January in Dunedin, New Zealand

 

Spend 6.5 weeks on the South Island, in the beautiful and historic university city of Dunedin. Choose from a wide range of courses in the areas of Business, Health, Humanities and Sciences. Whether you prefer creative arts or pristine wilderness, you’ll feel right at home on this program.

Program Overview

During your January in New Zealand program you will be a student at the University of Otago – one of the country’s oldest universities in the cultural capital of New Zealand’s South Island, Dunedin.

Your New Home – Within walking distance to beautiful beaches, bush-clad hills and tidal inlets, we just know you’re going to love your new home in Dunedin.

World-renowned University – The University of Otago is highly regarded for the quality of research produced by its students and recognised internationally for advancements in higher education. Courses are available in business, economics, geography, art history, modern languages, Maori studies, science and more.

The Great Outdoors – Hiking, skiing, water sports and bungee jumping are just some of what Dunedin has for you. It is a perfect gateway to Central Otago and Fiordland allowing you to explore the coastal location while enjoying a climate ideal for a wide range of sports and recreational activities.

Events – You may have the opportunity to attend the Dunedin Summer Festival, the New Zealand Masters Games and numerous cricket games during your stay.

The Cosmopolitan City – Due to historical, cultural and geographical reasons Dunedin is one of New Zealand’s major urban centres. With numerous shopping districts, eateries and plenty of nightlife you’ll always find something to keep you occupied.

Highlights

Here are just some of the highlights to expect during your January in New Zealand program:

  • Beaches, mountains and wilderness right on your doorstep
  • Located in the heart of Lord of the Rings country
  • Live in a UNESCO-designated ‘Creative City of Literature’
  • Study courses at New Zealand’s oldest university
  • Festivals, sporting events and concerts
  • Diverse student body
  • 6.5-week program with approximate equivalent credit for 1-2 standard courses (10-20 credit points) at your home university in Australia
  • Variety of sporting facilities on campus

Choose Your Course

This program takes place over 6.5 weeks between early-January and mid-February at the University of Otago. The University of Otago is well recognised for its world-class quality of research and teaching. It is one of the few universities in the world where the main activity of its host city, Dunedin, is education.

Course load: 1-2 papers (courses) each equivalent to a full-time academic course in Australia. For most courses on this program, 1 point implies 10 hours of work. Taking one 18-point paper involves 180 hours of work (or 30 hours a week for 6 weeks, including classes and private study time).

  • Depending on your Australian university, “courses” may be referred to as “subjects” or “units”.
  • Each course/subject/unit you undertake on a CISaustralia program is designed to be a full-time, semester course that has been condensed to fit into an intensive, short-term program. As such, for any 1 course you study abroad, you should receive the credit points for 1 full-time course/subject/unit at your Australian university.
  • Many universities work off of a 1-for-1 equivalency (1 course abroad = 1 course in Australia), but ultimately credit approval is the decision of your faculty and Australian university.
  • CISaustralia strongly recommends that you have any overseas courses pre-approved for academic credit before you depart for your program. Some documentation that may be useful are the course outline/syllabus, program overview and the contact hours.
  • It is best to get 4-5 papers (courses) approved before you go to NZ. This gives you some flexibility in setting up your class schedule for the courses you will eventually take – and allows for a possible timetable clash. Think about courses required for your major, but also courses that fulfil your elective requirements.
  • Your CISaustralia Program Advisor can assist with any questions or details your university needs to make a decision.

While it is possible to undertake 2 courses during this program, due to the intense, condensed nature of the courses, it is not recommended. Additionally, due to the frequency of classes to fit condensed material into a shorter timeframe, it can be difficult to find 2 courses that do not having clashing timetables. If you wish to undertake 2 courses, the University of Otago will assess your transcript to ensure grades you have received are reflective of your ability to handle the intense workload.

How to Choose Your Courses: Now the fun part! As part of the application process you will be required to complete a Course Selection Worksheet. The instructions will guide you through the steps of choosing your courses.

Academic Requirement: To qualify for this program, students must be in good academic standing with a GPA of 4.5 (out of 7) or equivalent. If your current GPA falls below the requirement, you may still be considered for the program but will need to be prepared to provide supporting documentation. Please contact us to discuss your situation and we will work with you to help find another suitable program if required.

NOTE: Please be advised that the University of Otago requires a student’s official transcript when considering applicants. Ordering an official transcript from a university can take up to a few weeks. Students applying near or on the program’s application deadline should plan to have their official transcript on hand.

