July in Los Angeles, USA at UCLA

Live and study in sunny, seaside Los Angeles, California on the west coast of the USA. Take classes at the diverse and prestigious University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) for a fun and productive short-term course abroad.

Program Overview

Spend 6 weeks studying at one of the best Universities in the world – gain credit while experiencing a global city and campus like no other!

In 2013–2014, UCLA ranked 12th in academics and 8th for reputation in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings.

As a UCLA ‘summer’ (July) session student you have access to hundreds of academic courses, on and off campus living options, all of the university facilities, including multiple gyms, pools, libraries…..everything you need!

Start getting excited about:

Having the opportunity to be a part of a university that receives more student applications than any other in the US. Actually make that the world! This is the university that students dream of attending, and as a CISaustralia student you will have that opportunity.

Choose to study from a multitude of disciplines – business, management, finance, accounting, humanities, the arts, social science, sociology, anthropology, history, communications, journalism, health and health related fields, IT, engineering and more.

UCLA has everything you could possibly need to have an interesting and fun-filled Aussie winter (US summer). Beginning with its lush landscaping and impressive architecture, the campus is an experience in itself – add to this modern residential halls, libraries, world class athletic facilities, a multitude of entertainment opportunities and you realise that a US summer (July) session at UCLA is not only academically rewarding but also a great place to spend six weeks of your Australian winter!

Living and studying in the entertainment capital of the world – LA. It’s a cultural mecca boasting more than 300 museums, not to mention a paradise of good weather. LA has an average of 284 – 312 days of sunshine every year (not all the authorities can agree). Let’s just say that it’s sunny a lot! Compare this to 185 sunny days per year in Melbourne or even 261 for Brisbane!

You can study in a welcoming environment that appreciates diversity and a global perspective. At the CISaustralia July in Los Angeles program, you will be studying on the UCLA campus with more than 17,000 US students and more than 1,300 international students enrolled over the US ‘summer’ session.

Enjoy summer in LA – experience outdoor concerts at the Hollywood Bowl and the Greek Theater. Many activities in the city are free, including stargazing at the Griffith Observatory, hipster watching in Silver Lake and outings to the mountains and beaches.

Highlights

LA and UCLA have it all! There are 1-2 cultural excursions/activities included in the program fees, plus you will have plenty of free time to check out some of the awesome things you can discover firsthand on your own during your program.

  • Amazing University in a beautiful, inspiring setting – there is a reason why UCLA receives more applications than any other university in the world!
  • Six weeks living and experiencing all LA has to offer – weekend trips to Disneyland, Magic Mountain, Universal Studios, walking down Santa Monica Boulevard, window shopping in Beverly Hills, people watching in Venice Beach and catching a Dodgers baseball game
  • Gain credit for two academic courses that are available to full-time UCLA students during the academic year
  • Be guided by world class lecturers and professors – UCLA boasts a research focus that is envied by most institutions around the globe
  • Choose from hundreds of UCLA courses – it’s not easy to select just two
  • Meet students from around the world – create a lifelong network of like-minded and motivated friends
  • All the amazing places you can visit from your base in LA! Places like Las Vegas, Yosemite National Park, San Francisco, San Diego and even Mexico
  • Enjoy being a part of arguably the entertainment capital of the world, LA is a cultural mecca boasting more than 300 museums!
  • While Australia is in the middle of winter, take 6 weeks out in the Californian summer
  • Try out new restaurants, visit the tourist attractions or sit back and chill out on the beach

Eighth-best university in the world!

UCLA was ranked the eighth-best university in the world (2015) and the second-best public university in the United States in a global rankings report released by U.S. News & World Report.

The university remained in the same spot it held last year in the inaugural Best Global Universities report. The report ranked 750 universities from 57 countries – an increase from 500 institutions ranked in 2014. U.S. News & World Report included the top 200 universities from the Thomson Reuters’ global reputation survey, which aimed to gather academics’ opinions of universities around the world.

Click here to read more.

Choose Your Course

UCLA has one of the strongest education brands in the USA and globally. UCLA is highly ranked and sought after by students worldwide and it receives the most applications of any university in the world!

In 2013–14, UCLA ranked 12th in academics and 8th for reputation in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. In 2013, Business Insider ranked UCLA as having the most driven students in the world, boosting the school’s prestige with respect to recruiting and hiring.

As an international student at UCLA for the US ‘summer’ session you have hundreds of courses to choose from, from ecology and engineering to dance and psychology, from gender studies to Japanese and linguistics – the options are phenomenal. You are able to enrol in academic courses that are exclusively available to full-time UCLA students during the academic year.

Course Load: A minimum of two courses (8 US credits). As an international student you will need to take 2 courses minimum (or equivalent minimum of 8 US credits). UCLA is very clear that students MUST be enrolled in a minimum of 8 US credits (could be 2 x 4 US credits or some other combination) to keep their valid student visa.

  • Depending on your Australian university, “courses” may be referred to as “subjects” or “units”.
  • Each course/subject/unit you undertake on a CISaustralia program is designed to be a full-time, semester course that has been condensed to fit into an intensive, short-term program. As such, for any 1 course you study abroad, you should receive the credit points for 1 full-time course/subject/unit at your Australian university.
  • Many universities work off of a 1-for-1 equivalency (1 course abroad = 1 course in Australia), but ultimately credit approval is the decision of your faculty and Australian university.
  • CISaustralia strongly recommends that you have any overseas courses pre-approved for academic credit before you depart for your program. Some documentation that may be useful are the course outline/syllabus, program overview and the contact hours.
  • It is best to get 4 or 5 courses approved by your Australian university before you depart for your overseas program. This way you will have plenty of classes to choose from and some flexibility in setting up your schedule.
  • Your CISaustralia Program Advisor can assist with any questions or details your university needs to make a decision.

How to Choose Your Courses: Now this is the fun part. As part of your application you will complete a CISaustralia Course Selection Worksheet. The instructions provided will assist you through the steps involved in selecting your courses.

Disciplines included in UCLA ‘Summer’ (July) Session include:

  • Business and Management
  • Cultural Studies
  • Engineering and Computer Science
  • Film and Television
  • Language and Literature
  • Mathematics
  • Medicine
  • Natural and Physical Sciences
  • Performing Arts
  • Social Sciences
  • Sustainability
  • Visual Arts
  • …and much more!

On the first day of class your instructor will let you know what textbooks you need to buy. Most assigned textbooks will be available for purchase at the UCLA Bookstore.

You may add and/or drop courses anytime before 5 p.m. Friday, Week 1 of the program. After this deadline late fees will apply. It is your responsibility to make sure any course changes in the U.S. are pre-approved by your University in Australia.

Academic Requirement: To qualify for this program, students must be in good academic standing with a GPA of 4.5 (out of 7) or equivalent. If your current GPA falls below the requirement, you may still be considered for the program but will need to be prepared to provide supporting documentation. Please contact us to discuss your situation and we will work with you to help find another suitable program if required.

2019 Course Descriptions: Note that UCLA is known to alter their course offerings frequently, so please be aware courses listed below are subject to change. Please enquire with your CISaustralia Program Advisor to confirm if the courses you are interested in are still on offer.

COURSE: THEATER 20
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to interpretation of drama through art of actor. Development of individual insights, skills, and disciplines in presentation of dramatic material to audiences.

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COURSE: THEATER 120A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of acting and performance in film. Through screenings of performance-driven films, class discussion, and acting exercises, examination of methods, styles, and performances of some of world’s most highly regarded actors and their work.

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COURSE: THEATER 21
CREDITS: 2-4 US credits

Development and practice in acting techniques. Preparation and taping of scenes for analysis.

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COURSE: ART 113
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Course 11A

Varied media and subjects to further develop students’ technical and expressive means to implement their ideas. May be repeated for maximum of 20 units.

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COURSE: ART HIS 133D
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Architecture as vehicle for political and cultural authority, citizenship, ethnic and social identity; its role in defining place and our relationship to natural environment and as vehicle for asserting human control over natural world; its place in world of work and commerce; and its status as professional and aesthetic pursuit.

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COURSE: ART HIS M110A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Study of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts during Predynastic period and Old Kingdom. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

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COURSE: MSC IND
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to basic acoustic principles, practical techniques, and working procedures for equipment used in contemporary music production, including microphones, mixers, recorders, synthesizers, and sequencers. Basic sound processing operations (equalization, compression, distortion, reverberation). Operating principles of most popular systems of music production software and hardware.

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COURSE: DANCE 13
CREDITS: 2 Units

Beginning-level study of ballet as movement practice.

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COURSE: MUSC 80F
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to guitar techniques, accompanying, and arranging for guitar; coverage of note reading and tablature. May be repeated for credit without limitation.

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COURSE: MUSC 80A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Simple keyboard skills together with basic aspects of music theory and its practical application to keyboard: sight-reading, tonality, chords, scales, cadences, simple compositions, and improvisations. May be repeated for credit without limitation.

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COURSE: DANCE 15
CREDITS: 2 Units

Study of modern and/or postmodern movement practice.

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COURSE: ART 11E
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to ceramic materials and processes, with emphasis on personal and cultural expression in ceramic media. Discussion of ceramics in contemporary artistic practice and social history of ceramic art. Letter grading.

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COURSE: M107
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to development of rap music and hip-hop culture, with emphasis on musical and verbal qualities, philosophical and political ideologies, gender representation, and influences on cinema and popular culture. P/NP or letter grading.

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COURSE: DESMA 10
CREDITS: 5 Units

Open to non-majors. Understanding design process, with emphasis on development of visual language; study of historic, scientific, technological, economic, and cultural factors influencing design in physical environment.

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COURSE: THEATER 107
CREDITS: 5 Units

Investigation of diversity in American society as manifested in dramatic works and theatrical presentations.

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COURSE: THEATER 30
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Intended for Theater minors and other non majors. Exploration and development of creative writing skills for one or more of various forms of entertainment media.

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COURSE: DESMA 21
CREDITS: 4 US credits

For drawing, exploration of relationship between concept and image creation while fostering development of sound drawing and observation skills. For color, exploration of development of fundamental skills in mixing and applying pigments with brush on watercolor paper, as well as use of computer as tool for working with colors. Combination of painting and software to be predominant way of exploring and presenting ideas regarding color. Studio, six hours; outside study, six hours.

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COURSE: ETHNMUS 25
CREDITS: 5 Units

Development of world music or world beat, including its meaning and importance to contemporary culture as well as its history and impact.

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COURSE: THEATER 110
CREDITS: 5 Units

Survey of history of American musical: its composers, writers, and performers from musical’s emergence in immigrant cultures to Broadway and Off-Broadway. With its roots in British music halls and comic opera, Viennese operetta and African American jazz, American musical theater emerged as vivid and popular art form with its own culture and identity.

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COURSE: ARCH&UD 10B
CREDITS: 5 Units

Survey of architectural and urban history from 1600 to present in global context. Exploration of buildings, cities, spaces, artifacts, landscapes, and ideas through their relation to geopolitical conditions and through their relation to theories of design.

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COURSE: ARCH&UD CM153 / ENVIRON M153
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Relationship of built environment to natural environment through whole systems approach, with focus on sustainable design of buildings and planning of communities. Emphasis on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and appropriate use of resources, including materials, water, and land.  

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COURSE: THEATER 10
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of theater in production, with emphasis on collaborative role of theater artists and active role of audience. Understanding of and access to live theatrical event and enhanced appreciation of value of theater to society; development of critical skills through consideration of representative examples of theatrical production from Europe, America, Asia, and Africa.

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COURSE: ETHNMUS 50A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Survey of development of jazz in American culture. Discussion of different compositional/performance techniques and approaches that distinguish different sub-styles of jazz from one another, as well as key historical figures that shaped development of jazz from its early years through modern jazz. Important historical social issues (segregation, Depression, World War II, Civil Rights Movement) that intersect with history of U.S. and jazz music.

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COURSE: DESMA 24
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction and integration of traditional design tools, camera, and digital technologies for application to visual thinking and fundamentals of design. Studio, six hours; outside study, six hours.

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COURSE: ETHNMUS 30
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of ways music is mediated to people by industry, technologies, and corporations. Survey of leading theorists of media and exploration of case studies.

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COURSE: CHICANO M108A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Survey of traditional and contemporary musical culture.

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COURSE: MUSC 3
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Course in music fundamentals, including musicianship, theory, and terminology.

