July in Florence, Italy

 

Spend your winter enjoying a European summer while earning credit towards your degree – sound like a good deal? Spend 3 or 6 weeks in the cradle of the Renaissance and see why travelers can never get enough of Florence.

Program Overview

As a student in the Tuscan city of Florence, you will quickly feel like a local as you wander through busy piazzas in search of your favourite pasta trattoria! The Florence University of the Arts (FUA) is where you will spend your July in Florence program.

Here you’ll be able to experiene:

Variety of program session options – You can you spend 3 or 6 weeks in Florence, with a variety of session start dates to align with your winter break.

Genuine Tuscan food – Everywhere you look you will see and smell local, family-owned cafés and restaurants offering the very best of Italian cuisine. Pasta, pizza, tiramisu and local red wine – life won’t get any better!

Courses in your major, plus exciting electives – Study within your major to further your degree in Australia or attempt a new hobby by taking an elective such as Intro to Photography. Or study Italian in Florence – what better place to learn a new language?

Location, location, location – During your July in Florence program, you will be based in such close proximity to neighbouring European countries. Fancy a quick getaway to Spain or France for some cheese and baguette, or maybe a long weekend swimming in Santorini?

An art lover’s paradise – View famous masterpieces in museums such as the Uffizi Gallery, then purchase your own treasure from a local street artist. You can also choose to take art classes such as photography and painting.

History brought to life – If you’ve heard of the Medici family, you will know that Florence is the best city in the world to discover their history. Spend the morning listening to a class lecture on the powerful Medici family, then walk just minutes from campus to see where the family lived during the Renaissance.

Escape the Aussie Winter – Enjoy a European summer in place of ugg boots, jumpers and frosty mornings.

Highlights

If you’ve ever wanted to study abroad in Italy and perhaps have limited time, then July in Florence is for you!

Here are a few of the key highlights that make this program unique:

  • The July program is flexible and allows you the option of staying in Florence for 3 or 6 weeks while earning credit for 1 or 2 courses
  • Study Italian in Florence – Courses are taught in English, or in full Italian for more advanced speakers
  • Smaller class sizes of 8 to 25 students mean you will receive personalised teaching and close attention from the academic team
  • Numerous options for experiencing the city’s music, art, dance, food and more
  • Cook for yourself in your apartment or enjoy food from the local market and many restaurants
  • Vibrant campus life with fully equipped gym, library and internet access
  • Everything you could ever need or want is within walking distance of the Florence city centre
  • Enjoy a social calendar full of exciting cultural activities – some activities you may choose to do include aperitivo in the piazza, exploring Florence’s local boutique and markets, wine tasting at nearby wineries, art galleries, music events… the list is endless!
  • World-class location – it’s a tourist’s dream destination and you will be living the authentic Italian lifestyle
  • Organised accommodation with fellow international students – immediate friends!

Choose Your Course

July in Florence is offered at Florence University of the Arts (FUA). There is a wide selection and variety of courses on offer each session.

Course Load: 1-2 courses per session. You may combine any of the sessions to study in Florence for up to 12 weeks! Please contact us for more details on this option.

  • Depending on your Australian university, “courses” may be referred to as “subjects” or “units”.
  • Each course/subject/unit you undertake on a CISaustralia program is designed to be a full-time, semester course that has been condensed to fit into an intensive, short-term program. As such, for any 1 course you study abroad, you should receive the credit points for 1 full-time course/subject/unit at your Australian university.
  • Many universities work off of a 1-for-1 equivalency (1 course abroad = 1 course in Australia), but ultimately credit approval is the decision of your faculty and Australian university.
  • CISaustralia strongly recommends that you have any overseas courses pre-approved for academic credit before you depart for your program. Some documentation that may be useful are the course outline/syllabus, program overview and the contact hours.
  • Before you head overseas we encourage all students to have a minimum of 3-4 courses approved by your home university in Australia (even if you are only planning a 3-week program). This will allow some flexibility in your class schedule and avoid timetable clashes. A CISaustralia program is a great opportunity to take some interesting electives if your degree allows!
  • Your CISaustralia Program Advisor can assist with any questions or details your university needs to make a decision.

How to Choose Your Courses: This is the fun part. As part of the application process you will complete a CISaustralia Course Selection Worksheet. The following instructions will guide you through the steps in choosing your courses.

Academic Requirement: To qualify for this program, students must be in good academic standing with a GPA of 4.5 (out of 7) or equivalent. If your current GPA falls below the requirement, you may still be considered for the program but will need to be prepared to provide supporting documentation. Please contact us to discuss your situation and we will work with you to help find another suitable program if required.

How to Read the FUA Course Catalog: 

  • Courses numbered 100–299 are for lower-division courses (usually your first and second year at Uni)
  • 300–399 are for upper-division courses (your third and last year at Uni)
  • 400–499 are for introductory courses to graduate studies (your third and fourth year – possible honours courses)
  • Course descriptions below that include multiple course numbers indicates it is multidisciplinary and credit is awarded by multiple academic departments

There are a few variables like the length of your degree and major. As for the letters, in ‘LA HS MI 280,’ for example, the first pair represents the college within the University (LA=Liberal Arts); the second, the department within the college (HS=History); and the third, the course within the department (MI=Modern Italy).

If you are finding it difficult to understand the course listings, please feel free to contact us!

Please note that each course indicates during which session it is offered – not every class is offered every session.

2022 Course Descriptions:

COURSE: FTFDAD320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course offers a solid foundation in the fundamentals of basic construction, draping, alterations, and fitting techniques for apparel. The emphasis of the course is on the importance of proper fit and craftsmanship for the overall quality of garments. Students develop and construct design concepts in muslin and soft fabric in the dress form.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: IDRHAA355 / LAAHAA355
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, A

This course explores the principal architects and artists, monuments, and themes from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italian art and architecture. Class time is divided equally between lectures and on-site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be placed on Renaissance architecture in Florence and will also include architectural developments in other Italian towns. Special topics will include architectural theory, the Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. Coursework will focus on important figures such as Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Michelangelo, and Leonardo, in addition to visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CPCRCM360 / HPHTCM360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and La Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been produced and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropolises and developing destinations will be examined.

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COURSE: FACECE200
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session 3, B

In this course, students will work on pottery and/or ceramic sculpture projects. During the first portion of the course, emphasis will be on different clay hand-building techniques. The second portion, students will progress to a variety of surface decoration techniques and different methods of firing and coloring. Lecture content will provide students essential information about the nature of clay and glazes and the history of Mediterranean ceramics. Students will be introduced to local Tuscan artisan traditions and the work of contemporary ceramic artists during field learning activities.

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COURSE: DIVCGI210
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Pre-requisite: Knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator highly recommended.

The course explores illustration as an instrument of communication (i.e. advertising) and narration (i.e. comic books). It aims at improving drawing and design skills by teaching image making with an emphasis on edge, shape, color and value. Students will learn how to apply composition and design, color, and conceptualization to a wide range of materials and techniques. Students will use illustration software to enhance traditional work and acquire important knowledge in the digital domain. Idea development within real-world parameters, originality, aesthetics, and technical proficiency are emphasized. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: FTFDFD230
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course is an introduction to creative design development and fashion design, offering students an overview of the contemporary visual culture and language related to fashion. Topics include design processes, rendering techniques, research, storyboard creation, color, fabric selection, design innovation, and the 2D to 3D development of creative ideas. Students will gain practice in these areas through projects while being introduced to fashion illustration. Students prepare for future apparel design projects by researching the design development process, textiles, materials, and industry practices. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: FTFCSF360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course addresses the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through lab practice gained by running a real enterprise in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Coursework includes site visits to well-known Italian luxury brands in Florence such as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FAPDFS225
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course is designed to take full advantage of the student’s unique experiences living and studying in the city of Florence. With on-site inspiration channeled into artistic creativity, students will draw on location at sites of historical significance and visual interest, ranging from architectural masterpieces, landscape vistas, and medieval streets to formal gardens, street markets, and Renaissance fountains. Slide lectures will document the rich history of how Florence and its environs have attracted and inspired visiting artists over the centuries. Students will develop individual sketchbooks with the aim of building up source material for future projects.

