on human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and other current issues. The course has been developed for individuals whose job requires managing employees in a global environment according to HR standards and practices. Topics covered include human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel, legal issues, and how diversity impacts the workforce. Please note that this course is open to students of Junior Standing.

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COURSE: BUMAIM310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management or equivalent.

This course is designed for students interested in international business ventures and partnerships. Management, leadership, human resource management, organisational skills, and strategies will all be analysed from a cross-cultural business perspective. A major focus is on strategies adapting managerial skills across cultures. Guest lecturers and on-site visits to international business ventures are an integral part of the course.

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COURSE: HPHTIN320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the development of international tourism from its historic beginnings to current growth. Emphasis will be placed on the topics of tourism marketing and structures, the role of governments in international tourism, the effect of tourism in a country’s infrastructure and society, and the impact of tourism in developing countries.

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COURSE: HPHTIE200
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This introductory course provides students with the basic knowledge in the operation, coordination, and management of special events, and an overview of the major segments of the event industry. This course is designed for those who wish to explore the event industry for the first time with the purpose of developing their event management capabilities starting from a beginner level. Throughout course duration, students will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of real events held on campus in order to apply information acquired during class to a realistic context. During the course, students will gain first-hand experience by analytic observation through participation in a variety of events organised on campus. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: BUMKFM280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course is an introduction to marketing and merchandising concepts in the fashion industry. Emphasis is placed on the apparel and accessory industry in Italy. Students learn terminologies specific to the field. Topics include the meaning of the “brand” in today’s consumer market, how to forecast trends, the product supply chain, the vertical business model and outsourcing, visual merchandising, advertising, different forms of in store and non-store retail, consumer behaviour and profiles, and store location and design. On-site visits to fashion retailers in Florence are an integral part of this course with suggested field trips to local designers as well as to fashion museums such as the Gucci Museum. Other topics include: Product development cycle of the fashion industry: the initial forecast, consumer analysis, marketing plans, sourcing and presenting the product. The importance of retail marketing and “experience shopping” – visual merchandising through analysis of store layout. The course will also cover market research and target customer identification, visual merchandising, direct marketing, internet and social media, and traditional advertising, and will focus on how to generate media attention through public relations (press relations, press kit releases, sponsorships, events, etc.).

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COURSE: HPHTIH300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course provides a fundamental overview of the hospitality industry and its main sectors: hotel, restaurant, management services, and clubs. In addition, students will learn the features of hospitality operations and trends, and examine the following topics: development of tourism, demand for travel, examination of food and beverages industry, associations and organisations related to hospitality as a sub-segment of the tourism industry. Students will gain a full understanding of the career opportunities that exist within the hospitality industry.

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COURSE: BUMAIM250
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This introductory course provides an overview of management functions and managerial problem-solving strategies. Students will be instructed in the areas such as the qualities of successful managers, elements of strategic decision-making at various levels of an organisation, global business issues, goal-setting processes, and basic business controls. This course also teaches the fundamental principles of management built on human relations in order to manage and lead people effectively, resolve conflicts, and build productive teams.

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COURSE: BUMKIM280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course is designed for non-business majors and introduces students to the role of marketing within a business. Through a combination of lectures, case studies, readings and simulations, students will address analytical marketing concepts and techniques developed from economics, psychology, statistics, and finance in order to plan and develop products and services to satisfy the needs of target customers. Topics include product planning, pricing, promotion, advertising, distribution policies, targeting, and market research techniques.

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COURSE: FWCAPC330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course is the first out of three about Professional Cooking and its aim is to introduce students to culinary fundamentals. The structure of the classical kitchen will be compared to the contemporary one in order to understand the differences in the organization of the brigade. The role of the Chef will be explained and discussed. Tools and equipment use, weights, measures and recipe conversion will be explained and practiced.  This course will provide the first basic information about seasonings and flavourings and the application of herbs and spices in the kitchen. Students will approach cooking thanks to a careful analysis of knife skills, principles of cooking and basic cooking techniques, that include eggs, vegetables, pasta and meat cookery. Special emphasis will be placed on methods and procedures rather than on the complete preparation of finished dishes. A special focus will be put on kitchen cleaning, sanitation, maintenance and personal safety.

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COURSE: FWBPIC440
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Pre-requisite: Baking and Pastry Majors only.

This course introduces students to the use of sugar for the creation of a variety of confectionery items. Students will both learn confectionery skills and experience the production of marmalades and jams, candies and gelées, nougat, and Italian croccante. The course will also focus on the production and storage of candied and caramelized fruit, fruit in syrup, chutneys, and Italian mostarda.

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COURSE: FWCANC505
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts Majors only.

The course offers a survey and classification of macro and micro nutrients for the development and analysis of nutritionally balanced meals. Students will learn the fundamentals of metabolism and digestion to apply nutritional concepts to a wide variety of ingredients utilised in satisfying dishes that respect nutritional values. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of special dietary requirements depending on special dietary needs or ethical choices. Raw foodism, vegetarian and vegan diets, as well as alternatives to guarantee a balanced nutritional intake will be thoroughly covered. The course provides students with the tools to design meals on a seasonal basis following the principles of healthy cooking. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. EL hours include Special EL Project Friday Dinners at Ganzo.

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COURSE: FWWCPF335
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course presents an exploration of food and wine pairing. The topic goes beyond a classic approach to pairing by demystifying the terminology and the methodology of matching wine and food. Whether preparing a meal at home or ordering at a restaurant, students gain an enhanced knowledge of pairing that can create a harmony and synergy between wine and food, which ultimately leads to a sublime connection of the mind, mouth, memories, and experiences. Particular focus will be given to the Italian cultural approach through wine tastings from the major wine areas paired with classic Italian recipes.

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COURSE: LACRRM350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the relationship between gender inequality and the legal system. Topics include abortion, marriage, divorce, custody, equal pay, sexual harassment, rape, pornography, and prostitution. Students are introduced to basic legal research tools, such as statutes, regulations, cases, and legal literature. Bride kidnapping, also known as marriage by abduction or marriage by capture, is a practice known throughout history and around the world through which a man abducts the woman he wishes to marry.

Specific case studies will be covered such as the “fuitina” in Italy, which was a widespread practice in Sicily and the south. In theory and in some cases, it was an agreed elopement between two youngsters, in practice it was often a forcible kidnapping and rape followed by a so-called “rehabilitating marriage” (matrimonio riparatore). In 1965, this custom was brought to national attention by the case of 17-year-old Franca Viola, abducted and raped by a local small-time criminal, with the assistance of a dozen of his friends. When she was returned to her family after a week, she refused to marry her abductor, contrary to local expectations. Her family courageously supported her decision, and suffered severe intimidation for their efforts. Ultimately, the kidnappers were arrested and the main perpetrator was sentenced to 11 years in prison. The exposure of this archaic and intransigent system of values and behavioural mores caused great national debate. A 1970 film, “La moglie più bella” (The Most Beautiful Wife) by Damiano Damiani and starring Ornella Muti, is based on the case. Article 544 of the Italian Penal Code was amended only in 1981, when by law, rape could not be cancelled by marriage.