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COURSE: MUSC 188
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of young but quickly growing profession of music therapy in health care industry. Students gain comprehensive understanding of music therapy, what it takes to become board-certified music therapist, and standards of practice and research. Students gain ability to define music therapy and advocate its services within community, and general understanding of how to assess and carry out music therapy session. Students participate in classroom activities that include simple songwriting, lyric analysis, instrumentation, and discussion. Prior music training not required. Includes homework, research assignments, and quizzes. In final group project, students work together to assess hypothetical client and create two session plans with clearly stated objectives.

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COURSE: THEATER 138
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Study of complex problems in voice, movement, and acting.

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COURSE: MSC IND 115
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of techniques, methods, and process of music production and larger issues in art of making music. Students learn how to foster and capture performance and emotion in music through variety of methods and tools, including artistic direction in studio and choices made in sound, arrangement, and application of technology.

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COURSE: DESMA 25
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Focus on three typographic basics: letter, text, and grid. Introduction to fundamentals of typography. Assignments designed to develop understanding of form, scale, and shape of letters as single elements and as texture in layout. Emphasis on grid (structure and layout) and information hierarchy to create successful typographic messages. Studio, six hours; outside study, six hours.

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COURSE: MUSC 7
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Musical experience helpful, but not required. Brief historical survey of film music, with strong emphasis on recent development: Japanese animation, advertising, and MTV, as well as computer tools and digital scoring methods. Designed to inspire and inform those interested in movie music.

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COURSE: MUSC 80V
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Voice instruction for singers at beginning to intermediate level. Exploration of fundamentals of vocal technique, including overview of basics of proper breath control, resonance, care of voice, diction, and interpretation. Beginning vocal repertoire used as vehicle for understanding these concepts. May be repeated for credit without limitation.

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COURSE: DANCE 11
CREDITS: 2 Units

Beginning-level study of yoga.

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COURSE: MGMT 108
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Essentials of contracts, agency, partnerships, corporations, and other select areas of law in a business environment.

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COURSE: ENVIRON 163
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of role of business in mitigating environmental degradation and incentives to be more environmentally responsive. Emphasis on corporate strategies that deliver value to shareholders while responding to environmental concerns.

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COURSE: INTL DV 110
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Broad introduction to theoretical traditions in development studies, with focus on interactions between states, markets, and cultural value systems, with selected case studies in developing nations.

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COURSE: HIST 134C
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Changing European economy after World War I and II and in 1990s; impact of fourth and fifth Industrial Revolutions; Great Depressions of century during 1930s, 1970s, and 1980s; and changing modernization strategies; import-substituting industrialization in peripheries; Soviet modernization dictatorship in East Central Europe and its collapse; integration process of second half of century and rise of European Union; modernization model at end of century.

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COURSE: EDUC 129
CREDITS: 5 Units

Seminar, four hours. Research seminar providing overview of high-profile legal controversies that shape so many policy debates at both K-12 and higher education levels. Major areas of focus include campus safety, religion and schools, educational quality and law, broad based right to equal educational opportunity, and Internet-related issues and concerns.

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COURSE: MGMT 126
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Management 120B.

Comprehensive study of concepts and procedures used to interpret and analyze balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. Calculation and interpretation of financial ratios and credit analysis. Valuation theory using both discounted cash flows and residual income model.

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COURSE: GEOG M128 / URBN PL CM166
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Questions of population, resource use, Third World poverty, and environment. Analysis of global economic restructuring and its connections to changing organization of production and resulting environmental impacts. Case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and U.S.

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COURSE: COMM 148
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of key concepts and methods in marketing communications in both traditional and digital media. Development and execution of communications strategies, with primary emphasis on consumer insight, branding, market segmentation and positioning, message strategy, promotion, and execution of marketing communications through appropriate media technologies.

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COURSE: MGMT 120A
CREDITS: 5 US credits

Pre-requisite: Management 1B.

Intermediate-level course in theory and practice of financial accounting. Underlying concepts of asset valuation and income measurement. Measurement and reporting of current and long-term assets, including cash and marketable securities, inventories, plant assets and depreciation, and intangibles.

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COURSE: ECON 106G
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisites: Course 101 / Co-requisite: Course 106GL

Enrollment priority to Business Economics majors. Introduction to basic ideas of game theory and strategic thinking. Discussion of ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, and signaling, with application to examples from economics, politics, business, and other real-life situations.

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COURSE: UG LAW 183
CREDITS: 2 Units

Introduction to basic principles of criminal law. How to read and interpret judicial cases and provisions of penal code to learn how American criminal justice system works. Discussions structured to simulate experience of typical law school classroom.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 169
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Specific topics may include law in preindustrial and industrialized societies, legalization of contemporary social relations, participants’ experiences of legal processes, lay perceptions of justice, social movements toward equal justice, roles of lawyers and judges, social impact of court decisions.

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COURSE: MGMT 182
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Proven methods for motivating, and inspiring best performance, persuading, and influencing others; leading high-performance teams; creativity and innovation; decision-making, and negotiating skills, both one-on-one and in groups. Organizational examples, simulations, and in-class exercises.

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COURSE: MGMT 122
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Course 1B, one statistics course.

Nature, objectives, and procedures of cost accounting and control; job costing and process costing; accounting for manufacturing overhead; cost budgeting; cost reports; joint-product costing; distribution cost; standard costs; differential cost analysis; profit-volume relationships and break-even analysis.

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COURSE: ECON 160
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Course 102

Principles of money and banking in U.S.; legal and institutional framework; money supply process; instruments, effects, and practice of monetary policy.

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COURSE: FILM TV 84A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of evolving economic structures and business practices in contemporary Hollywood film industry, with emphasis on operations of studios and independent distribution companies, their development, marketing, and distribution systems, and their relationship to independent producers, talent, and agencies.

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COURSE: PHILOS 166
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination, through study of recent philosophical writings, of such topics as nature of law, relationship of law and morals, legal reasoning, punishment, and obligation to obey law.

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COURSE: INTL DV M120
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Contact CISaustralia for course description.

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COURSE: MGMT 1A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to financial accounting principles, including preparation and analysis of financial transactions and financial statements. Valuation and recording of asset-related transactions, including cash, receivables, marketable securities, inventories, and long-lived assets. Current liabilities.

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COURSE: ECON 1
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to principles of economic analysis, economic institutions, and issues of economic policy. Emphasis on allocation of resources and distribution of income through price system.

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COURSE: GLBL ST 160
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Over last five decades, the world has increasingly become globalized, presenting many new opportunities for businesses and entrepreneurs. However, recent world events have demonstrated volatile nature of globalization and pitfalls that can also manifest for firms doing business in global setting. Students gain understanding of dynamic environment of international business, and how firm managers navigate complex world of international business to capitalize upon opportunities and mitigate against risks.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 147A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Sociological theories of social origins, organization, and meanings of crime and criminal behaviors.

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COURSE: MGMT 180
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Topics of special interest to undergraduate students. Specific subjects may vary each term depending on particular interest of instructors or students. Focus on proven methods for succeeding in one-on-one interactions, small groups, and large audiences. Topics include accelerating trust and rapport, best question-asking strategies, executive communication skills, strengthening leadership presence, strengthening one’s relationships, network and reputation, and staying poised under pressure.

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COURSE: ECON 41
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B.

Introduction to probability and statistics for economists, with emphasis on rigorous arguments. Not open to students with credit for former Statistics 11.

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COURSE: MGMT 127A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Management 1B.

Study of fundamental income tax problems encountered by individuals and other entities in analyzing business, investment, employment, and personal decisions. Special emphasis on role of tax rules in capital transactions and decision making.

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COURSE: THEATER 120A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of acting and performance in film. Through screenings of performance-driven films, class discussion, and acting exercises, examination of methods, styles, and performances of some of world’s most highly regarded actors and their work.

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COURSE: THEATER 21
CREDITS: 2-4 US credits

Development and practice in acting techniques. Preparation and taping of scenes for analysis.

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COURSE: FILM TV 146
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of role of producer as both artist and business person. Comparative analysis of screenplays and completed films. Emphasis on assembly of creative team and analysis of industrial context, both independent and studio. Screenings viewed outside of class and on reserve at Powell Library.

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COURSE: COMM 157
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Analysis of how following personal lives of media-created celebrities impacts self-esteem, connectedness, and personal relationships from cultural studies and social sciences perspectives, and how entities cultivate celebrity for financial gain. Topics include celebrity gossip and privacy, news sharing, public relations, and impact of social media on fan support, image construction, and damage control.

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COURSE: COMM 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Course 10 or Linguistics 1 or Sociology 1 or Psychology 10.

Analysis of fundamental nature of human communication; its physical, linguistic, psychological, and sociological bases. Study of theoretical models explicating process and constituents of communicative act.

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COURSE: FILM TV 12E
CREDITS: 4 US credits

With lectures, screenings, and demonstrations, study of principles of digital cinematography. How tools and techniques affect visual storytelling process. Topics include formats, aspect ratios, cameras, lenses, special effects, internal menu picture manipulation, lighting, composition, coverage, high definition, digital exhibition, filtration, multiple-camera shooting.

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COURSE: FILM TV 122J
CREDITS: 5 Units

Study and analysis of Disney’s animated features. Evaluation of why Disney’s animated features have dominated until recently and ramifications of this dominance on animation and society.

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COURSE: THEATER 30
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Intended for Theater minors and other non majors. Exploration and development of creative writing skills for one or more of various forms of entertainment media.

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COURSE: FILM TV 122D
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Practical application of film editing techniques, how they have evolved, and continue to evolve. Examination of history of editing, as well as current editing trends, terminology, and workflow.

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COURSE: FILM TV 122M
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Through discussions, screenings, demonstrations, and guests, exploration of script, previsualization, directing actors, directing camera coverage in relationship to story, practical on-set directing, and directing for camera.

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COURSE: COMM 148
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of key concepts and methods in marketing communications in both traditional and digital media. Development and execution of communications strategies, with primary emphasis on consumer insight, branding, market segmentation and positioning, message strategy, promotion, and execution of marketing communications through appropriate media technologies.

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COURSE: FILM TV 4
CREDITS: 5 Units

Students acquire understanding of practical and aesthetic challenges undertaken by artists and professionals in making of motion pictures and television. Examination of film as both art and industry: storytelling, sound and visual design, casting and performance, editing, finance, advertising, and distribution. Exploration of American and world cinema from filmmaker’s perspective. Honing of analytical skills and development of critical vocabulary for study of filmmaking as technical, artistic, and cultural phenomenon.

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COURSE: COMM 10
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to fields of mass communication and interpersonal communication. Study of modes, media, and effects of mass communication, interpersonal processes, and communication theory.

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COURSE: FILM TV 33
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Structural analysis of feature films and development of professional screenwriters’ vocabulary for constructing, deconstructing, and reconstructing their own work. Screenings of films and selected film sequences in class and by assignment.

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COURSE: ENGL 119
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H.

Exploration of place of literary imagination in making of cities, with focus on questions of cultural exchange, development, migration, urban rebellion, and style. Topics may include meaning of urban space and time, city as urban village or cosmopolitan hub, segregated dystopia or postmodern future, and impact of exile, tourism, and migration in making of cities. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

Examination–through poetry, novels, stories, music, and film–New York underground, whether that be of avant-garde artists, people living on edge of respectability (such as hustlers or punks), or people otherwise marginalized by dominant cultural norms. Students read stories and watch feature films that depict this underground; but also look at material produced by artists that challenged cultural and aesthetic norms. Writers and artists include Glenn Branca, Frank O’Hara, Martin Scorsese, Patti Smith, Andy Warhol, David Wojnarowicz, and many others.

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COURSE: ETHNMUS 30
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of ways music is mediated to people by industry, technologies, and corporations. Survey of leading theorists of media and exploration of case studies.

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COURSE: FILM TV 84A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of evolving economic structures and business practices in contemporary Hollywood film industry, with emphasis on operations of studios and independent distribution companies, their development, marketing, and distribution systems, and their relationship to independent producers, talent, and agencies.

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COURSE: COMM 1
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing.

Examination of foundations of communication and public speaking. Consideration of number of basic theories related to study of communication and development of skills to enable composition and delivery of speeches in accordance with specific rhetorical concepts. Improvement of ability to analyze, organize, and critically think about communicative messages while becoming better equipped to articulate ideas.

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COURSE: FILM TV 183A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Critical analysis of contemporary entertainment industries and practical approach to understanding and implementing producer’s role in development of feature film and television scripts. Through scholarly and trade journal readings, in-class discussions, script analysis, and select guest speakers, exposure to various entities that comprise feature film and television development process. Basic introduction to story and exploration of proper technique for evaluating screenplays and teleplays through writing of coverage.