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COURSE: GSUSFW280 / LAAHFW280 / LAHSFW280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course examines the city of Florence with themed walks offering a comprehensive approach to the city as an open-air cultural, historical, and artistic research site from its Roman foundation to its contemporary Zeitgeist. Students will learn the history of the city through its art: they will understand how buildings, streets, squares, and monuments can be mapped as living traces of multiple, overlapping layers of a complex past, and how to encode them in their personal appropriation of the city. Starting from learning how to decode the artistic environment of the city and to unveil its traces – both visible and invisible – the course aims at understanding the main social and cultural reasons underlying the existing shape of the city.

The course explores traces and evidences from Roman times through Middle Ages, Renaissance, Mannerism and Baroque, up to Art Nouveau and contemporary Florence. Students will be provided with a consistent theoretical background related to relevant historic-artistic landmarks and their social and cultural context and main characters (Guelphs vs. Ghibellines, the Florentine Guilds, Dante, the Medici family, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Ghirlandaio, Ammannati, Pontormo, etc.). Students will be encouraged to develop their own experiential tools and strategies to approach the city through guided field learning activities that assess research, on-site involvement, and academic outcome for each themed walk in Florence.

The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students’ academic and personal enrichment.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FAAEGE345
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course introduces students to all aspects related to the operations and management of an art gallery and its exhibited content. Students will be involved in curating and promoting art shows and art-related events through community and on-campus exhibitions.

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COURSE: DIPHID180
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, A

This course introduces contemporary technologies for producing photographic images. Approaching the medium in its current complex and pluralistic state, students explore a variety of photographic concepts and techniques. The fundamentals of using a digital camera including manual exposure and lighting are stressed. The course also introduces seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical mind and eye in a foreign environment (Italy) to provide understanding of the construction and manipulation of photographic form and meaning. During the first half of the course assignments, lectures, readings progressively build on each other to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of camera functions (manual mode) and processing techniques. The second half of the course will focus on weaving the techniques with specific photographic concepts via assignments. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode. A DSLR camera plus a lens (focal length of 55mm or wider) with available manual settings is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera with available manual settings (24+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.

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COURSE: DIPHTP225
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course introduces students to photography with a particular focus on reportage and travel photography perspectives of this medium, offering a chance to explore the world through a camera viewfinder. Key course topics include learning to express a sense of place, capturing mood/feeling, and shooting a variety of subjects ranging from daily life to landscapes, urban settings, cultural portraits, festivals, and rituals. The course will be divided between outdoor field practice and learning introductory digital techniques. This course is recommended for students majoring in Communications, Journalism, and Tourism. Basic photography experience and knowledge will be helpful but not necessary. (not sure if needed) This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

NOTE: This course is for beginners. The first half of the course will be devoted to understanding camera functions and basic printing. During this period assignments will emphasize basic camera functions in manual mode. A DSLR camera plus a lens (focal length of 55mm or wider) with available manual settings is required for this course. A digital 35mm viewfinder camera with available manual settings (24+ megapixels minimum) is also acceptable.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FAPDWC180
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This foundation course will explore methods, techniques and various aspects of watercolour painting. The unique qualities of watercolour will be explored through direct observation exercises, demonstrations and individual projects. Watercolour techniques will be explored, including developing drawings to form strong compositions, capturing the effects of light, colour-mixing and washes. Students will develop their painting skills, techniques, and aesthetic sensibilities to artistic expression in watercolour medium. The class format consists of studio work with lectures, examples, demonstrations, and individual as well as group critiques. Reading and homework assignments are coordinated with the studio work.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: IDRHAR340 / LAAHAR340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course explores the principal architects, monuments and themes of fifteenth and sixteenth century Italian architecture. The course includes site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be on Renaissance architecture in Florence, but will also include architectural developments in Rome, Urbino, Mantua, Verona and Vicenza. Special topics will include: architectural theory, Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. A special focus will be dedicated to architects: Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Giuliano Sangallo, Bramante, Antonio Sangallo the Younger, Michelangelo, Giulio Romano and Palladio. Visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence are included.

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COURSE: DIPHLA300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Prerequisites: This is an intermediate course. Working knowledge of manual setting is required. Portfolio submission recommended.

The city of Florence, with its backdrop of Medieval and Renaissance buildings coupled with the varied beauty of the Tuscan countryside, will offer students a stimulating range of opportunities for landscape and architectural photography. The course will be divided between outdoor field practice and the exploration of several camera format techniques, lenses as well as printing. By studying influential photographers compositional and artistic issues of parallax, distortion and perspective will be addressed and executed through assignments. A personal vision will be nurtured and guided by the instructor for the final project in a series of landscape/naturalistic/architectural visual context.

A DSLR or viewfinder camera with 24+ megapixels (minimum) is required for this course.

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COURSE: FAPDPA225
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

In this foundational open-air painting course, students will explore and familiarize with the pleasures and challenges of painting outdoors. The students will acquire skills in the techniques of Plein Air painting with oil pastels and develop critical skills to evaluate paintings executed in this style. This course will also provide students with an in-depth look at the various materials and products for outdoor painting using wet techniques. Students will be introduced to the history and tradition of this genre; the conceptual in landscape painting will be emphasized with a specific focus on the Italian impressionists also known as the Macchiaioli. Sessions will be held in studio and at different outdoor venues in and around Florence.

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COURSE: FTFDSC315
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This hands-on course will develop the fundamental skills and techniques of sewing and garment construction. Course topics feature the approach to mechanized and manually-processed techniques involved in the creation of simple cotton garments. An understanding of the use of basic patterns, cutting techniques, seams and finishings will allow students to approach simple prototyping projects. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTADSR210
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The fundamental aspects of accessory design allow students to learn drawing and rendering techniques, which illustrate materials and textures for handbags, belts, gloves, shoes, and hats. Starting from sketches and basic technical drawing techniques, students develop skills that enable them to apply diverse drawing methodologies.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CPCRCM360 / HPHTCM360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and La Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been produced and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropolises and developing destinations will be examined.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPBT320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course introduces students to baking and pastry fundamentals through an analysis of the features and functions of the main pastry ingredients. The course starts with a complete overview of eggs, flour, fats, sugar, and dairy products in order to create a basis on which all future courses will develop. Students will approach the basic mixing and cooking methods in order to understand the baking process with all its possible variations. Special emphasis will be placed on short crust pastry, pate choux, enriched dough, and stirred custards. Upon successful completion of the course, students will gain confidence in the production of sponge cake, pound cake, pastry and English cream, and basic short crust dough. Students will be able to describe and produce the main meringues.