2020 Course Descriptions:

COURSE: MUSI249/349
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite:
MUSI 249: 36 100-level MUSI or PERF points
MUSI 349: 36 200-level MUSI or PERF points

This paper equips singers with scientific knowledge on the voice and demonstrates how to teach safely and effectively. The paper encompasses vocal anatomy and physiology, practical techniques and critical listening.

Assessment
In-class test: 20%
Practical teaching assessments: 40%
Written essay: 40%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HIST230/333
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite:
HIST 230: One 100-level HIST paper or 108 points
HIST 333: 18 200-level HIST or ARTH or ARTV points

This paper examines the extraordinary transformation in family forms in New Zealand from 1830 to today. It asks how and why these changes occurred and considers the role of the law and medicine in shaping these transformations.

Topics considered include the shift from “natural” reproduction to medically-assisted reproduction (“test-tube babies”); childlessness, adoption and whāngai; controlling and enhancing fertility; debates from the dominant Pākehā nuclear family model to same sex and single parent-led families in the 21st century.

Assessment for HIST 230
Assignments (2 × 700 words): 20%
Essay (2,000 words): 30%
Final examination (2 hours): 50%

Assessment for HIST 333
Assignments (2 x 700 words): 20%
Essay (2,500 words): 30%
Oral presentation: 10%
Final examination (2 hours): 40%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FORB201
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 54 points. Open for Interest Only enrolment with Head of Department permission.

Increasingly, forensic investigations have come to rest on the techniques of forensic biology to provide vital evidence in homicides, violent crimes, disaster identification and even minor crimes. This course is designed as an introduction for the student who is interested in analysing biological evidence as it relates to legal and other investigations, or collecting and processing evidence at a crime scene or in a laboratory. Students will have an unequalled opportunity to interact with a range of national and international forensic experts, providing a sense of reality and authority that is unique.

The course provides a strong basis in modern forensic biology techniques. The multidisciplinary nature of forensics depends on the integration of scientific skills within a forensic context, and hence the course includes a wide spectrum of topics.

Assessment
Test: 20%
Assignment: 30%
Final examination (2 hour): 50%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MART308
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 54 200-level points.

An introduction to the practice of integrated digital marketing, including both digital marketing skills and business philosophy, and also a sociological view, including ethical considerations.

This paper is an introduction to integrated digital marketing. The emphasis is placed on digital marketing as a business philosophy, a sociological view of the practice of digital marketing from a consumer viewpoint, consideration of ethical issues, and practical skills and knowledge demanded by employers that will enable graduates to embark on a professional career in the field of marketing.

Assessment
Semester-long project (Mimic Pro simulation): 20%
Online tests (3 x 5%): 15%
Software exercises (3 x 5%): 15%
Final examination: 50%

Students will be unable to pass the course if they do not purchase the required courseware. Available online only and must be purchased, bundled with the online digital marketing software Mimic Pro, currently US$99.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LAWS470
CREDITS: 15 points

Pre-requisites: LAWS 201, 202, 203, 204.

This course will examine the origins and fundamental concepts of international criminal law.

Assessment
Research assignment: 30%
Final examination: 70% or 100%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MANT361
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: MANT 101 or BSNS 111 and 36 200-level Commerce points, or MANT 250.

Examines the essential theories and concepts for conducting human resource management practice in different countries and cultures and with teams from multiple locations.

Assessment
Participation: 10%
Mid-term exam: 30%
Group case presentation: 30%
Final written assignment: 30%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: TOUR214
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 108 points.

This course explores the complex value chain that delivers wine from vineyard to consumer. It provides an introduction to everything from viticulture and winemaking, to the role of intermediaries, wine retail (off-licence) and the hospitality sector (on-licence). Students are also introduced to the role of wine (and wine tourism) in regional development.

The wine industry and wine tourism are becoming increasingly significant aspects of the New Zealand economy. This course provides students with an overview of the diverse nature of the wine business with an emphasis on how wine and tourism intersect. It uses examples from New Zealand and around the world to give you an appreciation of some of the key academic and business concepts behind the wine industry.

A core component is the gaining of skills and knowledge in wine appreciation. Workshops are dedicated to the acquisition of wine tasting skills and to gaining knowledge of a range of wines and aspects of wine marketing from around the world.

A non-compulsory field trip to Central Otago gives students direct exposure to wine making operations and cellar door management. The paper is ideal for those wishing to enter the wine industry, those looking to develop their wine knowledge to use in the business environment, those wishing to learn more about the marketing and sales of symbolic consumer goods, or those with an interest in wine. It is suited to current students and those who wish to return to study.