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COURSE: RELIGN 160
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of complex relationship between religious traditions and various media (e.g., print, film, photography, television, radio, and electronic) as they have intersected in specific historical and cultural contexts. Illumination of role of media in forming and expressing religious ideas, practices, and identities. Topics may include representations of religious groups, visual and aural piety, identity formation, interreligious conflict, religious education, and use of media technologies for propaganda or proselytizing purposes. Historical, sociological, and anthropological approaches used in concert with various methodologies current within media studies.

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COURSE: COM LIT 1E
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing Requirement.

Study of social media as platform for storytelling, with core focus on three distinct cultures: U.S., China, and Russia. History, form, and various functions of social media. Examination of how we tell stories about ourselves and how we interpret digital narratives we see, hear, or read from organizations near and far. Analysis of networked narratives encountered online.

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COURSE: COMM M147
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Studies in relationship between mass communication and social organization. Topics include history and organization of major media institutions, social forces that shape production of mass media news and entertainment, selected studies in media content, and effects of media on society.

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COURSE: MGMT 180
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Topics of special interest to undergraduate students. Specific subjects may vary each term depending on particular interest of instructors or students. Focus on proven methods for succeeding in one-on-one interactions, small groups, and large audiences. Topics include accelerating trust and rapport, best question-asking strategies, executive communication skills, strengthening leadership presence, strengthening one’s relationships, network and reputation, and staying poised under pressure.

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COURSE: MUSC 7
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Musical experience helpful, but not required. Brief historical survey of film music, with strong emphasis on recent development: Japanese animation, advertising, and MTV, as well as computer tools and digital scoring methods. Designed to inspire and inform those interested in movie music.

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COURSE: COMM 114
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Explanation of types of communication that occur in close relationships, especially romantic relationships. In-depth coverage of variety of relationship topics, including intimacy, stages of intimate relationships, why we choose to get involved with some people as opposed to others, flirting, and self-disclosure.

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COURSE: GENDER M111
CREDITS: 5 Units

Historical issues and critical approaches to women and cinema that may include authorship, stardom, female genres, and images of women in Hollywood cinema, alternative cinema, and independent cinema from silent era to present.

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COURSE: CHICANO 180
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Overview of Chicana/Chicano schooling issues in U.S., with special emphasis on several important historical events that exemplify struggle for educational justice and equity that affected Chicana/Chicano education–Mendez versus Westminster (1947) desegregation case and 1968 high school Chicana/Chicano student walkouts. Through oral history projects, documentation of legacy of Sylvia Mendez, who experienced segregation in one Mexican school in 1940s, Sal Castro, Chicano teacher and central figure in 1968 walkouts, and Chicano Youth Leadership Conference (CYLC). Examination of how historical, social, and political forces have impacted Chicana/Chicano educational experiences.

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COURSE: EDUC 120
CREDITS: 5 Units

Seminar, four hours. Development of positive social behaviors and their enhancement. Broad overview of children’s psychological development, with emphasis on personal, social, and emotional attributes of preschool and elementary school child. Aspects of prosocial behavior and aggression. Enhancement of prosocial behavior and modification of such negative behaviors as aggression. Review and evaluation of contemporary educational programs for promoting positive social behaviors in elementary schools. Methodological aspects of child development. Overview of early childhood education and issues related to role of family, school, and television in child development.

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COURSE: EDUC 129
CREDITS: 5 Units

Seminar, four hours. Research seminar providing overview of high-profile legal controversies that shape so many policy debates at both K-12 and higher education levels. Major areas of focus include campus safety, religion and schools, educational quality and law, broad based right to equal educational opportunity, and Internet-related issues and concerns.

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COURSE: APPLING 101W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36.

Exploration of skills and conditions involved in successful second and foreign language learning; application of this knowledge in development of framework for teaching second and foreign languages.  

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COURSE: CHICANO M102
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Theoretical and empirical overview of Chicana/Chicano educational issues in U.S., with special emphasis on disentangling effects of race, gender, class, and immigrant status on Chicana/Chicano educational attainment and achievement. Examination of how historical, social, political, and economic forces impact Chicana/Chicano educational experience.

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COURSE: WL ARTS M79
CREDITS: 5 Units

Examination of issues of environmental and public health effects of intensive and extensive agriculture, influence of corporations on government, animal ethics, food deserts and urban gardening, and food insecurity. Focus on representation of such issues in documentaries, public lectures, memoirs, novels, and visual art, as well as on initiatives to address such problems through policy and activism.

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COURSE: NURSING 50
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Epidemiology is interdisciplinary science with goal of identifying and describing patterns of disease occurrence, identifying determinants of disease, and evaluating disease prevention and health care treatment efforts. With its focus on human populations, epidemiology is directly linked with public health research, policy, and practice. Introduction to fundamental definitions, concepts, methods, and critical thinking used in epidemiologic study. Designed to lay foundation for future study to evaluate factors related to health outcomes in human populations using epidemiologic principles.

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COURSE: ENVIRON 25
CREDITS: 5 Units

Good food is healthy, sustainably produced, and culturally meaningful. Introduction to basic concepts and history of food systems, food science and nutrition, fair and sustainable food production, natural resources and environmental issues including climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and food policy and law, food distribution and access, cultural identity and artistic engagements with food.

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COURSE: GEOG 125
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Impact of environment and lifestyle on individual health examined from geographical perspective, with examples from both developed and developing countries.

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COURSE: CHICANO CM106 / PUB HLT M106
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of Chicano/Latino health status through life expectancy, causes of death, reportable diseases, services utilization, provider supply, and risk behaviors within demographic/immigration changes. Binational review of health effects in U.S. and Mexico.

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COURSE: HIST 179B
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Cultural, scientific, and social context that shaped modern medicine from Renaissance to Romantic era. Topics include establishment of anatomy, physiology, and modern clinical medicine, mapping of human body, medical approach to mental illness, rise of anatomo-clinical method at Paris School.

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COURSE: COM HLT 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Limited to students in Public Health minor and graduate students.

Introductory course to provide non-Community Health Sciences M.P.H. students and qualified undergraduate students with broad and comprehensive overview of concepts, empirical research, and public health practice in community health sciences, with emphasis on social context and determinants of population health and principles of planning interventions to protect and improve public health. Ways to define and measure health and illness, social construction of illness, social and behavioral determinants of health, and health disparities, including socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, gender, and age. Social and behavioral theories of health-related behavior change, health promotion strategies and methods, and public policy. Case studies of evidence-based health promotion programs provided.

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COURSE: HLT POL 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Structure and function of American healthcare system; issues and forces shaping its future.

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COURSE: PSYCH 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Areas of health, illness, treatment, and delivery of treatment that can be elucidated by understanding of psychological concepts and research, psychological perspective on these problems, and how psychological perspective might be enlarged and extended in medical area.

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COURSE: NURSING 13
CREDITS: 5 Units

Structural presentation of human body, including musculoskeletal, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive systems. Laboratory uses virtual cadaver dissection and examination.

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COURSE: DIS STD M139 / PSYCH M139
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Genealogy of autism as diagnostic category and cultural phenomenon from its historical roots as new, rare, and obscure condition in early 1940s to its current contested status as minority identity and/or global epidemic. Examination of material sourced from various fields and disciplines invested in autism, including psychology, neuroscience, arts and humanities, popular media, anthropology, activism, and critical autism studies. Students encounter and analyze multiple perspectives on autism and put them in conversation with one another. Attention paid to way people on spectrum define, explain, and represent their own experiences of autism and discussion of what ramifications of these multiple framings are in context of autism intervention strategy and disability policy today.

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COURSE: MUSC 188
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of young but quickly growing profession of music therapy in health care industry. Students gain comprehensive understanding of music therapy, what it takes to become board-certified music therapist, and standards of practice and research. Students gain ability to define music therapy and advocate its services within community, and general understanding of how to assess and carry out music therapy session. Students participate in classroom activities that include simple songwriting, lyric analysis, instrumentation, and discussion. Prior music training not required. Includes homework, research assignments, and quizzes. In final group project, students work together to assess hypothetical client and create two session plans with clearly stated objectives.

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COURSE: DIS STD M161 / GENDER M161
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Since creation of International Olympic Committee in 1894, athletes with disabilities have had, and been denied, formal opportunities to compete with able-bodied athletes. Overview of some major topics of discussion concerning intersections of athletic competition and disability, addressing variety of perspectives and themes on disability and sport, such as passing, sports integration, competition versus charity, and masculinity. Sources include readings, film, television, and biographical writings that address sports, body and disability generally, and Special Olympics specifically.

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COURSE: DANCE 11
CREDITS: 2 Units

Beginning-level study of yoga.

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COURSE: RELIGN M132
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to religious beliefs, practices, and sentiments of ancient Egypt to study Egyptian religion as coherent system of thought and sphere of action that once served as meaningful and relevant framework for understanding physical reality and human life for inhabitants of Nile Valley. General principles as well as developments through time (circa 3000 BC to 300 CE). Topics include mythology, temple and cult, magic, and personal piety.

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COURSE: ART HIS M110A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Study of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts during Predynastic period and Old Kingdom. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

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COURSE: HIST 191C
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Survey of backgrounds, campaigns, and aftermath of this most lethal of all wars in human history–one that victors fought as moral imperative against Axis powers. Flawed Versailles peace of 1919 that ended World War I is starting point for inquiry. Inter-war malaise of Democracies and appeasement together led to outbreak of world war in 1930s, first in China, then in Poland/Western Europe. Student presentations serve as backdrop for identification of turning points of so-called good war itself, World War II. Survey of growing tensions among victors that produced ensuing epoch known as Cold War.

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COURSE: COMM 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Course 10 or Linguistics 1 or Sociology 1 or Psychology 10.

Analysis of fundamental nature of human communication; its physical, linguistic, psychological, and sociological bases. Study of theoretical models explicating process and constituents of communicative act.

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COURSE: ENGL 4W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36.

Introduction to literary analysis, with close reading and carefully written exposition of selections from principal modes of literature: poetry, prose fiction, and drama. Minimum of 15 to 20 pages of revised writing.

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COURSE: ENGL 9115D
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H.

Study of British and American detective fiction and literature of detection.

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COURSE: CLASSIC 20
CREDITS: 5 Units

Study of Roman life and culture from time of city’s legendary foundations to end of classical antiquity. Readings focus on selections from works of ancient authors in translation. Lectures illustrated with images of art, architecture, and material culture. Knowledge of Latin not required.

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COURSE: HIST 134C
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Changing European economy after World War I and II and in 1990s; impact of fourth and fifth Industrial Revolutions; Great Depressions of century during 1930s, 1970s, and 1980s; and changing modernization strategies; import-substituting industrialization in peripheries; Soviet modernization dictatorship in East Central Europe and its collapse; integration process of second half of century and rise of European Union; modernization model at end of century.

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COURSE: FRNCH 1
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Contact CISaustralia for course description.

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COURSE: ENGCOMP 3
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing Requirement.

Rhetorical techniques and skillful argument. Analysis of varieties of academic prose and writing of minimum of 20 pages of revised text.

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COURSE: GERMAN 56
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to strains of German philosophy and political thought that focus on cosmopolitanism. Exploration of different historical and philosophical engagements with cosmopolitan projects.

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COURSE: FRNCH 41
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to French culture and literature through study of films of cultural and literary significance.  

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COURSE: ARCH&UD 10B
CREDITS: 5 Units

Survey of architectural and urban history from 1600 to present in global context. Exploration of buildings, cities, spaces, artifacts, landscapes, and ideas through their relation to geopolitical conditions and through their relation to theories of design.

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COURSE: ASIA AM 10
CREDITS: 5 Units

Multidisciplinary examination of history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in U.S.

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COURSE: HIST 154
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Economic, social, intellectual, and political development of California from earliest times to present.

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COURSE: HIST 179B
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Cultural, scientific, and social context that shaped modern medicine from Renaissance to Romantic era. Topics include establishment of anatomy, physiology, and modern clinical medicine, mapping of human body, medical approach to mental illness, rise of anatomo-clinical method at Paris School.

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COURSE: HIST 5
CREDITS: 5 Units

Holocaust, murder of six million Jews by Germans in Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II, is one of crucial events of modern history. Examination of origins of Holocaust, perpetrators and victims, and changing efforts to come to terms with this genocide. Exploration of forces that led to Holocaust, including emergence of scientific racism, anti-Semitism, and machinery of modern state. Consideration of debates about implementation of genocide, including significance of gender and sexuality, relationship between war and genocide, meanings of resistance and culpability, and political and philosophical implications of Holocaust. Exploration of how genocide of European Jewry was intertwined with targeting of other victims of Nazi rule, including Roma, Slavs, black Germans, disabled, homosexuals, and political opponents of National Socialism.