Chef uniform (white chef jacket, chef pants, white apron, white chef hat, kitchen safety shoes) required for this course.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPBI325
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course introduces students to the heritage of Italian traditional breads and provides a survey of the suitable flours and their characteristics as well as an introduction to the chemistry of baking and the most common starters. This course offers the opportunity to learn principles and techniques to prepare Italian breads, flat breads and rolls. Emphasis will be placed on the use of traditional fermentation methods, equipment and skills that emphasize flavor, texture and appearance as well as techniques that increase shelf-life. Fresh brewery yeast, biga, and poolish will be used according to the leavening processes of a variety of products. Students will learn the proper techniques for mixing, leavening, shaping and cooking Italian breads and other Italian baked and non-baked classics using dedicated flours and ingredients according to the regional heritage.

Chef uniform (white chef jacket, chef pants, white apron, white chef hat, kitchen safety shoes) required for this course.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTFMRO350 / HPHTRO350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LACRCM390 / LAHSCM390
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course presents the specific structural and phenomenological aspects of the various types of mafia operating in Italy and internationally. Topics analyze contemporary criminal, social, cultural, and political features of mafia-related groups and explore traditional and emerging illegal markets. The course describes main Italian and international law policies and legislations to contrast this type of organized crime and the experiences of leading individuals and groups developing a culture of legality to combat the mafia.

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COURSE: BUAFCF300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course provides an introduction to the theory, methods, and challenges of corporate finance. The main focus is on financing decisions and investment. The following topics are addressed: risk and return, asset markets and market efficiency, valuation, capital structure, capital budgeting, dividend policy, and derivative securities. Some consideration will also be given to financial management issues that multinational firms face, with an emphasis on the effects of currency denomination on financial decisions.

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COURSE: BUEREM305 / BUMKEM305
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross-disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTFCSF360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course addresses the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through lab practice gained by running a real enterprise in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Coursework includes site visits to well-known Italian luxury brands in Florence such as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPFBOM400
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course introduces a fundamental area of study in the hospitality industry. Students will study the concepts and procedures of food and beverage control systems, cost control, operating budgets, and the effective management of food and beverage operations and cycles. Cost calculation, menu planning, storage, receiving, profit and budget forecasting, labor costs, service payment systems, and other topic-specific areas will be covered. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: FWWCWC340 / LSSOWC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyze the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course includes an Italian language component for beginning-level students and field learning activities. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.

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COURSE: FWWCWC345
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyse the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course.

This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centred process.

This course includes an Italian language component for beginning language students + 90 field learning hours.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPFBSM330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

The front of house area of any restaurant should be carefully planned in order to balance ambiance with function. Restaurant seating, wait stations, and waiting areas are just a few of the areas to consider when planning a restaurant dining room. The course focuses on all aspects that characterize the front of the house experience. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the front of the house to properly reflect the restaurant concept and the necessity of planning front of the house spaces for efficiency. Furthermore, the course considers the pivotal role of excellent customer service and the training methods of front of the house staff.

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COURSE: BUMAIM310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management or equivalent.

This course is designed for students interested in international business ventures and partnerships. Management, leadership, human resource management, organizational skills, and strategies will all be analyzed from a cross-cultural business perspective. A major focus is on strategies adapting managerial skills across cultures. Guest lecturers and on-site visits to international business ventures are an integral part of the course.

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COURSE: FWBPBC310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent.

Students will study the history and background of various national and regional desserts starting from a focus on the most important and typical Italian ingredients. Special attention will be paid to a detailed analysis of DOP and IGP products that are traditionally used in Italian pastry and their fundamental role for the identity of Italian cakes and tarts. The course will cover the origin of classical desserts and eventual variations from classical methods. Students will study a variety of doughs, batters, fillings and glazes with an emphasis on a thorough understanding of the techniques and proper skills for the execution of classic Italian desserts.

Chef uniform (white chef jacket, chef pants, white apron, white chef hat, kitchen safety shoes) required for this course.

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COURSE: FWCANC505
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Prerequisites: Three semesters of culinary arts or dietetics/nutrition coursework and Cooking Light: Contemporary Techniques for Health Living, or equivalent.

Starting from the previously acquired knowledge of macro and micro nutrients, this course will provide students with the tools to analyze and develop a wide variety of nutritionally balanced meals on a seasonal basis. Students will learn the fundamentals of metabolism and digestion and apply previously acquired cooking methods in order to preserve nutrients, and the possible applications of a wide variety of ingredients to create satisfying dishes while still respecting nutritional concepts.
Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of special dietary requirements either depending on dietary special needs or ethical choices. Raw foodism, vegetarian and vegan diet as well as the possible alternatives to guarantee a balanced nutrient intake will be thoroughly covered. The course will give students the tools to design meals on a seasonal basis following the principles of healthy cooking. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).

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COURSE: FWWCPF335
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course presents an exploration of food and wine pairing. The topic goes beyond a classic approach to pairing by demystifying the terminology and the methodology of matching wine and food. Whether preparing a meal at home or ordering at a restaurant, students gain an enhanced knowledge of pairing that can create a harmony and synergy between wine and food, which ultimately leads to a sublime connection of the mind, mouth, memories, and experiences. Particular focus will be given to the Italian cultural approach through wine tastings from the major wine areas paired with classic Italian recipes.

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COURSE: FWCAPC506
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts Majors only. The Science of Cooking: An Introduction to Molecular Cuisine, or equivalent.

The course is divided into three phases and explores stimulating applications of contemporary cuisine. Precision cooking and texture development apply the latest scientific discoveries to food production and may require special instruments for the achievement of specific results. This course focuses on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow chefs to development their creativity in order to reach new and sometimes unexpected results.

  • Phase 1, Temperature Application: This phase explores the possible applications in which precise and specific temperatures play a fundamental role. The microbiology as well as the sanitation practices for precision and low temperature cooking will be covered, with a complete overview of contemporary methods, equipment, and procedures used in contemporary kitchens and in food production labs. Special emphasis will be placed on sous-vide cooking through the use of the immersion circulator, applications of liquid nitrogen for different purposes other than freezing, stimulating effects of carbonation on food flavor perception, and the application of frozen food processing with the Pacojet food processor.
  • Phase 2, Gels and Thickening Agents: This phase examines how contemporary chefs and food technologists use ingredients in ways that earlier generations would have never imagined. Topics will analyze the increasing use of ingredients such as thickening and gelling agents in order to create sauces with unexpectedly smooth textures, hot and cold gels, firm coating gels, and methylcellulose gels. With the support of a chemist, specific additives will be evaluated, discussed, and tested.
  • Phase 3, Gases and Air-Based Preparations: This phase focuses on contemporary techniques of texture changes obtained by incorporating specific gases into foods in order to modify familiar textures, improve presentation methods, and serve unusual and contemporary dishes. Items such as foams, froth, and puffed snacks will be analyzed. Students will examine and test diverse types of foams, both hot and cold with different foaming agents from animal and vegetable sources, as well as learn how to produce light foams, thick fine-textured foams, textured snacks, airs, and froths.

This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).

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COURSE: HPFBRM390
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course examines the problems of the financial structures of restaurant management, in parallel with the objectives and techniques of the individual owner. The planning and decision-making tools available to managers in an organization and comparison between single or partnership managements will be discussed. Personnel organization and food preparation plans will be covered. The course is based on a double approach, combining theory and practice: students will be introduced to the basics of restaurant management and will be given the opportunity to discuss their ideas and questions with selected professionals who are successfully running their restaurant businesses in Florence. Extensive site visits to local restaurants be organized. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: FWWEWA340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course introduces students to Italy’s wine culture, tradition, and heritage as well as to the importance of wine within the Italian socio-economic framework and how to read an Italian wine label. The major grape varieties cultivated in Italy will be analysed and an emphasis will be placed on the main wine production techniques in order to understand the winemaking processes for red, white, rosé, Italian sparkling, sweet, and fortified wines. Students will learn the differences among types and styles of wine according to the winemaking choices, developing a critical capability of analysis and classification.