Assessment
Essay: 20%
Project: 30%
Wine examination: 20%
Final examination (open book): 30%

NOTE: Please be aware that this course has limited places. If you are interested in undertaking this course, CISaustralia recommends that you apply for the program as soon as possible.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FINC204
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 108 points.

Principles and techniques for handling personal financial decisions. This course will equip you with specialised knowledge across diverse areas including investments, risk management, taxation, estate planning, social security and retirement planning.

This paper aims at providing students with the ability to plan, analyse and evaluate alternatives of personal financial decision. The course commences from the roots of financial planning – “life cycle” theory of consumption and savings. We will delve into the matter of income and expenditure over a lifetime. Then we will learn by doing how to construct a comprehensive personal financial plan.

While building up a financial plan we will incorporate several important blocks such as taxes, use and cost of credit, insurance, savings and investments considerations, and superannuation.

Assessment
Classroom contribution: 5%
In-class quizzes x 3 (15% each): 45%
Group case written report: 20%
Group case presentation: 30%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MFCO231
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 36 100-level points.

This course explores the cultural, ethical and societal effects of disinformation and misinformation. Using case histories from journalists and other media worldwide, and studies from political and social scientists, you will learn to think critically about the information you consume and pass on to others, through both traditional and social media.

You will study, through practical exercises, the shape-shifting nature of news as it circulates around the globe. You will become a better-informed student of information and will examine the proposition that while you are entitled to your own opinions, you are not entitled to your own facts.

Assessment
Reflective social media essay: 50%
Viral story assessment: 30%
Fake news story assessment: 20%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CLAS240
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 18 CLAS, GREK or LATN points, or 54 points, or Head of Department approval.

A study of the mythology, history, warfare, literature, art, archaeology and culture of ancient Greece and Rome in ancient literary and artistic evidence, and as depicted in movies and on television.

Since the advent of motion-picture technology, filmmaking has drawn upon Classical history and recreated Classical myth to entertain modern audiences. Adapting to a new medium invariably involves changes to the original sources, though some changes result from the decision to focus upon different themes or characters, reflecting modern tastes and revealing our own cultural concerns. This paper examines the use of the original Classical material in modern cinema and television, from the ‘sword-and-sandals’ films of the 1950s to the digitally enhanced Hollywood blockbusters of the 2000s.

Assessment
Essay (2000 words):  20%
In-class test: 20%
Final examination (3 hours): 60%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MART330
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 54 200-level points.

This paper is intended for students who want to understand how visual methods such as videography can contribute to representing meaning and ideas in narrative form both in the context of social media and ethnography. Understanding how to create visual narratives and how to use them in a variety of contexts will provide students with contemporary skills that are increasingly sought after by business, academic and social agencies. This paper is a project-driven paper for students interested in visual research using filmmaking and storytelling.

Assessment
Tell and show a story: 10%
Film an interview: 20%
Pitch your project: 20%
Film project: 50%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: PACR101
CREDITS: 18 points

This paper is an introduction to theories of learning and academic skills needed for independent learning and success at university, especially designed for Pacific students new to tertiary study.

Note: No other Summer School paper may be taken concurrently with PACR 101.

Assessment
Written essay outline: 10%
Written essay (1,500 words): 25%
Group project: 25%
Group presentation: 10%
Reflective journal: 10%
Blackboard discussions: 10%
Online self-assessment: 10%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BIOA201
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: One of ARCH 101, ANTH 103, ANTH 106, BIOA 101, BIOL 112, CELS 191, HUBS 191, HUBS 192 and 36 further points, OR 108 points.

An introduction to human bioarchaeology, particularly evolutionary and comparative anatomy of the human body, what makes it unique among other primates, and why it varies among populations. Includes aspects of forensic anthropology.

What makes humans unique to all other primates, and how did we come to be that way? How can we explain the variation in morphology among human populations? How can we use aspects of the skeleton of past people to look at their life history? This paper explores these questions by providing an introduction to the study of Biological Anthropology of the human skeleton. The paper primarily focuses on the evolution, structure and function of the human skeletal system, with an introduction to bioarchaeological and forensic methods.

Assessment
Internal assessment: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 60%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HIST230/333
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite:
HIST 230: One 100-level HIST paper or 108 points
HIST 333: 18 200-level HIST or ARTH or ARTV points

This paper examines the extraordinary transformation in family forms in New Zealand from 1830 to today. It asks how and why these changes occurred and considers the role of the law and medicine in shaping these transformations.

