July in Los Angeles, USA at UCLA

Live and study in sunny, seaside Los Angeles, California for either 3 or 6 weeks. Take classes at the diverse and prestigious University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) for a fun and productive short-term course abroad.

Program Overview

Spend 3 or 6 weeks studying at one of the best Universities in the world – gain credit while experiencing a global city and campus like no other!

As a UCLA ‘summer’ (July) session student you have access to hundreds of academic courses, on and off campus living options, all of the university facilities, including multiple gyms, pools, libraries…..everything you need!

Start getting excited!

Attend one of the highest ranked universities in the world – UCLA was ranked the #1 public university and #20 among all national universities in the 2021 U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges rankings. UCLA also ranked #9 out of 100 universities in the Times Higher Education World Reputation Rankings (2020) and the #15 best university in the world (2021) by U.S. News & World Report.

Opportunity to be a part of a university that receives more student applications than any other in the US – actually make that the world! This is the university that students dream of attending, and as a CISaustralia student you will have that opportunity.

Choose to study from a multitude of disciplines – business, management, finance, accounting, humanities, the arts, social science, sociology, anthropology, history, communications, journalism, health and health related fields, IT, engineering and more.

UCLA has everything you could possibly need to have an interesting and fun-filled Aussie winter (US summer) – beginning with its lush landscaping and impressive architecture, the campus is an experience in itself – add to this modern residential halls, libraries, world class athletic facilities, a multitude of entertainment opportunities and you realise that a US summer (July) session at UCLA is not only academically rewarding but also a great place to spend 3 or 6 weeks of your Australian winter!

Live and study in the entertainment capital of the world – LA. It’s a cultural mecca boasting more than 300 museums, not to mention a paradise of good weather. LA has an average of 284 – 312 days of sunshine every year (not all the authorities can agree). Let’s just say that it’s sunny a lot! Compare this to 185 sunny days per year in Melbourne or even 261 for Brisbane!

Study in a welcoming environment that appreciates diversity and a global perspective – the UCLA campus has more than 17,000 US students and more than 1,300 international students enrolled over the US ‘summer’ session.

Enjoy summer in LA – experience outdoor concerts at the Hollywood Bowl and the Greek Theater. Many activities in the city are free, including stargazing at the Griffith Observatory, hipster watching in Silver Lake and outings to the mountains and beaches.

Highlights

LA and UCLA have it all! There are 1-2 cultural excursions/activities included in the program fees, plus you will have plenty of free time to check out some of the awesome things you can discover firsthand on your own during your program.

  • Amazing University in a beautiful, inspiring setting – there is a reason why UCLA receives more applications than any other university in the world!
  • 3 or 6 weeks living and experiencing all LA has to offer – weekend trips to Disneyland, Magic Mountain, Universal Studios, walking down Santa Monica Boulevard, window shopping in Beverly Hills, people watching in Venice Beach and catching a Dodgers baseball game
  • Gain credit for 1 or 2 academic courses that are available to full-time UCLA students during the academic year
  • Be guided by world class lecturers and professors – UCLA boasts a research focus that is envied by most institutions around the globe
  • Choose from hundreds of UCLA courses on the 6-week session (or select course/s on offer for the 3-week session)
  • Meet students from around the world – create a lifelong network of like-minded and motivated friends
  • All the amazing places you can visit from your base in LA! Places like Las Vegas, Yosemite National Park, San Francisco, San Diego and even Mexico
  • Enjoy being a part of arguably the entertainment capital of the world, LA is a cultural mecca boasting more than 300 museums!
  • While Australia is in the middle of winter, take 3 or 6 weeks out in the Californian summer
  • Try out new restaurants, visit the tourist attractions or sit back and chill out on the beach

Choose Your Course

UCLA has one of the strongest education brands in the USA and globally. UCLA is highly ranked and sought after by students worldwide and it receives the most applications of any university in the world!

Business Insider has ranked UCLA as having the most driven students in the world, boosting the school’s prestige with respect to recruiting and hiring.

As an international student at UCLA, you have hundreds of courses to choose from, from ecology and engineering to dance and psychology, from gender studies to Japanese and linguistics – the options are phenomenal. You are able to enrol in academic courses that are exclusively available to full-time UCLA students during the academic year.

Course Load:

  • 1 course (4 US credits) on the 3-week session (1 Course Available)
  • 2 courses (8 US credits) on the 6-week session (100+ Courses Available)

UCLA is very clear that students MUST be enrolled as a full-time student (4 US credits per 3 weeks or 8 US credit per 6 weeks) to keep their valid student visa.