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COURSE: FWWEWW360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course has been designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the main wine producing countries of the Old World as France, Spain, Germany, Austria, Portugal, Hungary, Greece, Slovenia and of course Italy. Students will be guided across Europe to discover the principal wine areas and native grape varieties, with a specific focus on the cultural heritage and winemaking tradition that belong to each country. Course topics include the different appellation systems, soil characteristics, and basics of winemaking process. The course also offers an introduction to wine tasting in order to better understand the original features of the wines from each country.

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COURSE: CPPULM330 / LACWLM330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The first of a two-part series on magazine production, this course gives students a professional magazine production experience as an academic course. Students, under the supervision of faculty members, will curate every phase of production brainstorming, design, writing, photos, editing, layouts, production, and distribution of a professional lifestyle magazine produced by the institution. The magazine and its semiannual format will represent the student’s approach to living in Florence and topics such as the arts, gastronomy, travel, style, city scenes, etc. from a cutting edge perspective that seeks to challenge and go beyond the surface of a city. Course projects and activities will interact with the journalism activities of Blending, the magazine of FUA’s campus press Ingorda. This project requires additional hours outside of regularly scheduled class times. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: LAPLBE320 / LSHHBE320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course examines the ethics of medical practices and issues in contemporary society. Coursework will pose questions regarding areas that affect human life and death. Topics include practices such as euthanasia, birth control and abortion, cloning, genetic engineering, and biomedical research. Students will analyze the ethical nature of covered practices, how they affect humans on individual and social scales, and the relationship between patients and physicians and medical structures in terms of information, consent, and responsibility. Case studies from local European as well as non-European countries will be closely considered for discussion and study.

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COURSE: LAPYAD290 / LSHHAD290
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course examines the practice and basic principles of addiction to drugs of abuse such as heroin, alcohol, tobacco, cannabis or cocaine. Course topics will cover the epidemiology of drug abuse, the experimental models used in brain research, and the pathological consequences of drug addiction (including heavy drinking and smoking). The course will extend the concept of addiction to pathological behaviors such as compulsive consumption of palatable food, physical exercise dependence, compulsive shopping, sexual hyperactivity, internet abuse, and gambling. The neurochemical mechanisms that are shared and lead from reward to positive reinforcement, loss of control, and dependence will be examined. The symptomatological and neurochemical similarities and differences between drug and behavioral addiction will be addressed, along with the self-destructive behaviors, tolerance, craving, and withdrawal symptoms that both types of dependence produce.

The course traces also the basic aspects of human biology and physiology that are needed to fully comprehend the topics at hand, including the neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters that are altered by both natural and artificial rewards. Students will also learn how to analyze scientific data and correctly interpret the information that is published in peer-reviewed international scientific journals. Finally, students will gain an understanding of the social and ethical implications of drug and behavioral addiction and of the peculiar features of this problem in different countries, with an emphasis on the European and Italian approach as compared with other areas of the world.

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COURSE: FWFCFJ300 / GSANFJ300 / LSESFJ300 / LSSOFJ300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Where does our food come from? How is it grown? What is actually in the food we eat? These are all important questions that we don’t always want to know the answer to. Food justice is a social movement that examines the ethics of food production and food distribution, access to food, and the policies that are often a silent ingredient in our meals. Organic foods, farming, labor wages and practices, food supply distribution and waste, and sustainability are among the themes to be examined in this course. How food systems impact the health and well-being of individuals and communities, political policies and their role in food distribution in developed and developing countries, and the consequences of globalization on food ethics will be addressed through hands-on workshops, visits, and in-class discussions. A special emphasis will be placed on the cultural aspects of food supplies, the Italian traditions of food production and consumption, and the darker roles represented by food in organized crime and immigration.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits.

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COURSE: FWCACC350 / FWFCCC350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as social creatures. Italy represents a unique case for now food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

This class includes food labs, food tours, and one aperitivo project per session. Uniform required for food labs, rental available upon arrival.

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COURSE: FWFCFC340 / LSSOFC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as “made in Italy” culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism, and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and/or tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits.

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COURSE: FWCAHW345 / FWFCHW345
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, 4, A, B

Italy represents longstanding traditions of food culture, wellness, and nutrition through health-oriented practices. Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach health through the lens of food principles. Nutritional facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced a global awareness of a healthy lifestyle. Italy’s approach to seasonality and nutritional balance is characterized by an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle through cultural understanding and integration with the local community. Particular emphasis will be placed, through discussions and direct practice, on seasonality and nutritional principles, whole foods, and freshness, traditional customs, and contemporary innovation. Course topics will also reference the aphorism of “We are what we eat” and how it aligns with the Italian culinary tradition and culture. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social and cultural implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site cultural activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles in Tuscany and Italy. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Three days of food labs, one day of walking tour. Uniform required for food labs, rental available upon arrival.

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COURSE: FWFCNW220
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The best way to get to know a city is to explore it by foot, wander its streets, gain confidence with its social life and surroundings, breathe in every corner of it, and be captured by the unique views, perfumes, and, especially in Italy, the food. Jean Brunhes wrote “To eat is to incorporate a territory” mainly because food, its ingredients, and the rituals connected to it, have represented the mirror of society since ancient times.

This course offers a unique opportunity to immerse oneself into Florentine gastronomy and cultural background through neighborhood walks and tastings, using the city as one of most beautiful classrooms. Walking will give students the opportunity to see things that they otherwise would never see and to taste what’s hidden in between the tourist food attractions. Going by foot means to stumble across areas of the city that are not always intended for tourists, maybe less fancy or famous, perhaps calmer and more beautiful, possibly with the best food ever tasted, along with neighborhood stories and curiosities to be discovered in tiny galleries or in hidden food and wine shops. Florence and its treasures are ready to be unveiled.

Classes include tastings in gelaterie, gastronomie, enoteche, visits to food-related city spots, and suggestive walks in the secret Florence. The course is intended to provide academic knowledge through guided field learning activities that include research, on-site involvement, and topic assessment for each food and wine themed walk in Florence. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material.

Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students’ academic and personal enrichment.

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COURSE: FWFCTW300 / HCGHTW300 / LAPYTW300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

The garden is a space traditionally associated with food cultivation and recreational activity, both are known to have an influence on wellbeing. This course explores a culture of wellness based on the fundamentals of horticulture therapy and the use plants and green spaces, as well as horticultural and culinary activities to promote wellbeing. Students will explore the traditions related to garden activities to foster cognitive, social, emotional, and physical wellbeing for individuals and specific groups (i.e. the elderly, children, individuals with special needs) in a variety of settings. Adapting horticultural therapy in diverse site conditions from sowing to cultivation and the preparation of food products from the garden harvest will be a focus of this course. Course topics will include principles of horticulture, soils and soil cultivation, plant propagation, and harvesting, and the therapeutic potential of farm to table practices. Students will experience first-hand the restorative powers of green spaces through garden management and cooking labs to examine the benefits of the natural environment as a fundamental outcome of this course. This course includes an Experiential Learning Project with CEMI.