Topics considered include the shift from “natural” reproduction to medically-assisted reproduction (“test-tube babies”); childlessness, adoption and whāngai; controlling and enhancing fertility; debates from the dominant Pākehā nuclear family model to same sex and single parent-led families in the 21st century.

Assessment for HIST 230
Assignments (2 × 700 words): 20%
Essay (2,000 words): 30%
Final examination (2 hours): 50%

Assessment for HIST 333
Assignments (2 x 700 words): 20%
Essay (2,500 words): 30%
Oral presentation: 10%
Final examination (2 hours): 40%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGL127
CREDITS: 18 points

Clear, powerful communication is a prerequisite of success in all endeavours. In our digital age more than ever, communication takes place in written forms with speech, gesture, expression or body language providing fewer clues to meaning. ENGL 127 introduces, or refreshes, key concepts in effective written communication. We study practical aspects of grammar, punctuation, style and mechanics at the level of the sentence, paragraph, essay and beyond. We emphasise practical work, teaching skills you can transfer to your own writing projects.

Please note: Students for whom English is a second language should have attained an overall score of 7.0 in IELTS academic band or the equivalent.

Assessment
Summary test: 10%
Prose revision test: 10%
Essay: 10%
Reading journal: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 30%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGL223/323
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite:
ENGL 223: One 100-level ENGL paper (excluding ENGL 126) or 36 points
ENGL 323: 18 200-level ENGL points
Open for Interest Only enrolment – lectures and tutorials – with Head of Department permission.

Fantasy seems to have become the pop – or even “pulp” – literary genre of the 21st century, almost sidelining modernist realism. Its ascendency or resurgence has drawn attention to the fact that, in the tradition of European and English-language literature, it is realism that is the anomaly. By way of background to the multi-volume “world-building” adult fantasies, this paper will examine texts illustrating the literary uses of fantasy, chronologically from the most ancient text in English, Beowulf, to the great children’s publishing phenomenon for the present day, Harry Potter.

The texts selected do not so much represent hardcore “genre” fantasy, but fantasy as it manifested in mainstream literature at the time.

Assessment
Concepts and reading test: 20%
Essay (2,000 words for 223 / 3,000 words for 323): 30%
Examination (2 hours for 223 / 3 hours for 323): 50%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FREN105
CREDITS: 18 points

An introduction to French for students with little or no previous knowledge of the language. The paper takes an integrated approach to the skills of language acquisition, focusing on practical survival skills.

Do you want to learn another language and be able to travel with confidence in more than 30 countries, or add a new skill to your degree? This intensive course engages students in learning the basic vocabulary and structures of French. The teaching methodology is student-centred with the lecturer acting as facilitator and the ultimate goal of this paper is to make the students independent users of French.

In FREN 105, you will gain skills (in listening, speaking, reading and writing) for communicating in French about your life, your friends and family, your studies and your leisure-time activities. You will also be introduced to French and other francophone cultures.

Assessment
Oral test: 10%
In-class tests: 50%
Final examination (2 hours): 40%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MAOR110
CREDITS: 18 points

An introduction to Māori language with emphasis on pronunciation, greetings and forms of language in particular cultural contexts.

In this course students will develop a basic conversational fluency and proficiency in the pronunciation of the Māori language. Students will learn some basic sentence structure patterns, gaining confidence in using these patterns both in writing and in speaking, as well as aural confidence in listening to basic Māori language. This paper assumes no prior knowledge of the Māori language.

This paper assumes no prior knowledge of the Māori language and gives an introduction to the Māori language with the emphasis on pronunciation, greetings and forms of language in particular cultural contexts.

Assessment
Mahi kōrero (listening/oral): 40%
Mahi whakarongo (listening): 20%
Mahi tuhituhi (written): 40%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: JAPA131
CREDITS: 18 points

An introductory course in reading, writing, speaking and listening to Japanese for students with no previous knowledge of the language. The paper takes an integrated approach to the skills of language acquisition and includes basic material on the cultural heritage of the Japanese people.

Now is the time for you to learn Japanese language and culture. The 2020 Tokyo Olympics is predicted to expand job opportunities for Japanese learners and Japan experts. In this course, you will learn how to develop four language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) through lots of engaging communicative activities in a relaxed environment.

Note: This paper is for beginners only.