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COURSE: HPFBRM390
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course examines the problems of the financial structures of restaurant management, in parallel with the objectives and techniques of the individual owner. The planning and decision-making tools available to managers in an organisation and comparison between single or partnership managements will be discussed. Personnel organisation and food preparation plans will be covered. The course is based on a double approach, combining theory and practice: students will be introduced to the basics of restaurant management and will be given the opportunity to discuss their ideas and questions with selected professionals who are successfully running their restaurant businesses in Florence. Extensive site visits to local restaurants be organised. This course features Experiential Learning hours (Mon-Fri) at Ganzo FOH. Some shifts may take place in the evening.

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COURSE: HPHTSE410
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Event Management or equivalent.

This course examines all aspects of special event management and provides a comprehensive study of the special events industry focused on emphasising the dynamics of the creative process critical to these events. Special events include but are not limited to business events, weddings, ceremonies, celebrations, life cycle events, fairs, and festivals. Through the event planning process, special events will be examined from a logistical and financial perspective. The course will also provide students with the necessary background for improving effectiveness and profitability when managing special events, which demands competence in the areas of drafting contracts for events, marketing and sales, event logistics and preparations, staffing, and accounting. Special attention is given to the use of new digital tools for the organisation of events as well as the significant forms of social media in order to more effectively promote events. Coursework is tailored for students who already have studied the basics of event management. This class includes Experiential Learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: BUMAEF280 / SHSSEF280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A

This course provides the opportunity to understand and appreciate the facility operations and event management in the sport industry. Course topics will focus on various aspects of business, legal, and operational practices in the sports field. The class will feature lecture hours as well as real-life practice through the development of both facility management and sports events projects. Students will be engaged within the community and will be able to learn-by-doing, applying business theories and frameworks to the projects development. Coursework will enhance the students’ perspective and awareness of business issues from both a technical and a cultural point of view.

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COURSE: BUERFB310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Family enterprises have always been central to the social and economic fabric of Italy. Some of the world’s oldest family companies are Italian and the city of Florence represents a very important starting point. The course will explore the evolution, characteristics, and significance of Italian family firms and also analyse the changes and trends in Italian family businesses over the centuries, how a 2,000-year-old system is reacting to an age of increasing European unity and integration, mass immigration to Italy, and globalisation and competition with China and India. The first part of the course will provide an overview of the history of family-owned firms from the Roman Empire to the present day and their role in the social, political, and economic life of Italy. The second part will consider case studies in different sectors: wine and food, fashion, the automobile industry and the hospitality sector. Site visits to family enterprises in and around Florence are an integral part of the course.

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COURSE: BUMKMM315
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

The course discusses and analyses major marketing themes and concepts. Students will examine the influences a marketing plan has on Product definition (market of reference and segment analysis), Price, Place (distribution channels), and Promotion. Topics include an introduction to marketing, marketing planning, product concepts and product management, segmentation, targeting and positioning, consumer buying behaviour, promotional activities, channels of distribution, and pricing concepts. The course will also discuss a valid approach to the marketing process, from analysis to planning, implementation, and control of programs designed to generate the desired exchanges with target markets for the purpose of achieving organisational objectives.

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COURSE: FWCATF340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Italian culinary tradition is the result of a long and complex historical, social and cultural process that can be fully understood through a careful analysis of the many aspects of Italian cultural heritage. In the past, food was characterised by the use of locally available ingredients and alimentary habits slowly became established and codified along with the specialisation and the improvement of regionally different production methods. Nevertheless, nutrition and cooking underwent substantial changes and profound transformations through the centuries, often resulting from historical and political events that affected the economy, the production, and the distribution of goods.

This course introduces students to Italian gastronomical traditions through the analysis of the main ingredients and the traditional preparations that have contributed to make Italian cuisine the most popular and imitated. Students will be introduced to the world of Italian quality ingredients thanks to a survey of DOP, IGP, and Slow Food Presidia quality certifications. The fundamental traditional cooking methods, techniques, and preparations utilised in Italian cuisine will be thoroughly covered and sampled in class. Course topics will be analysed through a focus on cultural background, origins, production processes, technical features and application in Italian cuisine. These experiences will prepare students continuing on to the advanced section of this course.

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COURSE: FWWCTW262
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

The course will introduce students to the outstanding richness of the Tuscan wine tradition. Wine typologies representative of the region will be considered throughout the course, which focuses particularly on a detailed study of the most important wine production areas in Tuscany. A general introduction to wine appreciation will be featured along with the analysis of select Tuscan wines and their specific characteristics.

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COURSE: FWWEWA340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course introduces students to Italy’s wine culture, tradition, and heritage as well as to the importance of wine within the Italian socio-economic framework and how to read an Italian wine label. The major grape varieties cultivated in Italy will be analysed and an emphasis will be placed on the main wine production techniques in order to understand the winemaking processes for red, white, rosé, Italian sparkling, sweet, and fortified wines. Students will learn the differences among types and styles of wine according to the winemaking choices, developing a critical capability of analysis and classification.

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COURSE: FWWEWS335
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course will examine the figure of the sommelier and provide essential information regarding wine service and beverage management. Topics include stocking a cellar, storing wine, reading and composing a wine list, selecting proper wine glasses, serving wine, decanting wine, and an introduction to other beverages. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: FWWEWW360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course has been designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the main wine producing countries of the Old World as France, Spain, Germany, Austria, Portugal, Hungary, Greece, Slovenia and of course Italy. Students will be guided across Europe to discover the principal wine areas and native grape varieties, with a specific focus on the cultural heritage and winemaking tradition that belong to each country. Course topics include the different appellation systems, soil characteristics, and basics of winemaking process. The course also offers an introduction to wine tasting in order to better understand the original features of the wines from each country.

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COURSE: FTFCFM300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the context in which the Italian fashion system was born. Topics begin from the evolution of fashion from the post-WWII period to the present and address the role and influence of media and culture on factors such as economic and social status, the arts, and other issues that influenced fashion. Students explore fashion’s connection to identity, body, politics, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and how fashion and media are interrelated with these aspects of culture.

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COURSE: CPMCCP150
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session B

This course introduces students to the strategic roles and functions of the Public Relations (PR) practitioner. Students evaluate the context in which PR is practiced, gain an understanding of the potential and practice of PR as a management function, and critically analyse the structure of PR management, its role, and techniques. In addition, students will be introduced to the rhetorical arguments that impact PR activities and will be made aware of the importance of professionalism and ethics in the practice of public relations.

