Humanities and Language Courses

Broaden your Humanities horizons and enhance your career prospects! Choose from hundreds of courses in a wide range of subjects, including Archaeology, Art History, English and Literature, History, Linguistics, Philosophy and Religious Studies, World Languages, Writing and much more!
FILTER BY
Program Types:
  • January Study
  • July Study
  • Language Study
Countries:
  • Belize
  • Cambodia
  • Canada
  • China & Hong Kong
  • Costa Rica
  • England
  • Fiji
  • France
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Nepal
  • Netherlands
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Scotland
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • Uganda
  • USA
  • Vietnam
  • Zambia
Area of Study:
  • Humanities and Languages
    • Archaeology
    • Art History
    • English, Literature and Writing
    • History
    • Humanitarian and NGOs
    • Philosophy and Religious Studies
    • World Languages and Linguistics

Need a recommendation? Contact us and we can assist you in finding the right program.

ENQUIRE NOW
Available Courses by Program
COURSE: GSDGNN350 / ISILNN350 / LACRNN350 / LSSONN350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session 3, B

This course is centred around Ferrante’s four-volume work known as The Neapolitan Novels: My Brilliant Friend (2011), The Story of a New Name (2012), Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (2013), The Story of the Lost Child (2015). Lectures will investigate the multifaceted universe of a friendship between two women, Lila and Lenù, from their childhood to adulthood. It also aims to shed light on the connections between their experiences and Southern Italy’s complex history and culture from the post-WWII war years to the present. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course will examine the protagonists’ effort to break out of the circle of extreme poverty, illiteracy, and male violence.

Amongst the themes addressed by this course through the study The Neapolitan Novels, students will explore issues such as post-war settlement in Italy and in the South, Italy’s Southern Question, the Neapolitan Camorra and its influence on the poor, the changing role of women during the Seventies, the “Economic Miracle”, terrorism during the “anni di piombo”, student movements in the late Sixties, Italian factory strikes throughout the Seventies, and technological advancements for computing machines.

This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural; because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multi-fold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centred process.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGL 4W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36.

Introduction to literary analysis, with close reading and carefully written exposition of selections from principal modes of literature: poetry, prose fiction, and drama. Minimum of 15 to 20 pages of revised writing.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGL 9115D
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H.

Study of British and American detective fiction and literature of detection.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CLASSIC 20
CREDITS: 5 Units

Study of Roman life and culture from time of city’s legendary foundations to end of classical antiquity. Readings focus on selections from works of ancient authors in translation. Lectures illustrated with images of art, architecture, and material culture. Knowledge of Latin not required.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGCOMP 3
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing Requirement.

Rhetorical techniques and skillful argument. Analysis of varieties of academic prose and writing of minimum of 20 pages of revised text.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGL 139
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3.

Specialized study of work of one single Anglophone poet, dramatist, prose writer, or novelist. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGL 20W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing Requirement.

Designed to introduce fundamentals of creative writing and writing workshop experience. Emphasis on poetry, fiction, drama, or creative nonfiction depending on wishes of instructor(s) during any given term. Readings from assigned texts, weekly writing assignments (multiple drafts and revisions), and final portfolio required. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 20.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGL 119
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H.

Exploration of place of literary imagination in making of cities, with focus on questions of cultural exchange, development, migration, urban rebellion, and style. Topics may include meaning of urban space and time, city as urban village or cosmopolitan hub, segregated dystopia or postmodern future, and impact of exile, tourism, and migration in making of cities. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

Examination–through poetry, novels, stories, music, and film–New York underground, whether that be of avant-garde artists, people living on edge of respectability (such as hustlers or punks), or people otherwise marginalized by dominant cultural norms. Students read stories and watch feature films that depict this underground; but also look at material produced by artists that challenged cultural and aesthetic norms. Writers and artists include Glenn Branca, Frank O’Hara, Martin Scorsese, Patti Smith, Andy Warhol, David Wojnarowicz, and many others.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: COM LIT 4DW
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36.