Assessment
Oral: 10%
Tests: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 50%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LING103
CREDITS: 18 points

Examination of popular myths from a linguistics perspective. Includes topics such as the origins and nature of language, attitudes toward languages, and language policies. This paper introduces linguistics by critically examining popular misconceptions or “myths” about language.

The paper is divided into three sections. The section on the origins and nature of language considers myths such as whether animals have languages and if invented languages are fake. The section on language attitudes examines myths such as whether English is a killer language and if pidgins and creoles are primitive. The section on language policy and education focuses on myths about language behind language “wars” and if bilingualism slows child development.

Assessment
Class participation: 10%
Optional assignment: 30%
Final examination: 60% or 90%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: RELS237/337
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite:
RELS 237: 36 points
RELS 337: 18 200-level RELS or PSYC points

An introduction to the psychology of religion, with emphasis on what research in contemporary cognitive and evolutionary psychology says about human religious belief and behaviour.

Can religious belief and behaviour be explained by science? What does cognitive and evolutionary psychology tell us about belief in god? Is religion universal? Is religion a product of human evolution? How does religious belief develop in childhood? What social functions does religion serve? Combining scholarship on religion and psychology, this paper introduces students to the important interdisciplinary field of psychology of religion.

In addition to the above questions, students will learn about the latest research on the psychology of terrorism, the psychology of atheism and the psychological effects of religion on prejudice/tolerance. No background experience in religion or psychology is required.

Assessment
Reading comprehension quizzes: 20%
Critical response essays: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 40%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: PHIL106
CREDITS: 18 points

Radical ideas about the human condition. Topics include existentialism, freedom, authenticity, nihilism, feminism, meaning, and modernity. Authors studied include Nietzsche and Sartre.

Assessment
Weekly writing exercise (approx 100 words per week): 10%
Essay (1,000 words): 20%
Essay (1,500 words): 30%
Final examination: 40%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: RELS202/302
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 36 points.

A study of religion relating to archaeological sites, the arts and contemporary culture. Theravada Buddhism is the primary focus of this paper, but the Hindu, Islamic, Chinese and indigenous religious traditions of Southeast Asia are also considered. The paper studies some of the significant archaeological sites of Southeast Asia (Borobudur in Java, Angkor Wat in Cambodia, the Shwedagon in Burma), the association between the arts and religion (trance and spirit possession, Cambodian classical dance, Javanese gamelan and shadow puppet theatre) as well as ritual healing practices and the use of religion – both as a moral force and as the power behind protective devices such as tattoos, amulets and yantras – during times of war.

Assessment
Online tutorial discussion: 20%
Essay (2,500 words): 30%
Examination (two hours): 50%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BIOA201
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: One of ARCH 101, ANTH 103, ANTH 106, BIOA 101, BIOL 112, CELS 191, HUBS 191, HUBS 192 and 36 further points, OR 108 points.

An introduction to human bioarchaeology, particularly evolutionary and comparative anatomy of the human body, what makes it unique among other primates, and why it varies among populations. Includes aspects of forensic anthropology.

What makes humans unique to all other primates, and how did we come to be that way? How can we explain the variation in morphology among human populations? How can we use aspects of the skeleton of past people to look at their life history? This paper explores these questions by providing an introduction to the study of Biological Anthropology of the human skeleton. The paper primarily focuses on the evolution, structure and function of the human skeletal system, with an introduction to bioarchaeological and forensic methods.

Assessment
Internal assessment: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 60%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: RELS237/337
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite:
RELS 237: 36 points
RELS 337: 18 200-level RELS or PSYC points

An introduction to the psychology of religion, with emphasis on what research in contemporary cognitive and evolutionary psychology says about human religious belief and behaviour.

Can religious belief and behaviour be explained by science? What does cognitive and evolutionary psychology tell us about belief in god? Is religion universal? Is religion a product of human evolution? How does religious belief develop in childhood? What social functions does religion serve? Combining scholarship on religion and psychology, this paper introduces students to the important interdisciplinary field of psychology of religion.

In addition to the above questions, students will learn about the latest research on the psychology of terrorism, the psychology of atheism and the psychological effects of religion on prejudice/tolerance. No background experience in religion or psychology is required.

Assessment
Reading comprehension quizzes: 20%
Critical response essays: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 40%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: POLS321
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 18 200-level POLS points or special permission from the Head of Department.

This paper examines how and why policy decisions are made by the New Zealand government, who they are made for, and how they can be changed.

Why do governments pursue certain courses of action and implement particular sets of policies during specific periods of history? Who makes policy and how? Why does policy matter? What is the relationship between economic and political power? Who runs New Zealand? More generally, how do we understand politics? The overall aim of the paper is for students to understand how and why public policy is made in New Zealand and elsewhere.