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COURSE: CPPULM330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The first of a two-part series on magazine production, this course gives students a professional magazine production experience as an academic course. Students, under the supervision of faculty members, will curate every phase of production brainstorming, design, writing, photos, editing, layouts, production, and distribution of a professional lifestyle magazine produced by the institution. The magazine and its semi-annual format will represent the student’s approach to living in Florence and topics such as the arts, gastronomy, travel, style, city scenes, etc. from a cutting edge perspective that seeks to challenge and go beyond the surface of a city. Course projects and activities will interact with the journalism activities of Blending, the magazine of FUA’s campus press Ingorda. This project requires additional hours outside of regularly scheduled class times. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: DIPHPJ320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended.

During this two-pronged course, students will focus on: 1) the history and study of photojournalism from its genesis/inception to today and 2) assignments/projects that are journalistic newsworthy (events, human interest, artistic/cultural, sports, feature, and portrait). Students will emulate what it is like to be a newspaper photographer and learn storytelling images of the everyday events that occur in life. Through lectures and discussions students will also address contemporary issues such as: the cultural, social, and political influence of images and photojournalism in society as well as ethics and legal issues in photojournalism. The print lab will provide students with the tools for elaborating and printing their own images. This course is recommended for Communications, Journalism, and Social Sciences students. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: CPMCSM320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session A

What do we mean by “community”? How do we encourage, discuss, analyse, understand, design, and participate in healthy communities in the age of many-to-many media? With the advent of virtual communities, smart mobs, and online social networks, old questions about the meaning of human social behaviour have taken on renewed significance. Although this course is grounded in theory, it is equally rooted in practice, and much of the class discussion takes place in social cyberspaces. This course requires the active engagement of students and a willingness to experience a full immersion in social media practices. Much of the class discussion takes place in a variety of virtual world environments during and between face-to-face class meetings. Students who participate in this course will actively and productively engage in established and emerging forms of social media – and have some notion of how these practices affect the self and the community.

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COURSE: CPJLTW290
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

The basis of this course is the development of creative writing skills by focusing on the genre of travel writing. Students will read and discuss extracts from the great classics of travel writing as well as current travel journalism published in newspapers, magazines, and online. Assignments will focus on developing an individual voice, and honing ideas through revision and drafting. Topics will cover how to write for different audiences and publishing formats. Course projects and activities will interact with the journalism activities of Blending, the magazine and newsletter of FUA’s campus press Ingorda. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

NOTE: Students participate in one Thursday evening editorial meeting for Blending Newsletter and Magazine. Meeting assignments are communicated on the first of day.

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COURSE: DIVCDF190
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Pre-requisite: Basic knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, or similar software, is highly recommended.

This course centres on visual communication design as a human communication problem and focuses on essential aspects of the profession and of the education of designers. The visual communication designer works on the interpretation, organisation, and visual presentation of messages. Sensitivity toward form should go hand in hand with sensitivity toward content. Visual designers concentrate their work on the effectiveness, appropriateness, beauty, and budget of the messages. Through a series of tasks and exercises, the ubiquitous presence of visual communication principles will let the student see the many aspects of shape, colour, space, typography and movement more compellingly as manifestations of one coherent medium. Topics include the study of space, colour, frame, layout theory through the principles of Gestalt Psychology and other fundamentals concepts. The course will focus primarily on the basic computer programs for visual communication from the Adobe Suite. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: LAPLBE320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course examines the ethics of medical practices and issues in contemporary society. Coursework will pose questions regarding areas that affect human life and death. Topics include practices such as euthanasia, birth control and abortion, cloning, genetic engineering, and biomedical research. Students will analyse the ethical nature of covered practices, how they affect humans on individual and social scales, and the relationship between patients and physicians and medical structures in terms of information, consent, and responsibility. Case studies from local European as well as non-European countries will be closely considered for discussion and study.

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COURSE: FWFCFC340 / LSSOFC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, A, B

This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as “made in Italy” culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism, and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and/or tastings.

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COURSE: FWCACC350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as “social creatures”. Italy represents a unique case for how food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society.

This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Food labs twice a week, one aperitivo project shift per session.

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COURSE: FWCAHW345
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: All

Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach food. Food facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced the worldwide awareness of food as the primary source of a healthy lifestyle. Italy has always stood out for its genuine cuisine characterised by fresh seasonal ingredients, an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle. Particular emphasis will be placed on seasonality, whole foods, and freshness, and contemporary innovations and traditional customs will be analysed for the production of dishes and snacks that are both tasty and healthy. Course topics will also introduce students to the fundamentals of nutrition in order to better understand the aphorism “We are what we eat” and how this motto aligns with the Italian culinary tradition. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Three days of food labs, one day of gastronomic walking tour.

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COURSE: FWDNHN150
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, 4, A, B

Studies have shown that following the Mediterranean diet has many health benefits, especially when combined with exercise. This course includes lectures on various forms of physical and lifestyle activities and an overview of their respective health benefits. Lectures will also include visits to athletic centres within the local community and the nutritional aspects of the Mediterranean diet, and particularly the Italian culinary tradition. Cooking labs, wine tastings, and physical activity are integral components of the course and will result in the creation of a customised exercise and nutritional program by the student. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.

This course includes cooking labs and various physical activities in relevant locations in Florence.

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COURSE: FWDNIN305
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course introduces students to the basic nutrition concepts such as calories, nutrient density, and dietary reference intake. Through the course, the characteristics and the role of the basic nutrients (protein, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, and minerals) will be closely examined and different food combinations analysed and discussed. The concept of the food pyramid will be extensively studied along with the food pyramid and a cultural and scientific comparison between various diets including the Mediterranean, USA, traditional Latin American, Asian, and vegetarian versions. Menu composition and meal planning will be discussed from the nutritionist’s point of view.

NOTE: This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits.

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COURSE: FWDNLN160
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.

This course includes cooking labs and various physical activities in relevant locations in Florence.

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COURSE: FWCANC505
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts Majors only.

The course offers a survey and classification of macro and micro nutrients for the development and analysis of nutritionally balanced meals. Students will learn the fundamentals of metabolism and digestion to apply nutritional concepts to a wide variety of ingredients utilised in satisfying dishes that respect nutritional values. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of special dietary requirements depending on special dietary needs or ethical choices. Raw foodism, vegetarian and vegan diets, as well as alternatives to guarantee a balanced nutritional intake will be thoroughly covered. The course provides students with the tools to design meals on a seasonal basis following the principles of healthy cooking. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. EL hours include Special EL Project Friday Dinners at Ganzo.

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COURSE: BUMAEF280 / SHSSEF280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A

This course provides the opportunity to understand and appreciate the facility operations and event management in the sport industry. Course topics will focus on various aspects of business, legal, and operational practices in the sports field. The class will feature lecture hours as well as real-life practice through the development of both facility management and sports events projects. Students will be engaged within the community and will be able to learn-by-doing, applying business theories and frameworks to the projects development. Coursework will enhance the students’ perspective and awareness of business issues from both a technical and a cultural point of view.

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COURSE: FWFCFF347
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and cultural scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities; encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence’s thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings and visits. This is a Food and Culture course, not a CA/BP lab course. Food labs emphasise the food culture of Italy and are not based on professional cooking techniques.