  • Depending on your Australian university, “courses” may be referred to as “subjects” or “units”.
  • Each course/subject/unit you undertake on a CISaustralia program is designed to be a full-time, semester course that has been condensed to fit into an intensive, short-term program. As such, for any 1 course you study abroad, you should receive the credit points for 1 full-time course/subject/unit at your Australian university.
  • Many universities work off of a 1-for-1 equivalency (1 course abroad = 1 course in Australia), but ultimately credit approval is the decision of your faculty and Australian university.
  • CISaustralia strongly recommends that you have any overseas courses pre-approved for academic credit before you depart for your program. Some documentation that may be useful are the course outline/syllabus, program overview and the contact hours.
  • It is best to get 4 or 5 courses approved by your Australian university before you depart for your overseas program. This way you will have plenty of classes to choose from and some flexibility in setting up your schedule.
  • Please be aware that the courses listed below are subject to change and cannot be guaranteed year on year.
  • Your CISaustralia Program Advisor can assist with any questions or details your university needs to make a decision.

How to Choose Your Courses: Now this is the fun part. As part of your application you will complete a CISaustralia Course Selection Worksheet. The instructions provided will assist you through the steps involved in selecting your courses.

On the first day of class your instructor will let you know what textbooks you need to buy. Most assigned textbooks will be available for purchase at the UCLA Bookstore.

You may add and/or drop courses anytime before 5 p.m. Friday, Week 1 of the program. After this deadline late fees will apply. It is your responsibility to make sure any course changes in the U.S. are pre-approved by your University in Australia.

Academic Requirement: To qualify for this program, students must be in good academic standing with a GPA of 4.0 (out of 7) or equivalent. If your current GPA falls below the requirement, you may still be considered for the program but will need to be prepared to provide supporting documentation. Please contact us to discuss your situation and we will work with you to help find another suitable program if required.

Course Descriptions:

Session 1 (3 weeks) offers 1 course! (Click here for Session 1 Course Syllabus)

  • COMM 187 – Ethical and Policy Issues in Institutions of Mass Communication

Session A (6 weeks) offers over 100 courses! See Course Descriptions below. Enquire with your CISaustralia Program Advisor to confirm if the courses you are interested in are offered and to request a copy of the UCLA course syllabus.

  • For Session A, please ensure you have 5-6 cours options in mind, and approved by your university if seeking academic credit. At UCLA, some courses fill up very quickly, and they do make occasional late changes to offerings for Summer School which are out of our control, so the more options you have the better!
  • The Session A program fee includes the standard 8 US credits worth of study for Session A. As you will be studying 2 subjects during the session, the majority of the courses listed on our website are worth 4 US credits each. However, some courses listed are worth 5 credits, so if you are planning to choose one of these, please be aware that an extra fee of approximately AU$560 will apply for each credit over the 8 standard credits.
  • Please note that UCLA does not not enforce specified prerequisites for CISaustralia students, however we strongly recommend you have a background in the area of study.
COURSE: THEATER 20
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introduction to interpretation of drama through art of actor. Development of individual insights, skills, and disciplines in presentation of dramatic material to audiences.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ART 133
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Pre-requisite: Course 11A

Varied media and subjects to further develop students’ technical and expressive means to implement their ideas. May be repeated for maximum of 20 units.

COURSE: DANCE 13
CREDITS: 2 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Beginning-level study of ballet as movement practice.

COURSE: MUSC 80F
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introduction to guitar techniques, accompanying, and arranging for guitar; coverage of note reading and tablature. May be repeated for credit without limitation.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DANCE 9
CREDITS: 2 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

This course is a Beginning study of Streetdance, focusing on the foundation and technique of Hip Hop (party dances) and Locking. This level course will focus on the basic grooves of each dance style, while also exploring rhythmic isolated muscle movements & movement precision for several vocabularies. The history and understanding of these Street Dance Styles will be discussed in class to fully understand the essence of all styles learned and its importance and connection to community, specifically how it all began within the POC communities within USA.

COURSE: MUSC 80A
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Simple keyboard skills together with basic aspects of music theory and its practical application to keyboard: sight-reading, tonality, chords, scales, cadences, simple compositions, and improvisations. May be repeated for credit without limitation.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ETHNMUS M107
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introduction to development of rap music and hip-hop culture, with emphasis on musical and verbal qualities, philosophical and political ideologies, gender representation, and influences on cinema and popular culture. P/NP or letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DESMA 10
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Open to non-majors. Understanding design process, with emphasis on development of visual language; study of historic, scientific, technological, economic, and cultural factors influencing design in physical environment.

COURSE: MSC IND 116A
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Seminar, four hours. Course 116A is requisite to 116B. Recommended: course 107A. Introduction to contemporary digital production through mastery of beat-driven musical textures. Use of digital audio workstations, plugins and hardware, creation of live performance rigs controlling sound and vision. Students develop proficiency in key styles of beat-oriented popular music, including hip-hop, electronic dance music, pop, and experimental rhythm and blues. Principles of analog and digital synthesis, creation of sound libraries, composing for film and digital media. Sound amplification and integration of live performance with digital sound. Electronically submitted final project. P/NP or letter grading.