Assessment
Reading blogs: 10%
Policy theory essay and presentation: 25%
Critical theory essay: 25%
Policy evaluation: 40%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: POLS308
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 18 200-level POLS points or special permission of the lecturer.

The formulation and implementation of US foreign policy. Institutions, the strategy of containment, and the US role in a post-Cold War world.

Assessment
Essay: 30%
Individual tutorial group essay: 20%
Final examination (2 hours): 50%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BIOA201
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: One of ARCH 101, ANTH 103, ANTH 106, BIOA 101, BIOL 112, CELS 191, HUBS 191, HUBS 192 and 36 further points, OR 108 points.

An introduction to human bioarchaeology, particularly evolutionary and comparative anatomy of the human body, what makes it unique among other primates, and why it varies among populations. Includes aspects of forensic anthropology.

What makes humans unique to all other primates, and how did we come to be that way? How can we explain the variation in morphology among human populations? How can we use aspects of the skeleton of past people to look at their life history? This paper explores these questions by providing an introduction to the study of Biological Anthropology of the human skeleton. The paper primarily focuses on the evolution, structure and function of the human skeletal system, with an introduction to bioarchaeological and forensic methods.

Assessment
Internal assessment: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 60%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: PHSI191
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: Students should have passed at least 5 out of 6 laboratories in PHSI 191, but failed overall in the course with a total final mark of at least 30%. Students who have not met this requirement may seek special permission to enter.

Foundations of physics for the health sciences, including mechanics, properties of fluids and solids, thermodynamics and DC circuits, and radiation and health.

This course is intended for students who have passed their laboratory component in the 2019 first semester PHSI 191 course but failed the course overall with a total mark of at least 30%. This course will be similar to PHSI 191 although there will be no laboratory component, and it will have significantly more tutorial-style contact. The laboratory component of a student’s internal assessment in the 2019 first semester course will be carried over to the Summer School course.

Assessment
Mid-school test: 18%
Homework assignments (6 x 1%): 6%
Lab grade carried over from first semester 2019: 6%
Final examination: 70%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: COSC360
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: COSC 242.

This course takes a practical, hands-on approach to making games. We will design, prototype, implement, polish and complete games over the 6-week course. How do we implement a game in a set time frame? How do we ensure its quality? What sets successful developers apart from everyone else with a good idea? Topics will include, but are not limited to: programming, project management, game design, visual design, and case studies from the industry.

This course is designed to introduce students to the multidisciplinary nature of computer game design, with the emphasis on technical skills and group work.

Assessment
Labs: 7%
First game: 11%
Game design: 11%
Game prototyping: 11%
Final presentation:: 6%
Final game 34%
Final examination (2 hours): 20%

Note that the internal assessments may change.

Please note: students wishing to take this course will need to have a strong background in computer programming. If you are interested in taking this paper it is important to apply as early as possible.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: COSC326
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: COSC242.

This paper aims to improve and develop programming skills by setting a series of exercises that require an analytical and creative approach to problem solving. Most – but not all – of these exercises will involve programming tasks. Some will not use computers at all; some will use them only for ancillary tasks. Each solution will be assessed against the requirements, and students will be expected to go back and rework each problem until it is completed satisfactorily. Students will be required to test and debug their programmes fully as well as learn to identify inefficiencies.

The main objectives of this course are to develop and foster general skills concerned with computer-related techniques, understanding a problem, problem-solving strategies and working with people. Most of the exercises will require working in pairs or in teams, although some exercises are individual.

Assessment
There are 15 assignments, called etudes, all of which must be successfully completed to pass the course.

This paper involves a considerable commitment of time and energy. Students are therefore discouraged from enrolling in a second paper.

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COURSE: FORB201
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 54 points. Open for Interest Only enrolment with Head of Department permission.

Increasingly, forensic investigations have come to rest on the techniques of forensic biology to provide vital evidence in homicides, violent crimes, disaster identification and even minor crimes. This course is designed as an introduction for the student who is interested in analysing biological evidence as it relates to legal and other investigations, or collecting and processing evidence at a crime scene or in a laboratory. Students will have an unequalled opportunity to interact with a range of national and international forensic experts, providing a sense of reality and authority that is unique.

The course provides a strong basis in modern forensic biology techniques. The multidisciplinary nature of forensics depends on the integration of scientific skills within a forensic context, and hence the course includes a wide spectrum of topics.