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COURSE: ENGL 139
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3.

Specialized study of work of one single Anglophone poet, dramatist, prose writer, or novelist. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

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COURSE: LING 102
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Linguistics 20 with a grade of B- or better.

Not open for credit to students with credit for course 103. Basics of articulation and acoustics of phonetic categories used in world’s languages, including English in comparison with other languages. Practice in speech-sound perception and transcription using International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Applications to language learning/teaching and other fields.

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COURSE: ASIAN M60W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36.

Knowledge of Asian languages not required. General survey of Buddhist worldview and lifestyle, with focus on those religious doctrines and meditative practices most essential to various Asian traditions of Buddhism. Particular attention to problems involved in study of religion.  

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COURSE: CHICANO 10A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Interdisciplinary survey of diverse historical experiences, cultural factors, and ethnic/racial paradigms, including indigenousness, gender, sexuality, language, and borders, that help shape Chicana/Chicano identities. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills.

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COURSE: CHIN C120
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Recommended preparation: one to two years of college-level Chinese. Introduction to Chinese sound system, writing system and its reform, regional differences, major structural features, language in society and in cultural practices.

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COURSE: RELIGN M60B
CREDITS: 5 Units

Knowledge of Chinese not required. General survey of religious life in China, with emphasis on everyday religious practice over doctrine, and themes common to Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism.

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COURSE: ENGL 20W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing Requirement.

Designed to introduce fundamentals of creative writing and writing workshop experience. Emphasis on poetry, fiction, drama, or creative nonfiction depending on wishes of instructor(s) during any given term. Readings from assigned texts, weekly writing assignments (multiple drafts and revisions), and final portfolio required. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 20.

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COURSE: PHILOS 22
CREDITS: 5 Units

Systematic introduction to ethical theory, including discussion of egoism, utilitarianism, justice, responsibility, meaning of ethical terms, relativism, etc.

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COURSE: HIST 97M
CREDITS: 5 Units

Southeast Asia region is made up of 11 modern nation-states that encompass amazing diversities. As such, its histories reflect these diversities; and writing of those histories involves and includes variety of views and approaches. As it is with writing history of any people, there are competing interpretations. In Southeast Asian histories, among areas of conflicting views are history from below versus from above; those of colonial powers versus those of colonized peoples; peasants versus elites; nationalist versus anticolonialist movements; and many more. Dichotomies are not always so marked–there can be nuanced differences. Introduction to historical practice through cross-section and overview of Southeast Asian historiography, and examination of competing visions of various aspects of Southeast Asian history.

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COURSE: ISLM ST M20 / RELIGN M20
CREDITS: 5 Units

Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism.

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COURSE: APPLING 101W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36.

Exploration of skills and conditions involved in successful second and foreign language learning; application of this knowledge in development of framework for teaching second and foreign languages.  

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COURSE: LING 20
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to theory and methods of linguistics: universal properties of human language; phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic structures and analysis; nature and form of grammar.

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COURSE: PHILOS 7
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introductory study of philosophical issues about nature of the mind and its relation to the body, including materialism, functionalism, behaviorism, determinism and free will, nature of psychological knowledge.

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COURSE: PHILOS 6
CREDITS: 5 Units

Study of some classical or contemporary works in political philosophy. Questions that may be discussed include What is justice? Why obey the law? Which form of government is best? How much personal freedom should be allowed in society?

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COURSE: LING 1
CREDITS: 5 Units

Summary, for general undergraduates, of what is known about human language; unique nature of human language, its structure, its universality, and its diversity; language in its social and cultural setting; language in relation to other aspects of human inquiry and knowledge.

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COURSE: HIST 1B
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to history of the West and its connections to rest of world from 843 to 1715. Profound social, political, cultural, and intellectual changes that affected development of modern world. Topics covered include economic, social, and cultural aspects of feudal system; relationship between Church and empire; new religious movements (including the Reformation); formation of nation-states; relationship between Western Europe and non-European and non-Christian people and traditions.

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COURSE: ETHNMUS 50A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Survey of development of jazz in American culture. Discussion of different compositional/performance techniques and approaches that distinguish different sub-styles of jazz from one another, as well as key historical figures that shaped development of jazz from its early years through modern jazz. Important historical social issues (segregation, Depression, World War II, Civil Rights Movement) that intersect with history of U.S. and jazz music.

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COURSE: LING 132
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Linguistics 20, 119A or 120A, 119B or 120B.

Central issues in language comprehension and production, with emphasis on how theories in linguistics inform processing models. Topics include word understanding (with emphasis on spoken language), parsing, anaphora and inferencing, speech error models of sentence production, and computation of syntactic structure during production.  

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COURSE: APPLING 40W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36.

Prior knowledge of foreign languages not required. Introduction to language from sociological perspective of gender. Use of research and examples in English and other languages to explore nature of male and female “genderlects” and gendered language, as reflected in lexicon, language behavior, phonetics and intonation, and language acquisition and linguistic change.

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COURSE: ANTHRO 153
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Language as social phenomenon. Introduction to several angles from which language use can be critically examined as integral to interactions between individuals and between social groups. P/NP or letter grading.

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COURSE: APPLING 30W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of range of topics related to study of language and social interaction in both mundane and professional settings, particularly how language affects social lives and how social organization affects use of language. Topics include different approaches to study of language in social interaction (theories and research methodologies), issues regarding language and social identity (such as socioeconomic status, race, gender, and situational identity), and issues concerning language and culture (such as cross-cultural misunderstanding and language socialization). Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

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COURSE: CHICANO M124
CREDITS: 5 Units

Overview of Mexican, Central American, and Latina/Latino immigration to U.S., examining social, political, and economic contexts out of which different waves of Latin American immigration have occurred.

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COURSE: ENGL 119
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H.

Exploration of place of literary imagination in making of cities, with focus on questions of cultural exchange, development, migration, urban rebellion, and style. Topics may include meaning of urban space and time, city as urban village or cosmopolitan hub, segregated dystopia or postmodern future, and impact of exile, tourism, and migration in making of cities. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

Examination–through poetry, novels, stories, music, and film–New York underground, whether that be of avant-garde artists, people living on edge of respectability (such as hustlers or punks), or people otherwise marginalized by dominant cultural norms. Students read stories and watch feature films that depict this underground; but also look at material produced by artists that challenged cultural and aesthetic norms. Writers and artists include Glenn Branca, Frank O’Hara, Martin Scorsese, Patti Smith, Andy Warhol, David Wojnarowicz, and many others.

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COURSE: COM LIT 4DW
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36.

Study and discussion of major literary texts usually overlooked in courses that focus only on canon of Western literature, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts from at least three of following areas read in any given term: African, Caribbean, East Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern literature. Texts may include works by authors such as Ngugi, Desai, Kincaid, Emecheta, El Saadawi, Achebe, Pak, Can Xue, Neruda, and Rushdie. Satisfies Writing II requirement.

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COURSE: PHILOS 31
CREDITS: 5 Units

Recommended for students who plan to pursue more advanced studies in logic. Elements of symbolic logic, sentential and quantificational; forms of reasoning and structure of language.

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COURSE: ART HIS 154D
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of developments in painting, sculpture, photography, film, museums, and exhibitionary culture across Indian subcontinent from 1850 to 2000. This dynamic period saw rise and fall of colonial empires; emergence of nationalism(s); global conflict; and crises of territory, migration, and displacement in South Asia. Topics examined include artistic responses to empire and colonial patronage, relationship of modern art practices to notions of indigeneity, tradition and subaltern, and aesthetic cultures of nation-building in India and Pakistan.

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COURSE: CLASSIC 185
CREDITS: 5 Units

Origins and nature of English vocabulary, from Proto-Indo-European prehistory to current slang. Topics include Greek and Latin component in English (including technical terminology), alphabet and English spelling, semantic change and word formation, vocabulary in literature and film.

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COURSE: PHILOS 166
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination, through study of recent philosophical writings, of such topics as nature of law, relationship of law and morals, legal reasoning, punishment, and obligation to obey law.

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COURSE: PHILOS 129
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Preparation: one 4-unit psychology course, one philosophy course. Selected philosophical issues arising from psychological theories. Nature of perception and issues about perceptual psychology and development of important types of representation (e.g., of body, cause, agency) in early childhood. Relevance of computer simulation to accounts of thinking and meaning; relations between semantical theory and learning theory; psychological aspects of theory of syntax.

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COURSE: LING 120A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Linguistics 20, Linguistics 103.

Introduction to phonological theory and analysis. Rules, representations, underlying forms, derivations. Justification of phonological analyses. Emphasis on practical skills with problem sets.

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COURSE: ANTHRO 110
CREDITS: 5 Units

Intended for students interested in conceptual structure of scientific archaeology. Archaeological method and theory with emphasis on what archaeologists do and how and why they do it. Consideration of field strategies, formation processes, chronological frameworks, and other crucial principles of archaeological analysis and interpretation. P/NP or letter grading.

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COURSE: RELIGN M108
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to Quran, its early history, and form and function as scripture in Muslim history, civilization, and culture. Focus also on Quranic interpretation, its relationship to Islamic law, and Quran in contemporary discourses such as human rights, feminism, and contemporary reform movements. Primary sources include excerpts from Quran, Quranic interpretation, and selected writings of Muslim thinkers and reformists. Strong focus on analytical and writing skills through in-class assignments and discussion.

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COURSE: RELIGN 11
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to varieties of religious experience in Los Angeles and its environs. Presentations, required readings, and (where possible) site visits to examine selected faiths and spiritual practices throughout Southern California and provide deeper understanding of myriad ways that sacred is made manifest and encountered. Foundational academic orientations within study of religion (anthropological, historical, psychological, sociological, etc.) used as framework to examine and interpret almost unparalleled religious diversity of City of Angels. Recognizing that spiritual traditions are crucial reflection of region’s ever-changing demographics, emphasis on role of ethnicity, gender, nationality, and race in shaping of religious landscape.

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COURSE: RELIGN 160
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of complex relationship between religious traditions and various media (e.g., print, film, photography, television, radio, and electronic) as they have intersected in specific historical and cultural contexts. Illumination of role of media in forming and expressing religious ideas, practices, and identities. Topics may include representations of religious groups, visual and aural piety, identity formation, interreligious conflict, religious education, and use of media technologies for propaganda or proselytizing purposes. Historical, sociological, and anthropological approaches used in concert with various methodologies current within media studies.

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COURSE: ENGL 115E
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H.

Study of science fiction and speculative literatures.

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COURSE: ART HIS 132
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Course 23

Changing topics in contemporary art (post-1945) that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members.

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COURSE: ART HIS C126
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Period between 1300 and 1700 witnessed advent of technologies that democratized knowledge and experience (print); new doctrines concerning individual’s direct experience of God (Lutheranism); and reformulations of identity, prompted by overseas voyages to previously unknown lands inhabited by previously unknown peoples. These transformations refashioned how art was produced and perceived, and in certain cases were by-products of innovations that originated within artistic practice. Introduction to some of new ideas, mediums, genres, confessional identities, techniques, and materials that emerged in northern Europe between 14th and 17th centuries.

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COURSE: ENGL 90
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing Requirement.

Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B.

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COURSE: GENDER M107A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Focus on women writers that may include historical, regional, national, or thematic emphasis, with possible topics such as authorship, self-writing, sexuality, gender, and genre. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

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COURSE: ENGL M138
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introductory workshop in genre(s) of instructor choice, that may include mixed genres, playwriting, screenwriting, literary nonfiction, or others. Enrollment in more than one section per term not permitted. May be repeated for maximum of 10 units. May not be used to satisfy workshop requirements for English creative writing concentration.

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COURSE: GENDER M110C / PHILOS M187
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Gender studies 10 or one philosophy course.

Examination in depth of different theoretical positions on gender and women as they have been applied to study of philosophy. Emphasis on theoretical contributions made by new scholarship on women in philosophy. Critical study of concepts and principles that arise in discussion of women’s rights and liberation. Philosophical approach to feminist theories. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

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COURSE: PHILOS C119
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Study of selected philosophers or themes in history of philosophy from different periods (e.g. ancient and medieval, medieval and early modern).

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COURSE: HIST 119D
CREDITS: 5 Units

Special topics in history of Middle Ages, including religion in society, justice and law, politics of war and diplomacy, economic upheaval and renewal, and cultural representations. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change.