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COURSE: FWDNIN305
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The continuous growth of nutritional awareness worldwide has brought nutrition to be one of the fundamental subjects in constant evolution during the last decades. This course provides students with basic nutrition concepts and focuses on the overview of the requirements and functions of protein, carbohydrates, lipids and the major vitamins and minerals that are determinants of health and diseases in human populations. Emphasis will be placed on the role of nutrition in growth and health through the life cycle and the role of diet in the development of chronic diseases and the maintenance of a good health status thanks to a balanced food consumption. The course offers an overview of food policies, food education and an analysis of nowadays eating habits. Students will also learn the guidelines for the balancing of a vegetarian diet and understand how to read a food pyramid.

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COURSE: FWDNLN160 / GSHSLN160 / LSHHLN160 / SHSSLN160
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.

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COURSE: FWCANC505
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Prerequisites: Three semesters of culinary arts or dietetics/nutrition coursework and Cooking Light: Contemporary Techniques for Health Living, or equivalent.

Starting from the previously acquired knowledge of macro and micro nutrients, this course will provide students with the tools to analyze and develop a wide variety of nutritionally balanced meals on a seasonal basis. Students will learn the fundamentals of metabolism and digestion and apply previously acquired cooking methods in order to preserve nutrients, and the possible applications of a wide variety of ingredients to create satisfying dishes while still respecting nutritional concepts.
Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of special dietary requirements either depending on dietary special needs or ethical choices. Raw foodism, vegetarian and vegan diet as well as the possible alternatives to guarantee a balanced nutrient intake will be thoroughly covered. The course will give students the tools to design meals on a seasonal basis following the principles of healthy cooking. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).

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COURSE: FWFCFF347
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, 4, A, B

The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and cultural scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities; encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence’s thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits. This is a Food and Culture course, not a CA/BP lab course. Food labs emphasize the food culture of Italy and are not based on professional cooking techniques.

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COURSE: FWFCSF300 / HPFBSF300 / LSESSF300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Considering the renewed global interest in local sourcing and the growth of Km0 practices (locally produced), the study of sustainable food systems is an essential component in the education of an ethically-minded food industry learner. The course takes its cue from the Italian example based on regionalism and the table as an expression of local territories, and how these factors have influenced the national food industry. It analyzes the industry and the production of food (fish, meat, dairy, fruit, vegetables, and grains) and focuses on packaging, traceability (labels), and distribution while exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed, as well as case studies in Italian food and beverage service and retailing. A strong focus is placed on seasonality, food policies, and food education. The course objective is to provide students with a solid conceptual framework in order to analyze the Italian food industry and the food production system from a sustainable perspective. Through the understanding of the broader concept of sustainability, students will be able to explore the social, economic, and environmental implications of food production and consumption and to identify the global threats in terms of public health. Students will develop critical skills by analyzing sustainability as active citizens, consumers, and entrepreneurs. The analysis and rethinking of economic, social, and agricultural alternatives in the current food production system will also be developed. Lectures will be complemented by visits, food tours, tastings, and cooking labs.

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COURSE: GSANWA300 / GSHSWA300 / GSUSWA300 / LAPLWA300 / SHSSWA300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational – as well as physical – experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of “wanderlust” will also be analyzed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.

The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students’ academic and personal enrichment.

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COURSE: IDRHAA355 / LAAHAA355
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, A

This course explores the principal architects and artists, monuments, and themes from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italian art and architecture. Class time is divided equally between lectures and on-site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be placed on Renaissance architecture in Florence and will also include architectural developments in other Italian towns. Special topics will include architectural theory, the Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. Coursework will focus on important figures such as Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Michelangelo, and Leonardo, in addition to visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence.

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COURSE: LAPLBE320 / LSHHBE320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course examines the ethics of medical practices and issues in contemporary society. Coursework will pose questions regarding areas that affect human life and death. Topics include practices such as euthanasia, birth control and abortion, cloning, genetic engineering, and biomedical research. Students will analyze the ethical nature of covered practices, how they affect humans on individual and social scales, and the relationship between patients and physicians and medical structures in terms of information, consent, and responsibility. Case studies from local European as well as non-European countries will be closely considered for discussion and study.

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COURSE: LAAHCI360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Prerequisites: Introduction to Art History or equivalent.

The course explores the works of artists who, over the last 50 years, have made today’s art and constructed the relationship between artists and the city of Florence in the Italian context. Emphasis is placed on comparing the panorama of traditional, historic Florence and Italy to international contemporary art. The course will involve lectures (a survey of art in Tuscany and Italy, including abstract experiences, Italian pop art, minimal art, Poesia visiva, Trans-avant-gardism and the present-day tendencies of figurative art) and fact-finding visits to artist ateliers where course participants are encouraged to ask questions, i.e. which factors led artists towards certain decisions, which cultural forces led artists to adopt certain forms, etc. The course alternates between fieldwork for visiting galleries and ateliers and carrying out interpretative analyses of the fieldwork in the classroom. The course encourages contact with the living tissue of art. The Florentine creative scene, vibrant but rooted in history, is varied and complex; this course gives the student the opportunity to establish direct, informed contact with it.

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COURSE: FAPDFS225
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course is designed to take full advantage of the student’s unique experiences living and studying in the city of Florence. With on-site inspiration channeled into artistic creativity, students will draw on location at sites of historical significance and visual interest, ranging from architectural masterpieces, landscape vistas, and medieval streets to formal gardens, street markets, and Renaissance fountains. Slide lectures will document the rich history of how Florence and its environs have attracted and inspired visiting artists over the centuries. Students will develop individual sketchbooks with the aim of building up source material for future projects.

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COURSE: GSUSFW280 / LAAHFW280 / LAHSFW280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course examines the city of Florence with themed walks offering a comprehensive approach to the city as an open-air cultural, historical, and artistic research site from its Roman foundation to its contemporary Zeitgeist. Students will learn the history of the city through its art: they will understand how buildings, streets, squares, and monuments can be mapped as living traces of multiple, overlapping layers of a complex past, and how to encode them in their personal appropriation of the city. Starting from learning how to decode the artistic environment of the city and to unveil its traces – both visible and invisible – the course aims at understanding the main social and cultural reasons underlying the existing shape of the city.

The course explores traces and evidences from Roman times through Middle Ages, Renaissance, Mannerism and Baroque, up to Art Nouveau and contemporary Florence. Students will be provided with a consistent theoretical background related to relevant historic-artistic landmarks and their social and cultural context and main characters (Guelphs vs. Ghibellines, the Florentine Guilds, Dante, the Medici family, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Ghirlandaio, Ammannati, Pontormo, etc.). Students will be encouraged to develop their own experiential tools and strategies to approach the city through guided field learning activities that assess research, on-site involvement, and academic outcome for each themed walk in Florence.

The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students’ academic and personal enrichment.

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COURSE: HCGHGG201 / ISISGG201 / ISITGG201 / LSESGG201 / LSSOGG201
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course offers an innovative way to learn the Italian language and develop environmental consciousness while exploring Florence and its surroundings. Through the study of the relationship between humans and nature, the human role in ecology, and the sustainable management and conservation of natural resources, students will learn basic Italian vocabulary and usage in the form of experiential learning.

The course aims to develop four basic Italian language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking), while providing experiences and on-site lessons aimed at expanding the connection between individuals and the natural world and developing sustainable lifestyles. Each topic, excursion, and experience will be supported by a structured class of Italian language, providing a great opportunity to explore Florence, its parks, its people, and its traditions from a new perspective while learning and practicing the Italian language.