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COURSE: HPFBSF300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Considering the renewed global interest in local sourcing and the growth of Km0 practices (locally produced), the study of sustainable food systems is an essential component in the education of an ethically-minded food industry learner. The course takes its cue from the Italian example based on regionalism and the table as an expression of local territories, and how these factors have influenced the national food industry. It analyses the industry and the production of food (fish, meat, dairy, fruit, vegetables, and grains) and focuses on packaging, traceability (labels), and distribution while exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analysed, as well as case studies in Italian food and beverage service and retailing. A strong focus is placed on seasonality, food policies, and food education.

The course objective is to provide students with a solid conceptual framework in order to analyse the Italian food industry and the food production system from a sustainable perspective. Through the understanding of the broader concept of sustainability, students will be able to explore the social, economic, and environmental implications of food production and consumption and to identify the global threats in terms of public health. Students will develop critical skills by analysing sustainability as active citizens, consumers, and entrepreneurs. The analysis and rethinking of economic, social, and agricultural alternatives in the current food production system will also be developed. Lectures will be complemented by visits, food tours, tastings, and cooking labs.

NOTE: This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits.

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COURSE: FWCATF340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Italian culinary tradition is the result of a long and complex historical, social and cultural process that can be fully understood through a careful analysis of the many aspects of Italian cultural heritage. In the past, food was characterised by the use of locally available ingredients and alimentary habits slowly became established and codified along with the specialisation and the improvement of regionally different production methods. Nevertheless, nutrition and cooking underwent substantial changes and profound transformations through the centuries, often resulting from historical and political events that affected the economy, the production, and the distribution of goods.

This course introduces students to Italian gastronomical traditions through the analysis of the main ingredients and the traditional preparations that have contributed to make Italian cuisine the most popular and imitated. Students will be introduced to the world of Italian quality ingredients thanks to a survey of DOP, IGP, and Slow Food Presidia quality certifications. The fundamental traditional cooking methods, techniques, and preparations utilised in Italian cuisine will be thoroughly covered and sampled in class. Course topics will be analysed through a focus on cultural background, origins, production processes, technical features and application in Italian cuisine. These experiences will prepare students continuing on to the advanced section of this course.

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COURSE: GSANWA300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational – as well as physical – experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of “wanderlust” will also be analysed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.

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COURSE: IDRHAA355 / LAAHAA355
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, A

This course explores the principal architects and artists, monuments, and themes from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italian art and architecture. Class time is divided equally between lectures and on-site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be placed on Renaissance architecture in Florence and will also include architectural developments in other Italian towns. Special topics will include architectural theory, the Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. Coursework will focus on important figures such as Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Michelangelo, and Leonardo, in addition to visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence.

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COURSE: LAPLBE320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course examines the ethics of medical practices and issues in contemporary society. Coursework will pose questions regarding areas that affect human life and death. Topics include practices such as euthanasia, birth control and abortion, cloning, genetic engineering, and biomedical research. Students will analyse the ethical nature of covered practices, how they affect humans on individual and social scales, and the relationship between patients and physicians and medical structures in terms of information, consent, and responsibility. Case studies from local European as well as non-European countries will be closely considered for discussion and study.

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COURSE: FAPDFS225
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, 4, B

This course is designed to take full advantage of the student’s unique experiences living and studying in the city of Florence. With on-site inspiration channelled into artistic creativity, students will draw on location at sites of historical significance and visual interest, ranging from architectural masterpieces, landscape vistas, and medieval streets to formal gardens, street markets, and Renaissance fountains. Slide lectures will document the rich history of how Florence and its environs have attracted and inspired visiting artists over the centuries. Students will develop individual sketchbooks with the aim of building up source material for future projects.

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COURSE: GSUSFW280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course examines the city of Florence with themed walks offering a comprehensive approach to the city as an open-air cultural, historical, and artistic research site from its Roman foundation to its contemporary Zeitgeist. Students will learn the history of the city through its art: they will understand how buildings, streets, squares, and monuments can be mapped as living traces of multiple, overlapping layers of a complex past, and how to encode them in their personal appropriation of the city. Starting from learning how to decode the artistic environment of the city and to unveil its traces – both visible and invisible – the course aims at understanding the main social and cultural reasons underlying the existing shape of the city. The course explores traces and evidences from Roman times through Middle Ages, Renaissance, Mannerism and Baroque, up to Art Nouveau and contemporary Florence. Students will be provided with a consistent theoretical background related to relevant historic-artistic landmarks and their social and cultural context and main characters (Guelphs vs. Ghibellines, the Florentine Guilds, Dante, the Medici family, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Ghirlandaio, Ammannati, Pontormo, etc.). Students will be encouraged to develop their own experiential tools and strategies to approach the city through guided field learning activities that assess research, on-site involvement, and academic outcome for each themed walk in Florence.

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COURSE: LARSHC310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course will approach Christianity both as an institution and as an intellectual tradition from a historical point of view. Course topics will focus on the roots of Christianity, Christianity during the Roman Empire, the Medieval church, the Papacy, monasticism, the schism between the Western and Eastern Churches, the Protestant Reformation and the Counter-Reformation, as well as the challenges faced by contemporary Christianity. The course will include visits to churches and monasteries in Florence.

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COURSE: LAHSIR330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course explores the meaning of the term “Renaissance” when applied to the period of Italian history from circa 1350 to 1550. The subject will be approached from a variety of standpoints: social, political, economic, intellectual, scientific, and artistic. The focus will be on the concept of Italian Renaissance Humanism and on the relationship between art and society during this period. Lectures will be supplemented by a number of visits to key historical sites in Florence. Field activities and museum visits are an integral part of the course.

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COURSE: ISITIB101
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, 3, 4, A, B

This course develops basic conversation, reading, and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary, and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to express themselves in basic sentences, recognize gender and number in both nouns and adjectives, and begin approaching the Passato Prossimo. Emphasis will be given to the oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before.

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COURSE: ISITIB165
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This intensive six-credit course is intended for students with no prior knowledge of Italian. It will give students the opportunity to experience a total language immersion, learning how to use gradually more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background, and understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. The course will start from linguistic fundamentals and essential grammatical structures, including singular and plural forms of articles, adjectives, nouns, and their agreement; regular and some irregular conjugations of -are, -ere, -ire verbs in the Present tense; and simple prepositions. It will then move on to reflexive verbs, conjugation of regular and irregular verbs in the Past, and direct object pronouns. It will finally introduce students to Future and Conditional tenses, possessive adjectives, and indirect object pronouns, along with the continued practice of expanding vocabulary and gradual building of complexity in grammatical structures. All lessons will be taught in Italian.

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COURSE: ISITII215
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

Pre-requisites: One semester of Italian language or equivalent. Italian Language Placement Test required.