Middle Ages played critical role in construction of modern Western sexual and gender identities, as well as its conception of love and romance. Through close reading of primary sources, exploration of treatment of sex and sexuality in Middle Ages. Topics include love and romance, gender relations, homosexuality, marriage and adultery, gynecology and medicine, prostitution, masturbation, sexual deviancy, and eroticism.

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COURSE: GENDER 101W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Development of critical reading and writing skills necessary for academic success. Students engage assigned readings in conversation with week’s leading question. Generation and continuous development of paper topic as result of in-class discussions and formal writing exercises. Small writing groups assist students in understanding relationship between how written thoughts are presented and how they are comprehended by different readers. Students gain understanding of writing process, including topic conceptualization, objective of writing project, organization of thoughts and resources, selection of objects of study, personal writing style, etc.

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COURSE: PSYCH 127A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Study of psychological disorders (e.g., depression, anxiety, substance use disorders, schizophrenia) across lifespan, including role of biological, behavioral, social, cognitive, and cultural factors, diagnosis and treatment approaches. Discussion of Stigma and practices that support inclusiveness.

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 10. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 127B or 127C.

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COURSE: ASIA AM 50W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Overview of history of feminist theory and intersection of gender, class, race/ethnicity from cross-cultural perspectives, with focus on Asian American women’s lived experiences in U.S. Topics include Asian American women’s roles in family life, work, community organization, social change, and cultural creativity. Examination of broader structural forces that affect women in society, such as racialization, immigration, global capitalism, colonialism and post-colonialism, and social movements.

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COURSE: COMM 157
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Analysis of how following personal lives of media-created celebrities impacts self-esteem, connectedness, and personal relationships from cultural studies and social sciences perspectives, and how entities cultivate celebrity for financial gain. Topics include celebrity gossip and privacy, news sharing, public relations, and impact of social media on fan support, image construction, and damage control.

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COURSE: CHICANO 180
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Overview of Chicana/Chicano schooling issues in U.S., with special emphasis on several important historical events that exemplify struggle for educational justice and equity that affected Chicana/Chicano education–Mendez versus Westminster (1947) desegregation case and 1968 high school Chicana/Chicano student walkouts. Through oral history projects, documentation of legacy of Sylvia Mendez, who experienced segregation in one Mexican school in 1940s, Sal Castro, Chicano teacher and central figure in 1968 walkouts, and Chicano Youth Leadership Conference (CYLC). Examination of how historical, social, and political forces have impacted Chicana/Chicano educational experiences.

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COURSE: PSYCH 118
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Survey of determinants of species-specific behavior, including genetic influences and learning.

Requisite: course 115. Designed for junior/senior majors.

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COURSE: M107
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to development of rap music and hip-hop culture, with emphasis on musical and verbal qualities, philosophical and political ideologies, gender representation, and influences on cinema and popular culture. P/NP or letter grading.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 134
CREDITS: 5 Units

Theories of relation of variations in personality to culture and group life, in primitive and modern societies, and influence of social role on behavior.

Designed for juniors/seniors.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 101
CREDITS: 5 Units

Comparative survey of basic concepts and theories in sociology from 1850 to 1920.

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COURSE: CHICANO M106B / GENDER M104C / SOL WLF M104C
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of complexity of variables related to diversity of aging population and variability in aging process. Examination of gender and ethnicity within context of both physical and social aging, in multidisciplinary perspective utilizing faculty from variety of fields to address issues of diversity.

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COURSE: EDUC 120
CREDITS: 5 Units

Seminar, four hours. Development of positive social behaviors and their enhancement. Broad overview of children’s psychological development, with emphasis on personal, social, and emotional attributes of preschool and elementary school child. Aspects of prosocial behavior and aggression. Enhancement of prosocial behavior and modification of such negative behaviors as aggression. Review and evaluation of contemporary educational programs for promoting positive social behaviors in elementary schools. Methodological aspects of child development. Overview of early childhood education and issues related to role of family, school, and television in child development.

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COURSE: INTL DV 110
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Broad introduction to theoretical traditions in development studies, with focus on interactions between states, markets, and cultural value systems, with selected case studies in developing nations.

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COURSE: ENVIRON M164 / URBN PL M160
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Environmental planning is more than simply finding problems and fixing them. Each policy must be negotiated and implemented within multiple, complex systems of governance. Institutions and politics matter deeply. Overview of how environmental governance works in practice and how it might be improved.  

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COURSE: ANTHRO 124S
CREDITS: 5 Units

Examination of human sexual relations and social behavior from evolutionary perspective. Emphasis on theories and evidence for differences between men and women in their patterns of growth, maturation, fertility, mortality, parenting, and relations with members of opposite sex. P/NP or letter grading.

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COURSE: DIS STD M125 / LGBTQS M125
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of identity as means of understanding cultural formations, dominant/non-dominant power dynamics, and systems of visual representation. Intersectional approach to explore how ability and sexuality intersect, overlap, and change notions of identity. Use of scholarly texts from disability studies, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender studies, popular culture, performance, and film to investigate factors that shape ability and sexuality as basis for identity. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

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COURSE: WL ARTS M79
CREDITS: 5 Units

Examination of issues of environmental and public health effects of intensive and extensive agriculture, influence of corporations on government, animal ethics, food deserts and urban gardening, and food insecurity. Focus on representation of such issues in documentaries, public lectures, memoirs, novels, and visual art, as well as on initiatives to address such problems through policy and activism.

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COURSE: POL SCI 154B
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Comparative study of governmental and political development, organization, and practices.

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COURSE: ASIA AM 10
CREDITS: 5 Units

Multidisciplinary examination of history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in U.S.

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COURSE: PUB AFF 80
CREDITS: 5 Units

Overview of major theoretical, conceptual, and empirical traditions in study of human development. Exploration of how diverse cultural, social, socioeconomic, and historical contexts interact with biological, cognitive, and psychological processes to affect individuals during key developmental periods (such as early childhood, childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, and late adulthood). Topics may include historical changes in families, schools, neighborhoods, and workplace; economic conditions of families, schools, and neighborhoods; enduring effects of childhood on adult well-being; and impact of ascribed characteristics such as gender, race, and nationality on individuals’ environments, pathways, and outcomes.

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COURSE: POL SCI 135
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Relations of China with its neighbors and other powers, with emphasis on contemporary interests and policies of China vis-à-vis U.S.

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COURSE: PSYCH 137C
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to how social scientists think about, study, and treat intimate relationships, with emphasis on understanding how relationships change over time. Topics include attraction, relationship formation, conflict resolution, social support, sex, role of individual differences, and external circumstances.

Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Limited to juniors/seniors.

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COURSE: POL SCI 40
CREDITS: 5 Units

Basic institutions and processes of democratic politics. Treatment of themes such as constitutionalism, representation, participation, and leadership coupled with particular emphasis on the American case.

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COURSE: CHICANO 10A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Interdisciplinary survey of diverse historical experiences, cultural factors, and ethnic/racial paradigms, including indigenousness, gender, sexuality, language, and borders, that help shape Chicana/Chicano identities. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills.

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COURSE: URBN PL 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Survey of urban history and evolution in U.S., urban social theory, current growth trends, system of cities, urban economy and economic restructuring, traditional and alternative location theories, urban transportation, and residential location and segregation.

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COURSE: GENDER 10
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to key concepts in study of sex and gender. Exploration of topics such as gender socialization, body image, sexualities, masculinities, and women’s subordination. Special emphasis on interaction of gender with other identity markers such as race, nation, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and other differences.

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COURSE: PSYCH 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Areas of health, illness, treatment, and delivery of treatment that can be elucidated by understanding of psychological concepts and research, psychological perspective on these problems, and how psychological perspective might be enlarged and extended in medical area.

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COURSE: INTL DV 1
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of historical and contemporary context of socioeconomic inequalities between Global South and Global North. Focus on cultural, political, and economic realities of developing world, which includes countries of Asia, eastern Europe, Africa, Middle East, and Latin America.

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COURSE: I A STD 1
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to international and area studies from interdisciplinary framework, covering themes related to international politics and markets, as well as international societies and cultures, to illuminate and clarify profoundly international character of world we live in and to introduce set of contemporary issues and challenges that cross borders and affect every region of world.

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COURSE: LBR&WS 10
CREDITS: 5 Units

Assumptions about work, including why some work is favored, whether those with good jobs really are better people than those without, and how this understanding of work and value came to be common sense. Unpacking of these and other assumptions about work, value, and power, with focus on low-wage workers, their communities, and their place in contemporary society.  

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COURSE: GENDER M114 / LGBTQS M114
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to history, politics, culture, and scientific study of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgendered, and queer people; examination of sexuality and gender as categories for investigation; interdisciplinary theories and research on minority sexualities and genders.

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COURSE: PHILOS 7
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introductory study of philosophical issues about nature of the mind and its relation to the body, including materialism, functionalism, behaviorism, determinism and free will, nature of psychological knowledge.

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COURSE: PHILOS 6
CREDITS: 5 Units

Study of some classical or contemporary works in political philosophy. Questions that may be discussed include What is justice? Why obey the law? Which form of government is best? How much personal freedom should be allowed in society?

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COURSE: POL SCI 10
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exposition and analysis of selected political theorists and concepts from Plato to the present.

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COURSE: PUB PLC 10A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Overview of principal topics of contemporary policy analysis, developing their applications with examples from instructor’s own research, visitors, small student projects, or field trips.

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COURSE: SOL WLF 100A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Origin and development of major U.S. social welfare programs and policies guiding them, with emphasis on analysis of policy developments/issues related to provision of social welfare services. Study of historical and current responses of profession to major social problems.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 20
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to methods used in contemporary sociological research, with focus on issues of research design, data collection, and analysis of data.

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COURSE: I A STD 31
CREDITS: 5 Units

Interdisciplinary survey designed as introduction to modern Southeast Asia.

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COURSE: PSYCH 15
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Designed for non majors. Survey of genetic, evolutionary, physiological, pharmacological, and experiential factors affecting behavior. Using comparative approach where appropriate, emphasis on relevance of biological mechanisms to understanding of humans and their interaction with their environment.

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COURSE: PSYCH 10
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Lecture, four hours. General introduction including topics in cognitive, experimental, personality, developmental, social, and clinical psychology; six hours of psychological research and a grade of C or better required of all departmental premajors.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 1
CREDITS: 5 Units

Survey of characteristics of social life, processes of social interaction, and tools of sociological investigation.

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COURSE: URBN PL M140
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of key issues (work, housing, and neighborhoods) in urban poverty, with particular focus on Mexican and Central American immigrant populations in Los Angeles. Exploration of major theoretical models that explain urban poverty and application of them in comparative context while exploring differences between Mexican and Central American immigrants. Social conditions and forces that help us understand lives of poor people in comparative context while looking at differences between two major Latino-origin populations in Los Angeles. Critical analysis of new forms of urban poverty in contemporary American society.

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COURSE: GENDER 103
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of social production of knowledge about gendered subjects and gender systems. Students engage key issues in feminist theory and feminist epistemology. How do feminist scholars identify and frame research questions? How is knowledge about marginalized subjects produced? How has feminism challenged dominant understandings of knowledge, rationality, objectivity, and scientific method? How have social movements sought to challenge traditional modes of knowledge production?

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COURSE: APPLING 40W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36.

Prior knowledge of foreign languages not required. Introduction to language from sociological perspective of gender. Use of research and examples in English and other languages to explore nature of male and female “genderlects” and gendered language, as reflected in lexicon, language behavior, phonetics and intonation, and language acquisition and linguistic change.

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COURSE: ANTHRO 153
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Language as social phenomenon. Introduction to several angles from which language use can be critically examined as integral to interactions between individuals and between social groups. P/NP or letter grading.

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COURSE: APPLING 30W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of range of topics related to study of language and social interaction in both mundane and professional settings, particularly how language affects social lives and how social organization affects use of language. Topics include different approaches to study of language in social interaction (theories and research methodologies), issues regarding language and social identity (such as socioeconomic status, race, gender, and situational identity), and issues concerning language and culture (such as cross-cultural misunderstanding and language socialization). Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

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COURSE: CHICANO M124
CREDITS: 5 Units

Overview of Mexican, Central American, and Latina/Latino immigration to U.S., examining social, political, and economic contexts out of which different waves of Latin American immigration have occurred.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 169
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Specific topics may include law in preindustrial and industrialized societies, legalization of contemporary social relations, participants’ experiences of legal processes, lay perceptions of justice, social movements toward equal justice, roles of lawyers and judges, social impact of court decisions.