This course includes an Italian language component for beginning-level students. SLC (Studies with a Language Component) represents an engaging approach to learning that embraces a multi-disciplinary application of cultural education methods. This stimulating approach broadens students’ understanding of their studies and creates a link between their academic careers and the local cultural environment which surrounds them. Through SLC courses, students learn notions of Italian language and terminology as a bridge to better understand and appreciate Italy’s modern, multifaceted society. By being exposed to the Italian language, Students discover different elements of Italian communication and culture and learn the linguistic fundamentals that enable them to engage in simple, everyday conversation. While doing so, they examine the sociological and pedagogical aspects of Italy such as society, politics, education, family, geography, and the environment. SLC is a learning methodology that integrates theory with practice: students learn the culture and language of Italy in class, then experience what they have learned through interaction with the local communities within the city of Florence and its neighborhoods. Diverse student populations benefit from this educational approach.

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COURSE: LAHSIR330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course explores the meaning of the term “Renaissance” when applied to the period of Italian history from circa 1350 to 1550. The subject will be approached from a variety of standpoints: social, political, economic, intellectual, scientific, and artistic. The focus will be on the concept of Italian Renaissance Humanism and on the relationship between art and society during this period. Lectures will be supplemented by a number of visits to key historical sites in Florence. Field activities and museum visits are an integral part of the course.

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COURSE: LACMHM380 / LAHSHM380
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course discusses the origins and development of the Mafia in the context of Italian politics, economics, and society from the nineteenth century to the present day. It analyzes the nature of Mafia activities and their international relevance. Special focus will be given to judicial procedures against the Mafia and the experiences of key individuals and groups contrasting their illegal activities.

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COURSE: ISITIB101
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, 4, A, B

This course develops basic conversation, reading, and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary, and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to express themselves in basic sentences, recognize gender and number in both nouns and adjectives, and begin approaching the Passato Prossimo. Emphasis will be given to the oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. This level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before.

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COURSE: ISITIB165
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This intensive six-credit course is intended for students with no prior knowledge of Italian. It will give students the opportunity to experience a total language immersion, learning how to use gradually more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Upon course conclusion, students will be able to communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background, and understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. The course will start from linguistic fundamentals and essential grammatical structures, including singular and plural forms of articles, adjectives, nouns, and their agreement; regular and some irregular conjugations of -are, -ere, -ire verbs in the Present tense; and simple prepositions. It will then move on to reflexive verbs, conjugation of regular and irregular verbs in the Past, and direct object pronouns. It will finally introduce students to Future and Conditional tenses, possessive adjectives, and indirect object pronouns, along with the continued practice of expanding vocabulary and gradual building of complexity in grammatical structures. All lessons will be taught in Italian.

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COURSE: LAAHAH210
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This introductory art history course will take students through Italian and European art from the classical Greek and Roman periods up to and including the eighteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to Florentine and Italian art of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries and to the “Golden Age” of the Renaissance. The course is aimed at students who have not taken a history of western art course before. Lectures will alternate with on-site teaching in Florence including architectural walking tours and visits to relevant museums, churches, and palaces.

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COURSE: ISITII201
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 2, 4, A, B

Pre-requisites: One semester of Italian language or equivalent.

This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginning-level course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading and writing. Upon course completion, students will be able to express polite requests using the Present Conditional and develop their language ability by using direct and indirect object pronouns. This course is aimed at students who already have a basic vocabulary of Italian and some knowledge of elementary language structures.

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COURSE: IDRHAR340 / LAAHAR340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course explores the principal architects, monuments and themes of fifteenth and sixteenth century Italian architecture. The course includes site visits in the city of Florence. Emphasis will be on Renaissance architecture in Florence, but will also include architectural developments in Rome, Urbino, Mantua, Verona and Vicenza. Special topics will include: architectural theory, Medici and papal patronage, urban planning, and church and palace design. A special focus will be dedicated to architects: Brunelleschi, Alberti, Michelozzo, Giuliano Sangallo, Bramante, Antonio Sangallo the Younger, Michelangelo, Giulio Romano and Palladio. Visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence are included.

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COURSE: FWFCLV260 / HCGHLV260 / LAAHLV260 / LAHSLV260 / LAPLLV260
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A

The genius of Leonardo Da Vinci is boundless and this course introduces students to his universal genius through an overview of his life, art, and his remarkable approach to the exploration of nature. Centuries before the scientific method of investigation became a standard for philosophers and scientists, Leonardo had already developed the essential characteristics that are still a part of the methodology today. Yet, his experiential and interdisciplinary approach to the world around him is still a mystery that continues to inspire current generations with the challenge to unveil the layers of his creative powers. In this course, students will have the opportunity to investigate Leonardo’s intellectual evolution, his interest in botanical studies, and his quest to discover the secrets of nature that allowed him to become a master and inspiration of Renaissance art. Leonardo’s unique path will be analyzed through a focus on his youth in Florence, his artistic career in Milan and France and the legacy of his masters, with investigation of his anatomical dissections and the inventions of extraordinary machines, as well as his approach to the mysteries of alchemy and some of his lesser-known interests. Not everybody knows that Leonardo’s genius also involved the study of table manners, the creation of kitchen utensils, and the planning of pioneering kitchen devices that will also be experimented in this course. Discussions on Leonardo’s various studies and their outcomes, guided visits in locations related to his artistic and scientific vocation, field learning activities, and a series of practical workshops on recipes written and inspired by Leonardo’s eclecticism will provide the tools to construct a comprehensive understanding of the man behind the genius. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: HCGHFY320 / IDRHFY320 / LAAHFY320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course spans the history of Italian gardens from the 1200s to the 1700s. The course explores the evolution of the Italian garden landscape starting from the ancient Roman roots and the emergence of herbal gardens in medieval monasteries for medicinal remedies to the flourishing of early Renaissance masterpieces in the great palaces and villas of Italy. The early transformation of the garden from functional to recreational purposes will be examined in religious and humanistic contexts. A second phase of evolution from the recreation to symbols of power will be introduced through the gardens of ruling families and religious figures who combined garden aesthetics with experimentation and horticultural innovation until the late Renaissance. The course will conclude with the waning of the Italian garden in the 18th century, which ceded the domination of Italian gardens to the landscaping practices of France.

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COURSE: GSHSAY190 / LARSAY190 / SHPPAY190 / SHSSAY190
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course provides students with an introduction to the art of yoga and meditation to gain an understanding of the philosophical and spiritual contexts that the discipline is rooted in. The course investigation begins with the notion of awareness, and the acquisition of the term through an overview of the principal asanas and their correct practice. The spiritual aspects of yoga are experienced in the form of various meditation techniques from different philosophies as well as the study of pranayama breathing exercises. Topics also include an examination of yoga props as well as dietary and nutritional guidelines, studied through the lens of yoga philosophy gleaned from sacred texts. The course will cover yoga traditions from ancient times to more contemporary interpretations.

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COURSE: GSANWA300 / GSHSWA300 / GSUSWA300 / LAPLWA300 / SHSSWA300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational – as well as physical – experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of “wanderlust” will also be analyzed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.

The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students’ academic and personal enrichment.

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COURSE: LARSWR300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This is an introductory comparative study of the world’s major religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and the religions of China and Japan. The course will examine a significant number of specific themes in all religions studied: the nature of this world and universe, the relationship between the individual and the transcendent, ultimate reality, the meaning and goals of worldly life, the importance of worship and rituals, the importance of devotion to the master or guru, ethics, and human action. Excerpts from important texts of each tradition will be analyzed.