This intensive six-credit course is intended for students who have previously completed one semester of elementary Italian language studies at the undergraduate level. It will give students the opportunity to experience a total language immersion, building on and extending fundamental skills developed in the elementary course. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to communicate in both written and oral form about topics they are familiar with pertaining to personal interests (i.e. family, hobbies, work, travel), as well as simple aspects of Italian culture. The grammatical structures covered will start with a review of Passato Prossimo and introduce Imperfetto conjugations, direct object pronouns, Future and Conditional tenses, possessive adjectives, and indirect object pronouns, followed by Trapassato Prossimo, Pronomi Relativi and Combinati, Imperativo, and a basic grasp of the four Subjunctive tenses. All lessons will be taught in Italian.

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COURSE: LAAHAH210
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This introductory art history course will take students through Italian and European art from the classical Greek and Roman periods up to and including the eighteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to Florentine and Italian art of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries and to the “Golden Age” of the Renaissance. The course is aimed at students who have not taken a history of western art course before. Lectures will alternate with on-site teaching in Florence including architectural walking tours and visits to relevant museums, churches, and palaces.

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COURSE: LAAHIR220
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This introductory course is intended for students who have little to no background in the history of Western Art. Before examining the beginnings of Renaissance art that took flourished in Florence in the fifteenth century, students will be given a broad overview of Greek and Roman art and architecture, whose emulation is fundamental to understanding the cultural revolution of the Renaissance. Through on-site visits to medieval churches and palaces in Florence, students will early on become familiar with the Romanesque and Gothic styles in which the first Renaissance painters, sculptors, and architects found their roots and from which they were to dramatically diverge. As site visits are a significant part of this course, the focus will be on Florentine artists such as Masaccio, Donatello, Brunelleschi, Fra Angelico, Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, and Michelangelo. By way of comparison, consideration will also be given to other important centers of art in Italy such as Venice, Siena, and Ferrara. In addition to analysing the style and subject matter of works of art, students will learn about the techniques of painting and sculpture and comparisons will be made with techniques in other countries during the same period, for example the use of oil paints in Flemish painting. This course features a journalism project with Blending.

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COURSE: ISITIA301
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session A

Pre-requisites: Four semesters of Italian language or equivalent. Italian Language Placement Test required.

This level is for those students who already have a sound knowledge of Italian grammar and are able to express themselves fluently and articulately using all past tenses. Students should have familiarity with Subjunctive and Conditional tenses in both written and spoken Italian. During the course they will improve vocabulary and comprehension by reading and discussing literary tests as well as newspaper articles on current affairs, culture, and politics. Students will perfect their skills in the use of all verb tenses acquired at the intermediate levels and study the Passive voice.

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COURSE: ISITII201
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

Pre-requisites: One semester of Italian language or equivalent. Italian Language Placement Test required.

This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginning-level course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. Upon course completion, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present Conditional and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.

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COURSE: ISITII250
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, 4, A, B

Pre-requisites: Two semesters of Italian language or equivalent. Italian Language Placement Test required.

This level is for those students who already have an active knowledge of elementary language structures (i.e. the expression of past actions and events, discussion of future plans), can communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background, and can understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to use more complex pronouns both in spoken and written Italian and will have a basic grasp of the following topics: Condizionale, Trapassato Prossimo, Pronomi Relativi, Imperativo and a basic grasp of the four tenses of Subjunctive.

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COURSE: IDRHAR340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course explores the principal architects, monuments and themes of fifteenth and sixteenth century Italian architecture. The course includes site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be on Renaissance architecture in Florence, but will also include architectural developments in Rome, Urbino, Mantua, Verona and Vicenza. Special topics will include: architectural theory, Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. A special focus will be dedicated to architects: Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Giuliano Sangallo, Bramante, Antonio Sangallo the Younger, Michelangelo, Giulio Romano and Palladio. Visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence are included.

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COURSE: GSDGSR350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Beginning with an examination of the “how to” advice manuals common to Italian households during the Renaissance period, this course explores various aspects of sexuality in Renaissance Italy. These aspects range from the aforementioned self-help books aimed at instructing young couples in sexual pleasure, to conception and childbirth, and an examination of the differing social roles of the common prostitute (meretrice) and the high class courtesan (cortigiana). The theme of male homosexuality will also be explored with special focus placed on the intellectual climate of Renaissance Florence where the prevailing interest in Neoplatonic philosophy may have played a part in creating a more lenient moral climate for homosexuals. Discussions will take cue from Renaissance art in which erotic subjects became increasingly popular in courtly circles in the sixteenth century. Museum visits form an integral part of this course.

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COURSE: GSDGNN351
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session B

This course is centred around Ferrante’s four-volume work known as The Neapolitan Novels: My Brilliant Friend (2011), The Story of a New Name (2012), Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (2013), The Story of the Lost Child (2015). Lectures will investigate the multifaceted universe of a friendship between two women, Lila and Lenù, from their childhood to adulthood. It also aims to shed light on the connections between their experiences and Southern Italy’s complex history and culture from the post-WWII war years to the present. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course will examine the protagonists’ effort to break out of the circle of extreme poverty, illiteracy, and male violence.

Amongst the themes addressed by this course through the study The Neapolitan Novels, students will explore issues such as post-war settlement in Italy and in the South, Italy’s Southern Question, the Neapolitan Camorra and its influence on the poor, the changing role of women during the Seventies, the “Economic Miracle”, terrorism during the “anni di piombo”, student movements in the late Sixties, Italian factory strikes throughout the Seventies, and technological advancements for computing machines.

This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural; because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multi-fold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centred process.

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COURSE: LARSRW320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course will examine the presentation and position of women in major world religious traditions such as Christianity and Islam. Other religions, including pagan and neo-pagan cults and religions, will be introduced for comparative purposes. Much use will be made of religious texts, feminist criticism, and the study of the visual arts. Lectures will be enhanced by on-site teaching in Florence in order to examine the depiction of female saints in Italian art in the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods.

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COURSE: IDRHFY320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course spans the history of Italian gardens from the 1200s to the 1700s. The course explores the evolution of the Italian garden landscape starting from the ancient Roman roots and the emergence of herbal gardens in medieval monasteries for medicinal remedies to the flourishing of early Renaissance masterpieces in the great palaces and villas of Italy. The early transformation of the garden from functional to recreational purposes will be examined in religious and humanistic contexts. A second phase of evolution from the recreation to symbols of power will be introduced through the gardens of ruling families and religious figures who combined garden aesthetics with experimentation and horticultural innovation until the late Renaissance. The course will conclude with the waning of the Italian garden in the 18th century, which ceded the domination of Italian gardens to the landscaping practices of France.

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COURSE: FTFCSC280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Through a series of walks and visits through art and design this course intends to show famous and hidden fashion paths in Florence. A journey through time and space to discover the place that marked the birth of Italian fashion and opened the doors to Made in Italy. Back in 1954 Florence was the star of the fashion system, anticipating trends and steeling the exclusive scene from Paris. Italy embraced the “new”in fashion through the talent and genius of Giovanni Battista Giorgini, who staged the first ever Italian fashion shows in Florence. Students will discover a city of exquisite taste, tradition and artistic craftsmanship.