Assessment
Test: 20%
Assignment: 30%
Final examination (2 hour): 50%

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COURSE: COMP101
CREDITS: 18 points

An introduction to the methods and technologies used to build the information systems that run our modern world. You will learn how data is encoded for computer processing, the basics of algorithms and how machines execute algorithms to process data. In addition, you will learn the fundamental concepts of storing and managing data using relational databases, and how to manipulate these databases using query language. Finally, you will examine contemporary issues in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and discuss how use of ICT impacts on our daily life.

This course should be of interest to any students wanting to gain a stronger understanding of how information is stored and manipulated in computer-based systems.

Assessment
In-class tests (2 × 5% and 1 × 10%): 20%
Assignments (2 × 10%): 20%
Final examination: 60%

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COURSE: MATH151
CREDITS: 18 points

This course on mathematical methods, including calculus and algebraic technique, is suitable for students who wish to take at least a service paper in mathematical methods and do not yet have a background in mathematics sufficiently strong to join MATH 160. Emphasis is placed on understanding via examples, and the methods taught are used to study a variety of practical problems. In the process, students’ manipulation skills in algebra and calculus will improve.

Assessment
Written assignments (x5) and computer tests (x3): 35%
Final examination (2 hours): 65%

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COURSE: COMP160
CREDITS: 18 points

Recommended Preparation: COMP150.

An introduction to the art and craft of computer programming and object-oriented design using Java. A first look at building graphical applications.

If you’re serious about computing, then COMP 160 is the key paper for you. It forms a base from which you can learn other programming languages and techniques. While it is suitable for students enrolled for any degree, it is particularly designed for students taking a BSc, BA or BCom degree.

Assessment
Mid-school test: 15%
Laboratory-based exercises: 25%
Final examination (2 hours): 60%

Students must pass the final examination in order to pass the paper

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COURSE: COMP111
CREDITS: 18 points

This course aims to enhance the capacity of students to benefit from information and communication technologies now and in the future. Students will explore the foundations and applications of Information and Communication Technology and examine its current and future impact on individuals, organisations and society. Students will apply widely used software applications to perform real-world business activities.

Assessment
Blackboard tests: 20%
Practical test: 30%
Final examination (2 hours): 50%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MATH160
CREDITS: 18 points

This course consists of half algebra and half calculus, and is the main entry point to 100-level mathematics. The course provides the basis for progression to MATH 170 and then to 200-level mathematics as well as an adequate background to support other subjects.

Assessment
Marked assignments (x10): 16.7% (if they help)
Computer skills tests (x5 each in Algebra and Calculus): 33.3%
Final examination (3 hours): 67.7% (or 50%, if assignments help)

To pass terms, a student must gain at least 5/10 in each of the first four skills tests.

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COURSE: STAT110
CREDITS: 18 points

This course covers descriptive statistics, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, analysis of variance, experimental design, sampling and design principles. The program R will be used throughout the course.

This paper will provide a head start for students wishing to advance in statistics as well as those requiring only the statistical background represented by STAT 110 to proceed in their own disciplines.

Assessment
Online assignment and mastery tests: 33%
Final examination (3 hours): 67%

Grades achieved in the online assignment and mastery tests will count towards the final grade only if this is to the student’s advantage.

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COURSE: PHSI170
CREDITS: 18 points

This course progresses in a largely descriptive way through the essentials of our understanding of the Sun-Earth system and its place in the wider universe. Lecture topics include ancient, classical and modern astronomy, stellar evolution, supernovae, black holes, cosmology and the exploration of the solar system. Special topics will be included, such as the size and age of the universe; the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence; and what the effect would be of a large meteor impact on Earth. The importance of historical aspects and the progressive development of ideas will be emphasised, with a minimum of mathematics. This course is intended for students who have an interest in broad education. We aim to facilitate a continuing interest in astronomy and space exploration.

Assessment
Laboratories and discussion groups: 15%
Essays (2 × 7.5%): 15%
Mid-school test: 10%
Examination (2 hours): 60%

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COURSE: CHEM191
CREDITS: 18 points

An introduction to the concepts of chemistry underlying important processes in biology and human health, including chemical bonding, energetics, kinetics, equilibria and solubility, properties of water and solutions, acids, bases, complexation and electron transfer, mechanisms of organic reactions and properties of amino acids and carbohydrates.

CHEM 191 aims to instill a fundamental knowledge of chemical structure and reactivity, with particular focus on concepts that provide an understanding of why chemical reactions proceed and how this understanding may be applied to the chemical processes in biological systems.