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COURSE: CPCRCM360 / HPHTCM360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and La Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been produced and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropolises and developing destinations will be examined.

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COURSE: LACRCM390 / LAHSCM390
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course presents the specific structural and phenomenological aspects of the various types of mafia operating in Italy and internationally. Topics analyze contemporary criminal, social, cultural, and political features of mafia-related groups and explore traditional and emerging illegal markets. The course describes main Italian and international law policies and legislations to contrast this type of organized crime and the experiences of leading individuals and groups developing a culture of legality to combat the mafia.

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COURSE: GSANCI202 / ISISCI202 / LAAHCI202 / LSSOCI202
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, 4, A, B

The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one’s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills.

This course includes an Italian language component for beginning-level students.

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COURSE: LAPYAD290 / LSHHAD290
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course examines the practice and basic principles of addiction to drugs of abuse such as heroin, alcohol, tobacco, cannabis or cocaine. Course topics will cover the epidemiology of drug abuse, the experimental models used in brain research, and the pathological consequences of drug addiction (including heavy drinking and smoking). The course will extend the concept of addiction to pathological behaviors such as compulsive consumption of palatable food, physical exercise dependence, compulsive shopping, sexual hyperactivity, internet abuse, and gambling. The neurochemical mechanisms that are shared and lead from reward to positive reinforcement, loss of control, and dependence will be examined. The symptomatological and neurochemical similarities and differences between drug and behavioral addiction will be addressed, along with the self-destructive behaviors, tolerance, craving, and withdrawal symptoms that both types of dependence produce.

The course traces also the basic aspects of human biology and physiology that are needed to fully comprehend the topics at hand, including the neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters that are altered by both natural and artificial rewards. Students will also learn how to analyze scientific data and correctly interpret the information that is published in peer-reviewed international scientific journals. Finally, students will gain an understanding of the social and ethical implications of drug and behavioral addiction and of the peculiar features of this problem in different countries, with an emphasis on the European and Italian approach as compared with other areas of the world.

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COURSE: FWFCFJ300 / GSANFJ300 / LSESFJ300 / LSSOFJ300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Where does our food come from? How is it grown? What is actually in the food we eat? These are all important questions that we don’t always want to know the answer to. Food justice is a social movement that examines the ethics of food production and food distribution, access to food, and the policies that are often a silent ingredient in our meals. Organic foods, farming, labor wages and practices, food supply distribution and waste, and sustainability are among the themes to be examined in this course. How food systems impact the health and well-being of individuals and communities, political policies and their role in food distribution in developed and developing countries, and the consequences of globalization on food ethics will be addressed through hands-on workshops, visits, and in-class discussions. A special emphasis will be placed on the cultural aspects of food supplies, the Italian traditions of food production and consumption, and the darker roles represented by food in organized crime and immigration.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits.

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COURSE: FWCACC350 / FWFCCC350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as social creatures. Italy represents a unique case for now food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

This class includes food labs, food tours, and one aperitivo project per session. Uniform required for food labs, rental available upon arrival.

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COURSE: FWFCFC340 / LSSOFC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as “made in Italy” culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism, and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and/or tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits.

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COURSE: FWWCWC340 / LSSOWC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyze the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course includes an Italian language component for beginning-level students and field learning activities. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.

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COURSE: FWWCWC345
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyse the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course.

This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centred process.

This course includes an Italian language component for beginning language students + 90 field learning hours.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCNW220
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The best way to get to know a city is to explore it by foot, wander its streets, gain confidence with its social life and surroundings, breathe in every corner of it, and be captured by the unique views, perfumes, and, especially in Italy, the food. Jean Brunhes wrote “To eat is to incorporate a territory” mainly because food, its ingredients, and the rituals connected to it, have represented the mirror of society since ancient times.

This course offers a unique opportunity to immerse oneself into Florentine gastronomy and cultural background through neighborhood walks and tastings, using the city as one of most beautiful classrooms. Walking will give students the opportunity to see things that they otherwise would never see and to taste what’s hidden in between the tourist food attractions. Going by foot means to stumble across areas of the city that are not always intended for tourists, maybe less fancy or famous, perhaps calmer and more beautiful, possibly with the best food ever tasted, along with neighborhood stories and curiosities to be discovered in tiny galleries or in hidden food and wine shops. Florence and its treasures are ready to be unveiled.

Classes include tastings in gelaterie, gastronomie, enoteche, visits to food-related city spots, and suggestive walks in the secret Florence. The course is intended to provide academic knowledge through guided field learning activities that include research, on-site involvement, and topic assessment for each food and wine themed walk in Florence. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material.

Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students’ academic and personal enrichment.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LACMHM380 / LAHSHM380
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course discusses the origins and development of the Mafia in the context of Italian politics, economics, and society from the nineteenth century to the present day. It analyzes the nature of Mafia activities and their international relevance. Special focus will be given to judicial procedures against the Mafia and the experiences of key individuals and groups contrasting their illegal activities.

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COURSE: FWFCFF347
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, 4, A, B

The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and cultural scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities; encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence’s thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits. This is a Food and Culture course, not a CA/BP lab course. Food labs emphasize the food culture of Italy and are not based on professional cooking techniques.

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COURSE: FWWEWA340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course introduces students to Italy’s wine culture, tradition, and heritage as well as to the importance of wine within the Italian socio-economic framework and how to read an Italian wine label. The major grape varieties cultivated in Italy will be analysed and an emphasis will be placed on the main wine production techniques in order to understand the winemaking processes for red, white, rosé, Italian sparkling, sweet, and fortified wines. Students will learn the differences among types and styles of wine according to the winemaking choices, developing a critical capability of analysis and classification.

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COURSE: FWFCSF300 / HPFBSF300 / LSESSF300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Considering the renewed global interest in local sourcing and the growth of Km0 practices (locally produced), the study of sustainable food systems is an essential component in the education of an ethically-minded food industry learner. The course takes its cue from the Italian example based on regionalism and the table as an expression of local territories, and how these factors have influenced the national food industry. It analyzes the industry and the production of food (fish, meat, dairy, fruit, vegetables, and grains) and focuses on packaging, traceability (labels), and distribution while exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed, as well as case studies in Italian food and beverage service and retailing. A strong focus is placed on seasonality, food policies, and food education. The course objective is to provide students with a solid conceptual framework in order to analyze the Italian food industry and the food production system from a sustainable perspective. Through the understanding of the broader concept of sustainability, students will be able to explore the social, economic, and environmental implications of food production and consumption and to identify the global threats in terms of public health. Students will develop critical skills by analyzing sustainability as active citizens, consumers, and entrepreneurs. The analysis and rethinking of economic, social, and agricultural alternatives in the current food production system will also be developed. Lectures will be complemented by visits, food tours, tastings, and cooking labs.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus

COVID Safe Travel

The health and safety of our students is our highest priority. We take our duty of care for our students, their families and our Australian University partners seriously. For all of our program locations, we have developed a site-specific COVID-19 risk matrix and risk management and emergency response plans so that health and safety response protocols are monitored, managed and communicated.

We have also developed a flexible COVID-19 Refund Policy that limits the financial impact on students should CISaustralia (or one of our overseas partners) have to cancel or suspend a program due to COVID-19.

In preparation for your overseas program, it’s important that you carefully read and understand information related to COVID-19 Travel Safety and Insurance Requirements.