Starting from the location of the first Italian cat walk held in the Sala Bianca of Palazzo Pitti, they will learn how to map the fashion environment of the city. From Renaissance to modern day inspiration, fashion is kept alive in the products that were designed here and that grace the beautiful city today. Designers, such as Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Emilio Pucci, Stefano Ricci, Ermanno Scervino, and Roberto Cavalli, have all developed and changed through the years and they have all surely blossomed here in Florence.

The course is intended to provide academic knowledge through guided field learning activities that include research, on-site involvement, and topic assessment for each fashion themed walk in Florence. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students’ academic and personal enrichment.

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COURSE: GSHSAY190 / LARSAY190
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course provides students with an introduction to the art of yoga and meditation to gain an understanding of the philosophical and spiritual contexts that the discipline is rooted in. The course investigation begins with the notion of awareness, and the acquisition of the term through an overview of the principal asanas and their correct practice. The spiritual aspects of yoga are experienced in the form of various meditation techniques from different philosophies as well as the study of pranayama breathing exercises. Topics also include an examination of yoga props as well as dietary and nutritional guidelines, studied through the lens of yoga philosophy gleaned from sacred texts. The course will cover yoga traditions from ancient times to more contemporary interpretations.

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COURSE: BUERFB310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Family enterprises have always been central to the social and economic fabric of Italy. Some of the world’s oldest family companies are Italian and the city of Florence represents a very important starting point. The course will explore the evolution, characteristics, and significance of Italian family firms and also analyse the changes and trends in Italian family businesses over the centuries, how a 2,000-year-old system is reacting to an age of increasing European unity and integration, mass immigration to Italy, and globalisation and competition with China and India. The first part of the course will provide an overview of the history of family-owned firms from the Roman Empire to the present day and their role in the social, political, and economic life of Italy. The second part will consider case studies in different sectors: wine and food, fashion, the automobile industry and the hospitality sector. Site visits to family enterprises in and around Florence are an integral part of the course.

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COURSE: GSANWA300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational – as well as physical – experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of “wanderlust” will also be analysed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.

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COURSE: LARSWR300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This is an introductory comparative study of the world’s major religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and the religions of China and Japan. The course will examine a significant number of specific themes in all religions studied: the nature of this world and universe, the relationship between the individual and the transcendent, ultimate reality, the meaning and goals of worldly life, the importance of worship and rituals, the importance of devotion to the master or guru, ethics, and human action. Excerpts from important texts of each tradition will be analysed.

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COURSE: CPCRCM360 / HPHTCM360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and La Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been produced and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropolises and developing destinations will be examined.

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COURSE: LACRCM390
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course presents the specific structural and phenomenological aspects of the various types of mafia operating in Italy and internationally. Topics analyse contemporary criminal, social, cultural, and political features of mafia-related groups and explore traditional and emerging illegal markets. The course describes main Italian and international law policies and legislations to contrast this type of organised crime and the experiences of leading individuals and groups developing a culture of legality to combat the mafia.

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COURSE: GSANCI202 / ISISCI202 / LAAHCI202 / LSSOCI202
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one’s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills.

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COURSE: FWFSIF320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the development and structure of the Italian family through history with the following topics: Sexuality and the development of relationships, study of individuals, groups, and families, diversity in modern families, community regulations/policies addressing issues of family change, crisis, and maintenance. Students will conduct evaluation of different styles and examples of interpersonal communication behaviours. The course will also compare and contrast family/individual behaviour patterns associated with human life cycle transitions and examine various social issues associated with the study of Italian families.

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COURSE: LAPYCS310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Pre-requisite: Background in Psychology or Social Psychology is recommended.

Over the recent decades, globalisation has brought about a phenomenon that has increasingly been recognised by both psychologists and anthropologists as a viable field of research: Culture Shock. Also referred to as “culture fatigue” or “role shock,” culture shock refers to the reactions of travellers during their first few months in a foreign country. This course presents culture shock within the context of cross-cultural psychology and places a specific emphasis on the students’ own experiences as they live and study in a foreign country. Topics explored will include the role of communication and communication norms, cultural variables, taboos and rituals, and cultural adjustment.

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COURSE: LAPYAD290
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course examines the practice and basic principles of addiction to drugs of abuse such as heroin, alcohol, tobacco, cannabis or cocaine. Course topics will cover the epidemiology of drug abuse, the experimental models used in brain research, and the pathological consequences of drug addiction (including heavy drinking and smoking). The course will extend the concept of addiction to pathological behaviours such as compulsive consumption of palatable food, physical exercise dependence, compulsive shopping, sexual hyperactivity, internet abuse, and gambling. The neurochemical mechanisms that are shared and lead from reward to positive reinforcement, loss of control, and dependence will be examined. The symptomatological and neurochemical similarities and differences between drug and behavioural addiction will be addressed, along with the self-destructive behaviours, tolerance, craving, and withdrawal symptoms that both types of dependence produce.

The course traces also the basic aspects of human biology and physiology that are needed to fully comprehend the topics at hand, including the neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters that are altered by both natural and artificial rewards. Students will also learn how to analyse scientific data and correctly interpret the information that is published in peer-reviewed international scientific journals. Finally, students will gain an understanding of the social and ethical implications of drug and behavioural addiction and of the peculiar features of this problem in different countries, with an emphasis on the European and Italian approach as compared with other areas of the world.

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COURSE: FTFCFM300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the context in which the Italian fashion system was born. Topics begin from the evolution of fashion from the post-WWII period to the present and address the role and influence of media and culture on factors such as economic and social status, the arts, and other issues that influenced fashion. Students explore fashion’s connection to identity, body, politics, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and how fashion and media are interrelated with these aspects of culture.

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COURSE: FWFCFC340 / LSSOFC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, A, B

This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as “made in Italy” culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism, and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and/or tastings.

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COURSE: FWCACC350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as “social creatures”. Italy represents a unique case for how food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society.

This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Food labs twice a week, one aperitivo project shift per session.

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COURSE: FWWCWC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyse the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.

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COURSE: FWWCWC345
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyse the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course.

This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centred process.

This course includes an Italian language component for beginning language students + 90 field learning hours.

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COURSE: GSDGSR350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Beginning with an examination of the “how to” advice manuals common to Italian households during the Renaissance period, this course explores various aspects of sexuality in Renaissance Italy. These aspects range from the aforementioned self-help books aimed at instructing young couples in sexual pleasure, to conception and childbirth, and an examination of the differing social roles of the common prostitute (meretrice) and the high class courtesan (cortigiana). The theme of male homosexuality will also be explored with special focus placed on the intellectual climate of Renaissance Florence where the prevailing interest in Neoplatonic philosophy may have played a part in creating a more lenient moral climate for homosexuals. Discussions will take cue from Renaissance art in which erotic subjects became increasingly popular in courtly circles in the sixteenth century. Museum visits form an integral part of this course.