Study and discussion of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Texts may include works by authors such as Ngugi, Desai, Kincaid, Emecheta, El Saadawi, Achebe, Pak, Can Xue, Neruda, and Rushdie. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGL 115E
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H.

Study of science fiction and speculative literatures.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGL 90
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing Requirement.

Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: GENDER M107A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Focus on women writers that may include historical, regional, national, or thematic emphasis, with possible topics such as authorship, self-writing, sexuality, gender, and genre. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENGL M138
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introductory workshop in genre(s) of instructor choice, that may include mixed genres, playwriting, screenwriting, literary nonfiction, or others. Enrollment in more than one section per term not permitted. May be repeated for maximum of 10 units. May not be used to satisfy workshop requirements for English creative writing concentration.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: GENDER 101W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Development of critical reading and writing skills necessary for academic success. Students engage assigned readings in conversation with week’s leading question. Generation and continuous development of paper topic as result of in-class discussions and formal writing exercises. Small writing groups assist students in understanding relationship between how written thoughts are presented and how they are comprehended by different readers. Students gain understanding of writing process, including topic conceptualization, objective of writing project, organization of thoughts and resources, selection of objects of study, personal writing style, etc.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ISSU9SF
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 1

This module introduces students to the diverse literary traditions and political, national, and gender identities in Science Fiction texts.

COURSE: ISSU9BE
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 1

This module has been designed to help students realise their creative potential by producing original and stimulating short fiction. Teaching will consist of specialist workshops conducted by an expert in the field. In addition to engaging with practical aspects of craft and technique, students will learn how to create believable, compelling characters and how to make them live (and die!) on the page. They will also have the opportunity to visit sites of historic importance and natural beauty to inspire their writing.

Excursion(s): The module includes a live ‘reading’ at a leading local arts centre, where you’ll have the chance to share the stage with a prominent Scottish writer.

COURSE: ISSU9MV
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 2

From sparkly vampires to blockbuster monsters, gothic tropes appear to be all-pervasive in contemporary culture. As Catherine Spooner claims in Contemporary Gothic (2006), like ‘a malevolent virus, Gothic narratives have escaped the confines of literature and spread across disciplinary boundaries to infect all kinds of media, from fashion and advertising to the way contemporary events are constructed in mass culture’. What this course aims to do is to introduce students to Gothic’s literary expression in the British nineteenth century, before exploring the many ways in which this dark heritage continues to affect contemporary cultural production.

Focusing on three key texts from the nineteenth century, Frankenstein (1818), The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) and Dracula (1897), this class will discuss their adaptation, appropriation and influence on popular narratives such as those found in fiction, film, tv, fashion and music video. Some of the contemporary texts we will be drawing upon will be Twilight (book & film), True Blood (book & tv), Buffy the Vampire Slayer (film & tv), Scream (film), Supernatural (tv), Marilyn Manson (music), Interview with a Vampire (book & film), Blade (film), Blairwitch Project (film) etc.

Excursion(s): A visit to Edinburgh Dungeon and a gothic themed bar are included.

COURSE: ISSU9SC
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 2

For the past decade, Scotland’s national status has been ‘both dangled before us and tantalizingly withheld’ (poet Don Paterson). With attention focused on the question of independence, recent debates concerning Scottish culture and identity gain a heightened political charge. Literature has not only reflected but actively shaped such debate. In the year the new Scottish Parliament was established (1998), Christopher Whyte argued that ‘in the absence of elected political authority, the task of representing the nation has been repeatedly devolved to its writers’. But what influence have writers played in recent political change, and to what extent has Scottish culture escaped its own stereotypes?

This course examines the literary and political currents shaping contemporary Scottish identity, introducing students to key twentieth- and twenty-first century texts. We encounter and explain a range of cultural debates concerning language, class, democracy and nationhood, attending to the urgency as well as the complexity of recent Scottish writing.

Excursion: There will be an excursion to Edinburgh, visiting the Scottish Parliament building and Scottish Writers Museum.

One Moment...

Adventure Awaits

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive the latest updates on all CISaustralia programs, scholarships, news and more!