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COURSE: CHICANO M102
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Theoretical and empirical overview of Chicana/Chicano educational issues in U.S., with special emphasis on disentangling effects of race, gender, class, and immigrant status on Chicana/Chicano educational attainment and achievement. Examination of how historical, social, political, and economic forces impact Chicana/Chicano educational experience.

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COURSE: PSYCTRY 175
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Designed for beginners; prior experience with meditation not required. Introduction to mindfulness, including basic mindfulness meditation practices, both sitting and moving, ways to deepen positive emotions like gratitude, kindness, and joy, and methods for integrating more awareness and creativity into ordinary activities. Examination of varying meditative traditions as well as emerging science on beneficial effects of mindfulness practice for mental and physical health. Beneficial effects include reduced stress, improved attention, reduced emotional reactivity, and greater mind-body awareness. Learning and development of practical skills of relational mindfulness in interactions with others.

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COURSE: PSYCTRY M182
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Basic overview of brain function and consideration of some management methods that exist already, and what future may hold. New methods for predicting our own futures and modeling what if scenarios that might alter risks and benefits of different courses of action, based on individual genetic background and other elements of personal history and environmental exposures. Introduction to key principles from science of behavior change, illustrating how important health-related behavioral habits are and how difficult these can be to change and why. Coverage of series of topics that center on personal enhancement of well-being through consideration of stress management, long-term goal and value identification, mapping of long-term goals onto immediate actions, reinforcement learning, meditation, neurofeedback, and time management. Critical appraisal of tools to help students distinguish scientifically validated procedures.

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COURSE: DIS STD M139 / PSYCH M139
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Genealogy of autism as diagnostic category and cultural phenomenon from its historical roots as new, rare, and obscure condition in early 1940s to its current contested status as minority identity and/or global epidemic. Examination of material sourced from various fields and disciplines invested in autism, including psychology, neuroscience, arts and humanities, popular media, anthropology, activism, and critical autism studies. Students encounter and analyze multiple perspectives on autism and put them in conversation with one another. Attention paid to way people on spectrum define, explain, and represent their own experiences of autism and discussion of what ramifications of these multiple framings are in context of autism intervention strategy and disability policy today.

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COURSE: DIS STD 101W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Creation of critical framework for understanding concept of disability from sampling of disciplinary perspectives. Organized around productive and central tension in disability studies–between disability as lived subjective experience that is both individual and communal, and disability as objective, medical, legal, and sometimes stigmatized category. Students encouraged to make connections between units and to create their own perspectives on disability in field that defines itself by how it changes. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 101.

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COURSE: PHILOS 129
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Preparation: one 4-unit psychology course, one philosophy course. Selected philosophical issues arising from psychological theories. Nature of perception and issues about perceptual psychology and development of important types of representation (e.g., of body, cause, agency) in early childhood. Relevance of computer simulation to accounts of thinking and meaning; relations between semantical theory and learning theory; psychological aspects of theory of syntax.

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COURSE: URBN PL 141
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Overview of planning history, theory, and contemporary issues that affect low-income communities, communities of color, and underserved neighborhoods, particularly in Los Angeles area. Field of planning offers distinct perspectives and opportunities for improving vulnerable communities. Topics range from discussion of intersection between race and income, critical race theory, community development, residential segregation, spatial mismatch, and environmental justice to social justice.

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COURSE: INTL DV M120
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Contact CISaustralia for course description.

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COURSE: POL SCI 30
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to study of strategic interaction in political applications. Use of game theory and other formal modeling strategies to understand politics.

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COURSE: GENDER 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Consideration of how feminist social movements have identified and challenged gender-based subordination and ways feminist theorists have conceived and critiqued traditional theories of power. How have women’s and other social movements defined and challenged social, political, and economic subordination? How have feminist theorists addressed subject of power? How do empire, colonialism, liberalism, neoliberalism, and globalization produce distinctive forms of gendered violence, gendered knowledge, and gendered subjectivities? How are gender and sexuality produced and regulated by law, nation, and economy?

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COURSE: ANTHRO 110
CREDITS: 5 Units

Intended for students interested in conceptual structure of scientific archaeology. Archaeological method and theory with emphasis on what archaeologists do and how and why they do it. Consideration of field strategies, formation processes, chronological frameworks, and other crucial principles of archaeological analysis and interpretation. P/NP or letter grading.

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COURSE: PSYCH 119Y
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Broad overview of scientific study of sexual behavior, with emphases on evolutionary, biological, psychological, and social considerations. Topics include historical antecedents of sex research, evolution of sex, influence of sex hormones on brain and behavior, sexual development, and roles of genes and hormones on sexual orientation.

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115.

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COURSE: PSYCH 100A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Basic statistical procedures and their application to research and practice in various areas of psychology.

Lecture, four hours. Requisites: course 10 with a grade of C or better, and one course from Mathematics 2, Program in Computing 10A, Statistics 10, or one term of calculus. Designed for pre-majors.

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COURSE: GENDER M165
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Consideration of psychological literature relevant to understanding contemporary sex differences. Topics include sex-role development and role conflict, physiological and personality differences between men and women, sex differences in intellectual abilities and achievement, and impact of gender on social interaction.

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COURSE: PUB PLC 10D
CREDITS: 5 Units

Application of policy analysis to issues and solutions concerning homelessness. Guest lectures from local policymakers.

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COURSE: PUB PLC 10C
CREDITS: 5 Units

Application of policy analysis, including critical analysis, problem solving, and substantive policy research, to develop knowledge and understanding about drug and crime policy, with focus on cannabis. Guest lectures by instructors and guest academics and practitioners, with readings from academic literature and policy reports.

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COURSE: RELIGN 11
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to varieties of religious experience in Los Angeles and its environs. Presentations, required readings, and (where possible) site visits to examine selected faiths and spiritual practices throughout Southern California and provide deeper understanding of myriad ways that sacred is made manifest and encountered. Foundational academic orientations within study of religion (anthropological, historical, psychological, sociological, etc.) used as framework to examine and interpret almost unparalleled religious diversity of City of Angels. Recognizing that spiritual traditions are crucial reflection of region’s ever-changing demographics, emphasis on role of ethnicity, gender, nationality, and race in shaping of religious landscape.

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COURSE: ANTHRO 139
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Course Description Coming Soon!

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COURSE: GENDER 113
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Analysis of variety of contemporary sex work both in U.S. and abroad from feminist perspective. Examination of how race, class, and gender alter experience and perception of erotic labor, and consideration of critically feminist responses by range of authors to sex work. Topics include brothels, phone sex, strip clubs, sex tourism, military prostitution, and international traffic in persons. Reading of texts by sex workers, as well as articles from current philosophical and policy debates about prostitution.

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COURSE: GEOG 145
CREDITS: 4-5 Units

Pre-requisite: One course from Geography 3, Geography 4, Anthropology 3, Gender Studies 10 or Sociology 1.

Exploration of how, why, and to what ends human trafficking has been conceptualized as global problem that warrants international response. Examination of recent activist, governmental, scholarly, and media responses, and reflection on what is and is not accomplished by them. Questions of human trafficking are implicitly geographical, requiring consideration of ways freedom is spatially defined and how movement across borders is encouraged and regulated. How questions of labor, migration, sexuality, rights, ethics, embodiment, representation, and governance pertain to human trafficking. What people mean when they speak of human trafficking as slavery. Meanings of slavery and freedom in world today using examples from U.S. and Europe, with focus on Philippines as case study for exploring both contemporary examples and historical forms of enslavement.

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COURSE: PSYCH 135
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Interrelationships between the individual and his social environment. Social influences on motivation, perception, and behavior. Development and change of attitudes and opinions. Psychological analysis of small groups, social stratification, and mass phenomena.

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Designed for juniors/seniors.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 147A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Sociological theories of social origins, organization, and meanings of crime and criminal behaviors.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 128
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Sociological theories and explanations of social conditions shaping and producing emotional experiences; effects of individual expression of emotions on social conditions; relations between thought, sensations, and emotions; self and emotions; social construction of emotions.

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COURSE: GENDER M162 / SOCIOL M162
CREDITS: 5 Units

Enforced requisite: Gender Studies 10 or Sociology 1.

Examination of processes by which gender is socially constructed. Topics include distinction between biological sex and sociological gender, causes and consequences of gender inequality, and recent changes in gender relations in modern industrial societies.

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COURSE: COMM M147
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Studies in relationship between mass communication and social organization. Topics include history and organization of major media institutions, social forces that shape production of mass media news and entertainment, selected studies in media content, and effects of media on society.

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COURSE: GLBL ST 188A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Study of phenomenon of globalization through prominent case of Los Angeles. Focus on how city produces global culture, including filmed entertainment and culture of celebrity and food; and how it absorbs cultural inputs from world over. Emphasis on interactive relationship between export and import of global culture. City’s distinct cultural milieu influences nature of its cultural exports, but its viability as cultural capital depends on its ability to accommodate integrate diversity of cultures. Study creates immersive experience through films, guest speakers, and urban field trips.

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COURSE: DIS STD M161 / GENDER M161
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Since creation of International Olympic Committee in 1894, athletes with disabilities have had, and been denied, formal opportunities to compete with able-bodied athletes. Overview of some major topics of discussion concerning intersections of athletic competition and disability, addressing variety of perspectives and themes on disability and sport, such as passing, sports integration, competition versus charity, and masculinity. Sources include readings, film, television, and biographical writings that address sports, body and disability generally, and Special Olympics specifically.

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COURSE: GENDER M107A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Focus on women writers that may include historical, regional, national, or thematic emphasis, with possible topics such as authorship, self-writing, sexuality, gender, and genre. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

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COURSE: GENDER M110C / PHILOS M187
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Gender studies 10 or one philosophy course.

Examination in depth of different theoretical positions on gender and women as they have been applied to study of philosophy. Emphasis on theoretical contributions made by new scholarship on women in philosophy. Critical study of concepts and principles that arise in discussion of women’s rights and liberation. Philosophical approach to feminist theories. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

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COURSE: DIS STD M121 / GENDER M121
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Ways in which issues of disability are affected by gender, with particular attention to various roles, positions, and concerns of women with disabilities. Approach is intersectional, exploring how social categories of class, race, ethnicity, religion, age, sexuality, nationality, and citizenship affect and are affected by gender and disability. Topics may include law (civil rights, nondiscrimination), representation (arts, literature), education, public policy, health. May be repeated for credit with topic and instructor change.

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COURSE: HIST 119D
CREDITS: 5 Units

Special topics in history of Middle Ages, including religion in society, justice and law, politics of war and diplomacy, economic upheaval and renewal, and cultural representations. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change.

Middle Ages played critical role in construction of modern Western sexual and gender identities, as well as its conception of love and romance. Through close reading of primary sources, exploration of treatment of sex and sexuality in Middle Ages. Topics include love and romance, gender relations, homosexuality, marriage and adultery, gynecology and medicine, prostitution, masturbation, sexual deviancy, and eroticism.

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COURSE: ANTHRO 146
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Designed for junior/senior social sciences majors. Introduction to modern industrial cities and urban life. Examination of notion of urban space in context of social relations by drawing from historical and cross-cultural urban ethnographies. Urban space is created according to needs of capital and actions of urban subjects. Exploration of ways in which class, gender, race, and geography shape or contest perspectives and priorities on urban issues. P/NP or letter grading.

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COURSE: PUB AFF 110
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of potentialities and challenges of 21st-century urban revolution in global context. Introduction of theoretical frameworks and conceptual methods used by urban studies and planning to study cities and urban transformations, and historical and contemporary analysis of urbanization to learn about key urban processes such as agglomeration, segregation, gentrification, and suburbanization. Students learn about institutions and policies governing transportation and housing, and forms of community organizing and civil society that seek to redress urban inequalities. Introduction to key theories of space and utopian visions of urbanism.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 158
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Description and analysis of urbanization and urbanism in the U.S. and world.

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COURSE: GENDER M111
CREDITS: 5 Units

Historical issues and critical approaches to women and cinema that may include authorship, stardom, female genres, and images of women in Hollywood cinema, alternative cinema, and independent cinema from silent era to present.

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COURSE: GENDER 101W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Development of critical reading and writing skills necessary for academic success. Students engage assigned readings in conversation with week’s leading question. Generation and continuous development of paper topic as result of in-class discussions and formal writing exercises. Small writing groups assist students in understanding relationship between how written thoughts are presented and how they are comprehended by different readers. Students gain understanding of writing process, including topic conceptualization, objective of writing project, organization of thoughts and resources, selection of objects of study, personal writing style, etc.