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COURSE: LACRRM350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the relationship between gender inequality and the legal system. Topics include abortion, marriage, divorce, custody, equal pay, sexual harassment, rape, pornography, and prostitution. Students are introduced to basic legal research tools, such as statutes, regulations, cases, and legal literature. Bride kidnapping, also known as marriage by abduction or marriage by capture, is a practice known throughout history and around the world through which a man abducts the woman he wishes to marry.

Specific case studies will be covered such as the “fuitina” in Italy, which was a widespread practice in Sicily and the south. In theory and in some cases, it was an agreed elopement between two youngsters, in practice it was often a forcible kidnapping and rape followed by a so-called “rehabilitating marriage” (matrimonio riparatore). In 1965, this custom was brought to national attention by the case of 17-year-old Franca Viola, abducted and raped by a local small-time criminal, with the assistance of a dozen of his friends. When she was returned to her family after a week, she refused to marry her abductor, contrary to local expectations. Her family courageously supported her decision, and suffered severe intimidation for their efforts. Ultimately, the kidnappers were arrested and the main perpetrator was sentenced to 11 years in prison. The exposure of this archaic and intransigent system of values and behavioural mores caused great national debate. A 1970 film, “La moglie più bella” (The Most Beautiful Wife) by Damiano Damiani and starring Ornella Muti, is based on the case. Article 544 of the Italian Penal Code was amended only in 1981, when by law, rape could not be cancelled by marriage.

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COURSE: LARSRW320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course will examine the presentation and position of women in major world religious traditions such as Christianity and Islam. Other religions, including pagan and neo-pagan cults and religions, will be introduced for comparative purposes. Much use will be made of religious texts, feminist criticism, and the study of the visual arts. Lectures will be enhanced by on-site teaching in Florence in order to examine the depiction of female saints in Italian art in the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods.

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COURSE: LAPYSP300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

“We see the world as we do, not because that is the way it is, but because we have these ways of seeing” (Wittgenstein). Social psychology is a scientific discipline that explores how the individual is influenced by social contexts. Students will learn to identify how social, environmental, and cognitive factors shape our thoughts, feelings, and actions. The course covers theories regarding attraction, aggression, conformity, and pro-social behaviour. As this course is taught in Italy, students will have the advantage of observing and testing theories learned in class in a foreign environment.

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COURSE: FWFCFF347
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and cultural scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities; encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence’s thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings and visits. This is a Food and Culture course, not a CA/BP lab course. Food labs emphasise the food culture of Italy and are not based on professional cooking techniques.

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COURSE: FWCATF340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Italian culinary tradition is the result of a long and complex historical, social and cultural process that can be fully understood through a careful analysis of the many aspects of Italian cultural heritage. In the past, food was characterised by the use of locally available ingredients and alimentary habits slowly became established and codified along with the specialisation and the improvement of regionally different production methods. Nevertheless, nutrition and cooking underwent substantial changes and profound transformations through the centuries, often resulting from historical and political events that affected the economy, the production, and the distribution of goods.

This course introduces students to Italian gastronomical traditions through the analysis of the main ingredients and the traditional preparations that have contributed to make Italian cuisine the most popular and imitated. Students will be introduced to the world of Italian quality ingredients thanks to a survey of DOP, IGP, and Slow Food Presidia quality certifications. The fundamental traditional cooking methods, techniques, and preparations utilised in Italian cuisine will be thoroughly covered and sampled in class. Course topics will be analysed through a focus on cultural background, origins, production processes, technical features and application in Italian cuisine. These experiences will prepare students continuing on to the advanced section of this course.

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COURSE: SMPHGP200
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session B

Pre-requisite: Calculus l

The principles of physics are the basis of modern technology. Understanding the concepts of physics and knowing how to solve physics-related problems are a key requirement for success in advanced studies in all technical fields including biology, medicine, and the health sciences. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the principles and processes of the physical world with an emphasis on problem-solving and critical thinking. Topics include: the dynamics and behaviour of matter, their motion, the forces involved, the exchanges of energy, force, momentum, and the basics of concepts such as space and time. Students taking General Physics I will develop an understanding of the physical aspects of nature and learn the scientific method and its application to scientific inquiries. In-class discussion along with group and individual work will enhance and consolidate students’ understanding of basic physical principles and applications.

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COURSE: SMPHGP201
CREDITS: 1 US credit / 30 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session B

Lab component of General Physics I (please see separate course description). Lab hours are designed to provide direct technical and technological applications of lecture material.

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COURSE: SMCHHC470
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Pre-requisite: Background in Psychology or Social Psychology is recommended.

Throughout history, science and chemistry have shaped the evolution of the world. This course follows the emergence of chemistry as a discipline throughout the ages, particularly from an Italian perspective and how it has been influenced by politics, morality, and society. Lessons will include a survey of renowned Italian scientists and their ground-breaking contributions that subsequently shaped the course of history and the field of chemistry as we know it today. Students will gain a working knowledge of the history and techniques used in the analysis and transformation of matter, and become familiar with the Periodic Table of Elements and the bonding of molecules.

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COURSE: HPFBSF300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Considering the renewed global interest in local sourcing and the growth of Km0 practices (locally produced), the study of sustainable food systems is an essential component in the education of an ethically-minded food industry learner. The course takes its cue from the Italian example based on regionalism and the table as an expression of local territories, and how these factors have influenced the national food industry. It analyses the industry and the production of food (fish, meat, dairy, fruit, vegetables, and grains) and focuses on packaging, traceability (labels), and distribution while exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analysed, as well as case studies in Italian food and beverage service and retailing. A strong focus is placed on seasonality, food policies, and food education.

The course objective is to provide students with a solid conceptual framework in order to analyse the Italian food industry and the food production system from a sustainable perspective. Through the understanding of the broader concept of sustainability, students will be able to explore the social, economic, and environmental implications of food production and consumption and to identify the global threats in terms of public health. Students will develop critical skills by analysing sustainability as active citizens, consumers, and entrepreneurs. The analysis and rethinking of economic, social, and agricultural alternatives in the current food production system will also be developed. Lectures will be complemented by visits, food tours, tastings, and cooking labs.

NOTE: This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits.