CISaustralia monitors Smartraveller and reliable news feeds to keep up to date with the latest COVID information and any associated travel restrictions and entry requirements for all destinations where we have programs. Due to the constantly evolving COVID-19 situation, Government travel advice can change quickly. For the most up to date information on Italy, visit the Smartraveller website.

Excursions

Included in the program is a Farewell Aperitivo with your Site Director, which includes two beverages and finger foods. During your program you will also have the opportunity to discover some of Italy’s most spectacular cities and attractions. Below are a few of the many places you might like to visit and activities to undertake during your free time (at own expense) in Florence:

  • The Duomo, Florence’s famous cathedral dome, dominates the skyline of Florence
  • Uffizi Gallery houses some of the most important works of the Renaissance
  • The Accademia houses Michelangelo’s David, one of the most famous sculptures in the world
  • The Ponte Vecchio (Old Bridge) connects the Uffizi to Palazzo Pitti
  • Santa Maria Novella Church, Tuscany’s most important Gothic church
  • Piazza della Signoria, the Political Heart of Florence

The CISaustralia Site Director in Florence can also provide participants with any assistance or advice regarding local cultural and tourist activities.

Location

This medium-sized city is perfect for the July in Florence program. It won’t take you more than a few days to learn your way around but with so much to do, your time will go quickly. Make sure to check out the historic city centre, outlying towns and the beautiful snow capped Apennine Mountains.

Florence is the capital of the charming Tuscan region in Italy and has a population of around 400,000 people. Although a famous tourist destination, Florentines (locals) know where to find the best osterias (restaurants), boutiques and stores which are often hidden away from the tourist crowds.

Geographically, Italy is located in south central Europe, close to neighbouring countries such as France, Greece and Spain – it’s a traveller’s delight. Italy is shaped like a high-heeled boot kicking a triangle, which is the island of Sicily.

Italy borders France, Austria and Switzerland to the north and also borders Slovenia along the Alps. The islands of Sicily and Sardinia also form part of the country.

The University

Your July in Florence program will be hosted at the Florence University of the Arts (FUA).

The University is located in the heart of this magic city so you will have easy, walking accessibility to some of the country’s most famous tourist attractions. The Ponte Vecchio and the Basilica of Santa Croce are just minutes from the campus!

Unique to the CISaustralia program are small class sizes, ensuring you receive dedicated attention from your teacher. Your lecturers will come from Italy and across Europe, and class sizes range from 8-25 students and are taught in English (except for your Italian language course!).

The University campus has a fully functioning restaurant that is completely managed, catered, and run by FUA students. This is a unique aspect of the campus and allows you to enjoy this social, cultural experience firsthand.

During your time in Florence, you will become a part of the community, living in your own Florentine apartment and enjoying the many restaurants, cafés and bars throughout this famous city!

Culture in Italy is extremely connected to the food. Italians are known for their wood fired pizzas, olive oil and crusty bread, fresh pasta and desserts. You will certainly never be hungry in this country!

Start packing, because you’re about to embark on the adventure of a lifetime in this thriving and distinctly charming Italian city.

Accommodation

This program in Florence provides you with a fully-furnished apartment, shared with 4-6 other students from around the world. Bedrooms are single-sex shared, with between 2-4 students per room. All apartments are within a 20-minute walk from FUA facilities/campuses.

All apartments offer spacious living areas and are fully furnished with:

  • Bed linen, pillows, towel
  • Fridge, oven, stove
  • Basic cookware and utensils
  • Washing machine
  • TV
  • Internet access/Wifi

The apartments are self-catered, meaning you will need to prepare your own meals – a fun time to share cuisine, a fine wine and stories from around the world, or laugh about your day in Florence. The apartments are located within walking distance to some of Florence’s best markets, stores, restaurants and museums. Take advantage of the local restaurants nearby or buy your own food at the markets and cook at home.

Bedrooms are shared between at least two students, and some bedrooms may be shared between three or more students. You may request a single bedroom for an extra fee, subject to availability.

The apartments are older-style housing, so they do not have air-conditioning or clothes dryers. Please be aware that the apartment buildings also house non-students and as such, there is a very strict noise policy. Overnight guests are not permitted in your accommodation.

Program Fee & Dates

Session 1: May-June 2022 (3 weeks)
Application Deadline30 March 2022
Arrival Date15 May 2022
Departure Date03 June 2022
Application FeeA$ 95
Program Fee A$ 6,599 - 8,999
OS-HELP A$ 7,100
Session 2: June 2022 (3 weeks)
Application Deadline20 April 2022
Arrival Date05 June 2022
Departure Date24 June 2022
Application FeeA$ 95
Program Fee A$ 6,599 - 8,999
OS-HELP A$ 7,100
Session 3: June-July 2022 (3 weeks)
Application Deadline11 May 2022
Arrival Date26 June 2022
Departure Date15 July 2022
Application FeeA$ 95
Program Fee A$ 6,599 - 8,999
OS-HELP A$ 7,100
Session 4: July-August 2022 (3 weeks)
Application Deadline11 May 2022
Arrival Date17 July 2022
Departure Date05 August 2022
Application FeeA$ 95
Program Fee A$ 6,599 - 8,999
OS-HELP A$ 7,100
Session A: May-June 2022 (6 weeks)
Application Deadline30 March 2022
Arrival Date15 May 2022
Departure Date24 June 2022
Application FeeA$ 95
Program Fee A$ 7,999 - 10,499
OS-HELP A$ 7,100
Session B: June-August 2022 (6 weeks)
Application Deadline11 May 2022
Arrival Date26 June 2022
Departure Date05 August 2022
Application FeeA$ 95
Program Fee A$ 7,999 - 10,499
OS-HELP A$ 7,100

 

Program fees include the following:
  • CISaustralia support services before, during and after the program
  • Academic advising
  • Financial advice
  • Assistance with travel arrangements
  • Pre-departure guide and session
  • Airport pick-up (on specified program arrival date within designated arrival times)
  • Shared apartment accommodation (additional fee for a single room*)
  • 10 meal plan units per week**
  • Tuition fees
  • FUA application fee, student service fee, library fee
  • Free use of gym and gym classes
  • FUA Educational Field Trip (EFT) included with some courses, but not all
  • Farewell Aperitivo with your Site Director
  • Program risk matrix and COVID-19 risk assessment
  • Risk Management and Emergency Response Plan
  • CISaustralia 24/7 on-site support – Site Director
  • Florence University of the Arts transcript
  • University of South Florida official transcript***
  • CISaustralia Certificate of Participation (available on request)

Please note: Some courses may have an additional ‘materials fee’ payable on arrival. Specific course material fees are usually between $50 and $100.

*Housing is limited and we cannot guarantee a single room. If we are unable to assign you to a single room, we will refund you the additional fee paid.

**10 meal plan units per week equates to approximately 5-10 meals per week at one of FUA’s eateries, e.g. 1 plate of pasta (dinner) = 2 units, 1 snack (lunch) = 1 unit

***University of South Florida will also provide an official transcript as the School of Record (SOR). SOR: A U.S. accredited institution of higher education that officially documents and awards credits for programs or institutions that are not accredited in the U.S., verifying appropriately all elements necessary for such official documentation.

What is not included:

Dates are for reference only and are subject to change. Please do not book flights until you have received the confirmed dates in your acceptance paperwork.

CISaustralia reserves the right to alter fees at any time due to currency fluctuations and/or fee changes made by our partner universities.

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