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COURSE: A&O SCI 2
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Causes and effects of high concentrations of pollution in atmosphere. Topics include nature and sources of gaseous and particulate pollutants, their transport, dispersion, modification, and removal, with emphasis on atmospheric processes on scales ranging from individual sources to global effects; interaction with biosphere and oceans; stratospheric pollution.

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COURSE: MATH 110A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 115A.

Ring of integers, integral domains, fields, polynomial domains, unique factorization.

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COURSE: MATH 131A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 32B, 33B.

Rigorous introduction to foundations of real analysis; real numbers, point set topology in Euclidean space, functions, continuity.

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COURSE: GEOG 116
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of theories and examples of invasion of new environments by plants and animals introduced through natural processes or by human activity.

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COURSE: EPS SCI 15
CREDITS: 5 US credits

General introduction to geological, physical, chemical, and biological processes and history of Earth’s global ocean system.

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COURSE: ENVIRON 163
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of role of business in mitigating environmental degradation and incentives to be more environmentally responsive. Emphasis on corporate strategies that deliver value to shareholders while responding to environmental concerns.

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COURSE: MATH 32A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 31A.

Introduction to differential calculus of several variables, vector field theory.

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COURSE: GEOG 167
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Survey of field of cartography. Theory and construction of map projections, compilation procedures, principles of generalization, symbolization, terrain representation, lettering, drafting and scribing, and map reproduction methods.

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COURSE: LIFESCI 7A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to basic principles of cell structure and cell biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology.

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COURSE: CHEM 17
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to chemical principles: numbers, measurements, chemical calculations, gas laws, solutions, acids, bases, and salts, molecular structure, and nomenclature. Collaborative learning and problem solving; introduction to chemistry laboratory practice.

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COURSE: PSYCH 118
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Survey of determinants of species-specific behavior, including genetic influences and learning.

Requisite: course 115. Designed for junior/senior majors.

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COURSE: MATH 132
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 32B, 33B.

Introduction to basic formulas and calculation procedures of complex analysis of one variable relevant to applications. Topics include Cauchy/Riemann equations, Cauchy integral formula, power series expansion, contour integrals, residue calculus.

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COURSE: MATH 31A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Mathematics Diagnostic Test.

Differential calculus and applications; introduction to integration.

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COURSE: GEOG 1
CREDITS: 5 Units

Study of Earth’s physical environment, with particular reference to nature and distribution of landforms and climate and their significance to people.

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COURSE: ENVIRON M164 / URBN PL M160
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Environmental planning is more than simply finding problems and fixing them. Each policy must be negotiated and implemented within multiple, complex systems of governance. Institutions and politics matter deeply. Overview of how environmental governance works in practice and how it might be improved.  

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COURSE: WL ARTS M79
CREDITS: 5 Units

Examination of issues of environmental and public health effects of intensive and extensive agriculture, influence of corporations on government, animal ethics, food deserts and urban gardening, and food insecurity. Focus on representation of such issues in documentaries, public lectures, memoirs, novels, and visual art, as well as on initiatives to address such problems through policy and activism.

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COURSE: CHEM 14A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisites: High School Chemistry or equivalent background and High School Mathematics.

Introduction to physical and general chemistry principles; atomic structure based on quantum mechanics; atomic properties; trends in periodic table; chemical bonding (Lewis structures, VSEPR theory, hybridization, and molecular orbital theory); coordination compounds; properties of inorganic and organic acids, bases, buffers.

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COURSE: LIFESCI 7B
CREDITS: 5 Units

Principles of Mendelian inheritance and population genetics. Introduction to principles and mechanisms of evolution by natural selection, population, behavioral, and community ecology, and biodiversity, including major taxa and their evolutionary, ecological, and physiological relationships.

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COURSE: GEOG M128 / URBN PL CM166
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Questions of population, resource use, Third World poverty, and environment. Analysis of global economic restructuring and its connections to changing organization of production and resulting environmental impacts. Case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and U.S.

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COURSE: ENVIRON 25
CREDITS: 5 Units

Good food is healthy, sustainably produced, and culturally meaningful. Introduction to basic concepts and history of food systems, food science and nutrition, fair and sustainable food production, natural resources and environmental issues including climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and food policy and law, food distribution and access, cultural identity and artistic engagements with food.

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COURSE: INF STD 30
CREDITS: 5 Units

Examination of information technology in society, including Internet, World Wide Web, search engines (e.g., Google, Yahoo, Lycos), retrieval systems, electronic publishing, and distribution of media, including newspapers, books, and music. Exploration of many of these technologies, social, cultural, and political context in which they exist, and how social relationships are changing.

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COURSE: MATH 61
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 31A, 31B.

Discrete structures commonly used in computer science and mathematics, including sets and relations, permutations and combinations, graphs and trees, induction.

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COURSE: EPS SCI 1
CREDITS: 5 US credits

Elements of Earth science; study of Earth materials; nature and interpretation of geologic evidence; study of geologic processes; historical aspects of geology. Mandatory field trips introduce students to solving of geologic problems in field.

Students will be required to attend lectures and laboratories. Additional lab fees apply.

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COURSE: GEOG 7
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to fundamental principles and concepts necessary to carry out sound geographic analysis with geographic information systems (GIS). Reinforcement of key issues in GIS, such as geographic coordinate systems, map projections, spatial analysis, and visualization of spatial data. Laboratory exercises use database query, manipulation, and spatial analysis to address real-world problems.

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COURSE: NURSING 13
CREDITS: 5 Units

Structural presentation of human body, including musculoskeletal, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive systems. Laboratory uses virtual cadaver dissection and examination.

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COURSE: LIFESCI 23L
CREDITS: 3 Units

Pre-requisite: Life Sciences 2 or 7B.

Introductory life sciences laboratory designed for undergraduate students. Opportunity to conduct wet-laboratory and cutting-edge bioinformatics laboratory experiments. Students work in groups of three conducting experiments in areas of physiology, metabolism, cell biology, molecular biology, genotyping, and bioinformatics.

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COURSE: ARCH&UD CM153 / ENVIRON M153
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Relationship of built environment to natural environment through whole systems approach, with focus on sustainable design of buildings and planning of communities. Emphasis on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and appropriate use of resources, including materials, water, and land.  

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COURSE: PSYCH 15
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Designed for non majors. Survey of genetic, evolutionary, physiological, pharmacological, and experiential factors affecting behavior. Using comparative approach where appropriate, emphasis on relevance of biological mechanisms to understanding of humans and their interaction with their environment.

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COURSE: ASTR5
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Life on Earth and prospects for life elsewhere in context of evolution of universe from simple to complex. Course material primarily from astronomy and biology but includes some chemistry, geology, and physics. Selected topics treated in some depth, but with little or no formal mathematics.

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COURSE: MATH 115
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 33A.

Techniques of proof, abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, and matrices; determinants; inner product spaces; eigenvector theory.

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COURSE: MATH 33A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 3B or 31B or 32A.

Introduction to linear algebra: systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, linear independence, subspaces, bases and dimension, orthogonality, least-squares methods, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, matrix diagonalization, and symmetric matrices.

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COURSE: MATH 134
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 33B.

Dynamical systems analysis of nonlinear systems of differential equations. One- and two- dimensional flows. Fixed points, limit cycles, and stability analysis. Bifurcations and normal forms. Elementary geometrical and topological results. Applications to problems in biology, chemistry, physics, and other fields.

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COURSE: MATH 167
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 115A.

Quantitative modeling of strategic interaction. Topics include extensive and normal form games, background probability, lotteries, mixed strategies, pure and mixed Nash equilibria and refinements, bargaining; emphasis on economic examples. Optional topics include repeated games and evolutionary game theory.

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COURSE: MATH 142
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 33A, 33B.

Introduction to fundamental principles and spirit of applied mathematics. Emphasis on manner in which mathematical models are constructed for physical problems. Illustrations from many fields of endeavor, such as physical sciences, biology, economics, and traffic dynamics.

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COURSE: MATH 135
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 33A, 33B.

Selected topics in differential equations. Laplace transforms, existence and uniqueness theorems, Fourier series, separation of variable solutions to partial differential equations, Sturm/Liouville theory, calculus of variations, two-point boundary value problems, Green’s functions.

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COURSE: MATH 3C
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: MATH 3B.

Multivariable modeling, matrices and vectors, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear and nonlinear systems of differential equations, probabilistic applications of integration.

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COURSE: GEOG 5
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of ways in which human activity impacts natural environment and how modification of environment can eventually have significant consequences for human activity. Examination, using case studies, of real environmental problems that confront us today.

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COURSE: LIFESCI 7C
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Life Sciences 7B.

Organization of cells into tissues and organs and principles of physiology of organ systems. Introduction to human genetics and genomics.

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COURSE: MATH 1
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Successful completion of Mathematics Diagnostic Test.

Linear and polynomial functions and their graphs, applications to optimization. Inverse, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Trigonometric functions.

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COURSE: PSYCH 119Y
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Broad overview of scientific study of sexual behavior, with emphases on evolutionary, biological, psychological, and social considerations. Topics include historical antecedents of sex research, evolution of sex, influence of sex hormones on brain and behavior, sexual development, and roles of genes and hormones on sexual orientation.

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115.

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COURSE: PSYCH 100A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Basic statistical procedures and their application to research and practice in various areas of psychology.

Lecture, four hours. Requisites: course 10 with a grade of C or better, and one course from Mathematics 2, Program in Computing 10A, Statistics 10, or one term of calculus. Designed for pre-majors.

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COURSE: EPS SCI 9
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Properties of sun, planets, asteroids, and comets. Astronomical observations relevant to understanding solar system and its origin. Dynamical problems, including examination of fallacious hypotheses. Meteoritic evidence regarding earliest history of solar system. Chemical models of solar nebula. Space exploration and its planning.

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COURSE: ECON 41
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B.

Introduction to probability and statistics for economists, with emphasis on rigorous arguments. Not open to students with credit for former Statistics 11.

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COURSE: GEOG M149 / URBN PL M150
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Study of geographical aspects of transportation, with focus on characteristics and functions of various modes and on complexities of intra-urban transport.

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COURSE: GEOG 122
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Analysis of tropical ecosystems of eastern Africa, including wildlife communities, vegetation, climate, and human impact. Discussion of national park systems and their natural and anthropogenic ecological dynamics.

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Excursions

The Office of Residential Life organises several optional trips and activities on weekends and evenings (at additional expense). Some examples are trips to Disneyland, Magic Mountain, Universal Studios, Catalina Island and outlet mall shopping excursions on the weekends. There are also trips to local attractions such as the beach, movie nights, baseball games and bowling alleys. There are often trips scheduled for outside the LA area. Past trips have included Las Vegas, San Francisco and the Grand Canyon. Sign-up sheets and tickets will be available on arrival, and all students are welcome to participate. There are extra fees for these trips, and transportation is typically included in those costs.

The CISaustralia Site Director will also welcome you to LA and help you settle in. Our friendly, local Site Director will conduct a number of cultural activities and/or excursions during your six weeks at UCLA. These activities change every year and will be confirmed by your Site Director on arrival. Activities that have been hosted in the past have included a baseball or basketball game, welcome and/or farewell dinner, local tours, group meals, visits to the J. Paul “Getty” Museum, Santa Monica pier walking tours, and other similar outings. All the CISaustralia activities organised by your Site Director are included in your program fee.

Location

UCLA lies at the heart of one of the most dynamic cities in the world – Los Angeles.

Bordered by iconic neighbourhoods – Bel Air, Brentwood, Beverly Hills – UCLA is a crossroads of ideas, cultures, opportunities and limitless experiences.

UCLA is located in Westwood in the northern central portion of the Westside region of LA. From its hip arts district to fine dining, the Westside is home to many of LA’s best restaurants, high-end shopping, eclectic boutiques and superb cultural and historic attractions.

LA is arguably the entertainment capital of the world, a cultural mecca boasting more than 300 museums and a paradise of good weather. With a multitude of tourist attractions, great career opportunities, amazing restaurants and entertainment galore – LA is simply the place to be.

A few facts about the city of LA:

  • It is the only city in North America to have hosted the Summer Olympics twice.
  • LA County, with more than 87,000 jobs in the fashion industry, has surpassed New York’s fashion district workforce.
  • The LA five-county area also has more than 700,000 people at work in health services/biomedical activities and 190,000 people in aerospace/technology.
  • The city of LA is home to 3.8 million people, growing to 9.8 million if considering the County of LA.
  • LA is an international destination city that is a hub of creativity in the arts and business.
  • LA is filled with vibrant neighbourhoods and ethnic communities, including Chinatown, Koreatown and Little India.