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Excursions

Included in the program are a number of both CISaustralia and FUA organised excursions and activities. Our CISaustralia Site Directors in Florence will arrange a number of activities to help immerse participants in the Florentine culture. Past excursions have included:

  • Orientation and welcome dinner
  • Gelato activity
  • Cooking class
  • River cruise
  • Mount Ceceri Quarries + hike
  • Day trip to locations such as Greve (in Chianti) or Lucca
  • A trip to the local markets to learn how to buy local produce

In addition, most FUA courses have one Educational Field Trip (EFT) included, where students will go out into the city for an experience relevant to their studies. FUA prides itself on its EFTs. Your CISaustralia program fee includes at least one EFT, typically either a weekend or day trip, depending on what FUA has planned for that year. Your CISaustralia Program Advisor will pre-select your EFT during the enrolment process. Some past EFTs:

  • Taste of Italy: Flavours of Parma & Modena (day trip)
  • Arts and Flavours of Tuscany: Montepulciano & Pienza (day trip)
  • Chocolate and Fashion: A History of Italian Signature Products (day trip)
  • Rome: Eternal City (weekend trip)

FUA also offers non-mandatory EFTs which are activities that are not included in any courses. Participants are able to sign up for non-mandatory EFTs once they are onsite for an additional fee, paid direct to FUA.

Location

This medium-sized city is perfect for the July in Florence program. It won’t take you more than a few days to learn your way around but with so much to do, your time will go quickly. Make sure to check out the historic city centre, outlying towns and the beautiful snow capped Apennine Mountains.

Florence is the capital of the charming Tuscan region in Italy and has a population of around 400,000 people. Although a famous tourist destination, Florentines (locals) know where to find the best osterias (restaurants), boutiques and stores which are often hidden away from the tourist crowds.

Geographically, Italy is located in south central Europe, close to neighbouring countries such as France, Greece and Spain – it’s a traveller’s delight. Italy is shaped like a high-heeled boot kicking a triangle, which is the island of Sicily.

Italy borders France, Austria and Switzerland to the north and also borders Slovenia along the Alps. The islands of Sicily and Sardinia also form part of the country.

The University

Your July in Florence program will be hosted at the Florence University of the Arts (FUA).

The University is located in the heart of this magic city so you will have easy, walking accessibility to some of the country’s most famous tourist attractions. The Ponte Vecchio and the Basilica of Santa Croce are just minutes from the campus!

Unique to the CISaustralia program are small class sizes, ensuring you receive dedicated attention from your teacher. Your lecturers will come from Italy and across Europe, and class sizes range from 8-25 students and are taught in English (except for your Italian language course!).

The University campus has a fully functioning restaurant that is completely managed, catered, and run by FUA students. This is a unique aspect of the campus and allows you to enjoy this social, cultural experience firsthand.

During your time in Florence, you will become a part of the community, living in your own Florentine apartment and enjoying the many restaurants, cafés and bars throughout this famous city!

Culture in Italy is extremely connected to the food. Italians are known for their wood fired pizzas, olive oil and crusty bread, fresh pasta and desserts. You will certainly never be hungry in this country!

Start packing, because you’re about to embark on the adventure of a lifetime in this thriving and distinctly charming Italian city.

Accommodation

This program in Florence provides you with a fully-furnished apartment, shared with 4-6 other students from around the world. Bedrooms are single-sex shared, with between 2-4 students per room.

All apartments are within a 20-minute walk from FUA facilities/campuses.

All apartments offer spacious living areas and are fully furnished with:

  • Bed linen and pillows
  • Fridge, oven, stove
  • Basic cookware and utensils
  • Washing machine
  • TV
  • Internet access/Wifi

The apartments are self-catered, meaning you will need to prepare your own meals – a fun time to share cuisine, a fine wine and stories from around the world, or laugh about your day in Florence. The apartments are located within walking distance to some of Florence’s best markets, stores, restaurants and museums. Take advantage of the local restaurants nearby or buy your own food at the markets and cook at home.

Bedrooms are shared between at least two students, and some bedrooms may be shared between three or more students. You may request a single bedroom for an extra fee, subject to availability.

The apartments are older-style housing, so they do not have air-conditioning or clothes dryers. Please be aware that the apartment buildings also house non-students and as such, there is a very strict noise policy. Overnight guests are not permitted in your accommodation.

Program Fee & Dates

Session 1: May-June 2020 (3 weeks)
Application Deadline02 March 2020
Arrival Date17 May 2020
Departure Date05 June 2020
Program Fee A$ 6,399 - 8,499
OS-HELP A$ 6,913
Session 2: June 2020 (3 weeks)
Application Deadline06 April 2020
Arrival Date07 June 2020
Departure Date26 June 2020
Program Fee A$ 6,399 - 8,499
OS-HELP A$ 6,913
Session 3: June-July 2020 (3 weeks)
Application Deadline06 April 2020
Arrival Date28 June 2020
Departure Date17 July 2020
Program Fee A$ 6,399 - 8,499
OS-HELP A$ 6,913
Session 4: July-August 2020 (3 weeks)
Application Deadline04 May 2020
Arrival Date19 July 2020
Departure Date07 August 2020
Program Fee A$ 6,399 - 8,499
OS-HELP A$ 6,913
Session A: May-June 2020 (6 weeks)
Application Deadline02 March 2020
Arrival Date17 May 2020
Departure Date26 June 2020
Program Fee A$ 7,999 - 9,999
OS-HELP A$ 6,913
Session B: June-August 2020 (6 weeks)
Application Deadline06 April 2020
Arrival Date28 June 2020
Departure Date07 August 2020
Program Fee A$ 7,999 - 9,999
OS-HELP A$ 6,913

 

Program fees include the following:
  • Tuition fees
  • CISaustralia support services before, during and after the program
  • Academic advising
  • Financial advice
  • Assistance with travel arrangements
  • Medical and accident insurance (if requested)
  • Pre-departure guide and session
  • Airport pick-up (on specified program arrival date within designated arrival times)
  • Shared apartment accommodation (additional fee for a single room*)
  • 10 meal plan units per week**
  • Free use of gym and gym classes
  • FUA Educational Field Trip (EFT) included with most courses, but not all
  • CISaustralia 24/7 on-site support – Site Director
  • Florence University of the Arts transcript
  • University of South Florida official transcript***
  • CISaustralia Certificate of Completion

Please note: Some courses may have an additional ‘materials fee’ payable on arrival. Specific course material fees are usually between $50 and $100.

*Housing is limited and we cannot guarantee a single room. If we are unable to assign you to a single room, we will refund you the additional fee paid.

**10 meal plan units per week equates to approximately 5-10 meals per week at one of FUA’s eateries, e.g. 1 plate of pasta (dinner) = 2 units, 1 snack (lunch) = 1 unit

***University of South Florida will also provide an official transcript as the School of Record (SOR). SOR: A U.S. accredited institution of higher education that officially documents and awards credits for programs or institutions that are not accredited in the U.S., verifying appropriately all elements necessary for such official documentation.

What is not included:

  • Flights
  • Travel insurance
  • Visa fees
  • Vaccinations (if required)
  • Meals (unless mentioned above)
  • Extra travel/excursions (other than those mentioned above)

Dates are for reference only and are subject to change. Please do not book flights until you have received the confirmed dates in your acceptance paperwork.

CISaustralia reserves the right to alter fees at any time due to currency fluctuations and/or fee changes made by our partner universities.

Adventure Awaits

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