CHEM 191 provides an introduction to concepts influencing chemical reactions in biological systems including:

  • Concepts of Chemical Bonding
  • Thermodynamics/energetics of biological systems
  • Properties of water
  • Reaction rates and chemical equilibria
  • Metals in biology – electron transfer, complexation
  • Organic/carbon-based compounds – stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, functional groups, polymers
  • Biological molecules – carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleic acids, nucleic acids, proteins/enzymes
  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MATS204
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 54 points.

The broad and complex challenges associated with sustainability of materials are examined in this paper, beginning with national and international principles of sustainability, certification models and assessment tools. It will investigate aspects of product lifecycle as it relates to material selection and use, and the role of the consumer. It will also identify key elements affecting materials such as processing, production, design and end-of-life, and explore alternatives.

Assessment
Oral presentation: 15%
Lifecycle mapping: 25%
Analysis of product sustainability: 60%

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus

Excursions

While there are no excursions included on this program, there are a number of cultural activities and places of interest you can choose to visit on your own (at own expense).

Some suggestions in Dunedin and New Zealand include:

  • First Church, Dunedin
  • Dunedin Railway Station
  • Dunedin Botanic Gardens
  • Otago Peninsula
  • Hobbiton
  • Lake Taupo
  • Abel Tasman National Park
  • Milford Sound
  • Queenstown

Location

Dunedin will be your host city during this January in New Zealand program. Located at the southern tip of the South Island, Dunedin is a mid-sized city with enough going on to ensure you make the most of your time abroad.

Dunedin is one of the adventure capitals of the world! Dunedin and its surrounding hinterland offers world-class hiking, skiing, water sports, bungee jumping and adventure tourism, as well as incredible landscapes. And don’t forget to hang out with the locals and help them cheer on the local team in one the many games of rugby union (unless they are playing Australia that is)!

The University

Founded in 1869, the University of Otago is only a short walk away from the bustling city centre. Known for its stellar academics that cater to students in medical, biomedical, biological and natural science fields, it also has many opportunities for those studying arts, law and business.

Twenty percent of Dunedin’s population is made up of university students with 1,000 of the 20,000 being international students from over 100 different countries. The city literally revolves around the university.

There are also plenty of opportunities to join in many different events and activities at the University and within the city! Over 100 sports, arts, cultural and faith groups are supported by the University’s Student Association (OUSA).

Accommodation

Students will stay in fully catered, on-campus university dormitory-style accommodation.

Students have their own room with central heating, king single bed, book shelf, wardrobe, chair, desk, drawers, curtains and rubbish bin – all the basics. Sheets and a pillow case are provided along with a weekly linen service.

Internet is included within your accommodation – 90% of rooms have wireless internet and 10% require a LAN internet connection.

Three meals per day are included in the package. There is also a dining hall, gym, meeting / common rooms and, depending on the time of the year, various social activities.

Please note: the exam period for Otago’s Summer School is the week that first-year university students will be moving into their housing for the semester. Because of this, students will be required to vacate their housing and move into alternate housing for the last week of the program (typically a different dorm room). The on-site team at Otago will be able to assist and provide further information when the time comes for you to move.

Program Fee & Dates

January 2020
Note: Program fees listed below are for Australian citizens only. If you are an international student (i.e. non-Australian citizen), please contact us for program fees.
Application Deadline02 December 2019
Arrival Date04 January 2020
Departure Date20 February 2020
Program Fee A$ 5,599 - 6,599
OS-HELP A$ 6,913

 

Program fees include the following:
  • Tuition fees
  • CISaustralia support services before, during and after the program
  • Academic advising
  • Financial advice
  • Assistance with travel arrangements
  • Medical and accident insurance (if requested)
  • Pre-departure guide and session
  • Airport pick-up (on specified program arrival date within designated arrival times)
  • University of Otago orientation
  • Accommodation
  • 3 meals per day
  • CISaustralia 24/7 on-site support – Site Director
  • University of Otago official transcript
  • CISaustralia Certificate of Completion

What is not included:

  • Flights
  • Travel insurance
  • Visa fees
  • Vaccinations (if required)
  • Meals (unless mentioned above)
  • Extra travel/excursions (other than those mentioned above)

Dates are for reference only and are subject to change. Please do not book flights until you have received the confirmed dates in your acceptance paperwork.

CISaustralia reserves the right to alter fees at any time due to currency fluctuations and/or fee changes made by our partner universities.

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