Westwood Village – Home of UCLA

Located just south of the UCLA campus, Westwood Village is designed with students in mind. It has three major supermarkets and dozens of restaurants and cafés. Among its movie theatres is the Mann Village Theatre, which hosts frequent Hollywood movie premieres. A playhouse and museum are also part of the mix. Just a few minutes away by bus you can visit the Getty Centre (a museum famous for its art collection, architecture, and commanding views of Los Angeles). Admission is free.

Nearby:

Once a sleepy beach town, Santa Monica is now a vibrant city between UCLA and the coast. In addition to Santa Monica’s beaches and the famed Santa Monica Pier, you can take a walk on Main Street, lined with art galleries and shops or the Third Street Promenade, a pedestrian district with restaurants, more than 200 shops, a farmers market and street performers.

Beverly Hills – Just a couple of kilometres from UCLA you’ll find the tree-lined boulevards of Beverly Hills and Rodeo Drive. If shopping and locating star homes isn’t your thing, you can take in a movie screening at the Museum of Television and Radio.

Venice – Famous for its beachfront boardwalk, Venice is home to Muscle Beach and always some colourful characters. This beach resort, complete with a casino and a pier full of restaurants, remains a great place for playing and people watching.

Beyond Los Angeles – When you are at UCLA, you don’t have far to go to explore the rest of California. To the east is the desert – try your hand at climbing the rocks at Joshua Tree National Park. To the south, you can surf the beaches of Orange and San Diego counties. Head north on Highway 1 for unforgettable ocean views, enjoy lunch in Santa Barbara and perhaps continue north and explore the streets and bridges of San Francisco, the Napa Valley vineyards and breathtaking Yosemite National Park.

Attractions:

Rodeo Drive – The internationally known shopping destination anchored by Tiffany, Bulgari, Armani and other high-end retailers.

Third Street Promenade, Santa Monica – An attractive pedestrian district in beachside Santa Monica, complete with shops, restaurants and street performers.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the La Brea Tar Pits – The county museum of art has an extensive collection, special exhibits and frequent cultural events, including free jazz on Friday evenings. Next door, visit the La Brea Tar Pits, where stone-age animals became entrapped in pools of asphalt!

Venice Beach – A beautiful stretch of beach and ocean with a boardwalk that is home to an eclectic group of artists and performers.

Dodger Stadium – Home to the Dodgers, LA’s professional baseball team. Head to the stadium to eat popcorn and hot dogs while you cheer on the Big Blue!

Universal City Walk – A collection of restaurants, shops, cinemas and music clubs located within Universal Studios.

The Getty Centre – A nearby museum that is famously admired for its art collection, architecture and commanding view of LA. Admission is free.

Griffith Park – The largest city park in the US with many attractions, including an observatory, a train museum and even a pony ride!

Hollywood and Highland – At this famous corner you’ll find several famous Hollywood landmarks: Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, the Hollywood Walk of Fame (see the stars of our Aussies Nicole Kidman, Cate Blanchett and Hugh Jackman), and the Kodak Theatre (now known as Dolby Theatre and home to the Academy Awards ceremonies, ‘the Oscars’).

Disneyland in nearby Anaheim is Walt Disney’s original theme park. This is a favourite destination for students and pretty much most people that visit LA. The UCLA residential halls organise visits to Disneyland for students in the ‘summer’ session. Pop on those Mickey Mouse ears and get ready to experience Adventureland, Frontierland, Fantasyland and Tomorrowland… you get the picture!

The University

Did we mention UCLA ranked 12th in academics and 8th for reputation in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings?

UCLA is a university built on optimism – this can-do perspective has brought them 12 Nobel Prizes, 12 Rhodes Scholarships, more National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) titles than any university and more Olympic medals than most nations. The faculty and alumni helped create the Internet and pioneered reverse osmosis. Not to mention more than 100 companies have been created based on technology developed at UCLA.

The UCLA campus is in a superb location with accessible and economical transport available to explore the region. The campus is well maintained, the facilities world class and the student body welcoming.

As a UCLA ‘summer’ (July) session student you have hundreds of academic courses to choose from, high standard on-campus accommodation and full access to the university facilities, including multiple libraries and two recreation centres – the John Wooden Centre and the Sunset Canyon Recreation Centre. Combined, the recreation centres offer hundreds of fitness classes and activities. Your options stretch from individual use of workout equipment and swimming pools to participation in fitness classes, yoga and martial arts – not to mention basketball courts, athletic tracks, volleyball courts and a rock climbing wall. For access to UCLA Recreation Services, you will need a valid student card (BruinCard) which we will assist you to apply for.

There are several ATMs located throughout campus. Bank ATMs give access to the Star, Plus or Cirrus networks, so you can often use these ATMs on a network arrangement to withdraw funds. There is also a post office, hair salon, multiple computer labs and several libraries – all just a short walk from your accommodation.

Wireless internet access is available in select locations on-campus for users with an eligible UCLA Login ID and appropriate wireless network interface card. There are also cable TV and computer network connections in each room of the on-campus accommodation.

UCLA have on-campus security – at designated times, free of charge you can be walked or dropped to different buildings on campus –and also the campus and surrounds are patrolled by the University of California Police Department. Exterior doors of residence halls and suites are locked and equipped with alarms. Your student card (BruinCard) lets you in.

Westwood Village is within walking distance to the campus where you will find many shops and some great eateries and restaurants. A large shopping mall that sells electronics, linen and furnishings is about 15 minutes by bus from UCLA.

Your student ID is called your ‘BruinCard’ and it is your passport to life at UCLA. It serves many purposes and the convenience of all the included features makes it a must-have necessity. You will receive this card once you arrive at UCLA.

BruinCard features and functions include:

  • Official university ID
  • Pre-paid debit feature can be used for purchases at campus stores and restaurants and at select local merchants
  • Library card to check out materials and pay for copies and printing
  • Campus gym and recreational facilities pass
  • Access card for on-campus housing residential buildings
  • Meal card for meal swipes at any of the residential restaurants in on-campus housing
  • Laundry card for all university housing facilities
  • Transportation card for discounted fares

Note: Bruin is an Old English word used for brown bears. The Bruin is the mascot of the sports teams of the UCLA.

Accommodation

The university provides comfortably furnished residence halls and off-campus university apartments within easy walking distance of classrooms, libraries, swimming pools and recreational facilities.

The residence halls offered for the ‘summer’ (July) session are new or renovated – students love the atmosphere and location. Most of the accommodation is elevated overlooking the campus. Accommodation is offered on a first in best dressed scenario, so be sure to apply well ahead of our deadline so we can confirm your accommodation placement.

During your program, you’ll be able to choose from two accommodation options: Residence Halls and Off-Campus Apartments.

On-Campus Residence Halls:

Residence Hall rooms are shared by two (sometimes three students). Each room is carpeted and includes a twin bed, desk, chair, bookcase, cupboard and drawer space for each student. Students live on coed floors with designated male and female community restrooms with private showers located on each floor. There are also cable TV and computer network connections in each room. There are coin operated laundry facilities on each floor of the halls. A refrigerator rental service is available to students when they arrive. The Halls of Residence accommodation package includes 11 meals per week (and can be used at breakfast, lunch or dinner).

Upon arrival, each resident is provided with one set of bed linens, a pillow, blanket, towel and washcloth for use during their ‘summer’.

The Office of Residential Life organises evening entertainment for students staying in on-campus housing. Information about the events is posted around the buildings. Special events like movie nights, barbecues, dances and organised trips to places of interest in Southern California are planned for residents throughout the summer.

Other Amenities 
A refrigerator rental service is available to students when they arrive. Coin-operated laundry facilities are located on each floor of the halls. If you choose to purchase a television, basic cable television service is provided to all rooms.

Dining Services 
The fees for Residence Halls include meals (11 per week) at various student dining halls, which begin with dinner on the Sunday evening before classes start and end with breakfast on the last Saturday of check-out.

Off-Campus University Apartments:

The university apartments are close to campus, within a few minutes’ walking distance. Students will share a fully-furnished apartment with up to four other students. Apartments are shared and there may be one bedroom with two beds, or two bedrooms with four beds. A linen pack is provided for each resident.

Utilities such as electricity, air conditioning, water, television, internet and gas for cooking are included. Kitchens come fully equipped with a refrigerator, stove, microwave, oven and dishwasher. Please note that you will need to provide your own cooking utensils. Coin-operated laundry facilities are available in each building, and each apartment has its own mailbox.

Smoking
UCLA is smoke-free! Smoking in housing, classrooms and all campus facilities is prohibited.

Program Fee & Dates

July 2020
Application Deadline13 April 2020
Arrival Date23 June 2020
Departure Date02 August 2020
Program Fee A$ 9,899 - 10,499
OS-HELP A$ 6,913

 

Program fees include the following:
  • Tuition fees (2 courses = 8 US credits)
  • CISaustralia support services before, during and after the program
  • Academic advising
  • Financial advice
  • Assistance with travel arrangements
  • Medical and accident insurance (if requested)
  • Pre-departure guide and session
  • Airport pick-up (on specified program arrival date within designated arrival times)
  • All additional UCLA registration, orientation and document fees
  • Accommodation for duration of program (shared rooms)
  • A meal plan is available for on-campus accommodation only (11 meals per week)
  • On-campus internet
  • Access to gym, pool, library, multiple eateries
  • Selected excursions and/or cultural activities
  • CISaustralia 24/7 on-site support – Site Director
  • UCLA official transcript
  • CISaustralia Certificate of Completion

A comprehensive online pre-arrival orientation will be provided to help answer any questions you may have about UCLA, Los Angeles, campus resources and more. You are required to complete all modules of the UCLA orientation by the Friday before the beginning of your CISaustralia July session.

What is not included:

  • Flights
  • Travel insurance
  • Visa fees*
  • Vaccinations (if required)
  • Meals (unless mentioned above)
  • Extra travel/excursions (other than those mentioned above)

*Students should expect to pay approx. A$500 for their student visa, pending the exchange rate ($AUD to $USD). The visa fee of approx. A$500 includes 3 different components – a US Government visa application fee, a US Government Issuance Fee and the US Government ‘Student and Exchange Visitor Information System’ (SEVIS) fee. US Government student visa fees are regulated by the US Government and are subject to change without notice. CISaustralia cannot charge or collect fees for the US student visa.

Note: Students could opt to undertake more than 8 US credits, however, there would be an additional tuition charge for this. CISaustralia would not recommend a study load any larger than 8 US credits (typically 2 courses) during your 6 week July at UCLA program.

Please note that additional lab, service fees and/or additional credit fees may apply to your UCLA enrolment in July. These fees will be charged by UCLA to CISaustralia (after your arrival at UCLA), who will in turn pass these fees onto each CISaustralia student. Additional lab fees will not normally apply to standard courses in business or humanities. Additional fees could be applied for the following:

1. Students will be charged additional tuition fees for any additional credits studied over and above the standard 8 US credits for the CISaustralia July at UCLA program, and / or

2. Laboratory fees that might be associated with lab classes. Lab fees are likely to exist for science, engineering (or similar) related courses. Lab fees are not included in the standard program fee and students might expect to pay an additional amount of approx. AUD$600 per course (fees fluctuate per course and are implemented by UCLA without discussion or negotiation).

Students are required to pay for any additional lab or credit fees, and will be invoiced by CISaustralia at the end of the UCLA add/drop period. Students should select courses carefully and note the US credit weighting for each course. The CISaustralia program to UCLA in July only includes up to and including 8 US credits (normally 2 x 4 US credit courses). Students who choose courses with a higher US credit weighting, i.e. more than 8 US credits for two courses, will be charged at approx. $450 per additional US credit (pending current exchange rates). This fee will be calculated after the student’s first week at UCLA (the UCLA add / drop period) and CISaustralia will invoice all students directly after week one of the program for any additional US credits or lab fees. UCLA transcripts will be available once all fees have been paid in full to CISaustralia.

Any additional fees incurred while onsite (e.g. UCLA Health Services) need to be paid by students through their MyUCLA account before the program ends. Transcripts will be held until payment is made and processed.

Dates are for reference only and are subject to change. Please do not book flights until you have received the confirmed dates in your acceptance paperwork.

CISaustralia reserves the right to alter fees at any time due to currency fluctuations and/or fee changes made by our partner universities.

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