COURSE: ETHNMUS 122
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Focused study on K-pop–South Korea’s most significant cultural export. Close attention is paid to global influences that have shaped Korean popular music in earlier decades and in turn, unprecedented global reach of K-pop in recent history. Study is divided into three units: contextualizing K-pop, transnational flows in K-pop, and critical takes on K-pop. Each unit features distinctive case studies, and lectures draw out some of broader linkages between units as they relate to modern Korean history, Cold War geopolitical formations and legacies, modern South Korean state and economy, and spread of Korean popular culture. Study draws on wide array of scholarly articles, journalistic pieces, music videos, webinars, and online resources while foregrounding larger issues that emerge through cultural analysis. P/NP or letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ETHNMUS 25
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Development of world music or world beat, including its meaning and importance to contemporary culture as well as its history and impact.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MUSCLG 5
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Analysis of forms, practices, and meanings of rock and roll music, broadly conceived, from its origin to present. Emphasis on how this music has reflected and influenced changes in sexual, racial, and class identities and attitudes. Credit for both courses 5 and 185 not allowed. Letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ETHNMUS 46W
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Exploration of major aspects of society, history, and culture in India through music. There is abundance of incredibly rich musical culture in this region. Introduction to as much diversity as possible, spanning villages to cities and global contexts; high- and low-brow musics; those spanning problematic categories of folk, classical, and popular; and those from powerful as well as oppressed and marginalized peoples. Music as lens to look more deeply into social and cultural world and to explore layers of history ranging form Persianate empires, British Empire, nationhood, and contemporary globalization. Highlights lines of power in particular, notably, those of caste, class, gender, colonialism, and nationalism. Minoritized and disenfranchised people and their music are as prominent as dominant styles and provide contextualization and critique. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MUSC M14
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of music of Western classical tradition, with emphasis on historical context, musical meanings, and creation of tradition itself. P/NP or letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MSC IND 112A
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Learning and employment of craft of songwriting. Examination, analysis, and implementation of song structure, lyric and melody writing, arranging, orchestrating, and recording techniques. Evolution of songwriting in modern society since advent of phonograph player/radio; how songs and society affect and reflect one another; how this has informed songs and songwriters. Letter grading.

COURSE: ARCH&UD CM153 / ENVIRON M153
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Relationship of built environment to natural environment through whole systems approach, with focus on sustainable design of buildings and planning of communities. Emphasis on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and appropriate use of resources, including materials, water, and land.  

COURSE: DESMA 24
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introduction and integration of traditional design tools, camera, and digital technologies for application to visual thinking and fundamentals of design. Studio, six hours; outside study, six hours.

COURSE: MSC IND 2
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to current music industry. Overview of career paths, monetization strategies, organizational behavior, and entrepreneurial thinking. Designed to serve as gateway for music industry degree programs. Students familiarize themselves with basic functions of industry that are covered in greater detail in upper-division coursework. Letter grading.

COURSE: CHICANO M108A
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Survey of traditional and contemporary musical culture.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MSC IND 115
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Exploration of techniques, methods, and process of music production and larger issues in art of making music. Students learn how to foster and capture performance and emotion in music through variety of methods and tools, including artistic direction in studio and choices made in sound, arrangement, and application of technology.

COURSE: MUSC 7
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Musical experience helpful, but not required. Brief historical survey of film music, with strong emphasis on recent development: Japanese animation, advertising, and MTV, as well as computer tools and digital scoring methods. Designed to inspire and inform those interested in movie music.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MUSC 80V
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Voice instruction for singers at beginning to intermediate level. Exploration of fundamentals of vocal technique, including overview of basics of proper breath control, resonance, care of voice, diction, and interpretation. Beginning vocal repertoire used as vehicle for understanding these concepts. May be repeated for credit without limitation.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MUSCLG 12W
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour. Emphasis on learning specific skills, incorporating technical description, historical contextualization, subjective reaction, and certain stylistic conventions necessary in writing about music. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MGMT 108
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Essentials of contracts, agency, partnerships, corporations, and other select areas of law in a business environment.

COURSE: ENVIRON 163
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Examination of role of business in mitigating environmental degradation and incentives to be more environmentally responsive. Emphasis on corporate strategies that deliver value to shareholders while responding to environmental concerns.

COURSE: COMM 109
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, four hours. Study of entrepreneurial communication from foundations in internal and external communication and development of data analysis, interpretation, and presentational skills utilized in existing, as well as in development of, contemporary innovative businesses. P/NP or letter grading.

COURSE: MGMT 160
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to key concepts of entrepreneurship, including new product development, finance, business plan development, and technology commercialization. Basic tools and personal characteristics required for entrepreneurship. Terminology used by lawyers, accountants, venture capitalists, and other investors when forming and financing new companies to be developed as startups, spinouts from existing company, or acquisitions of existing company (or its assets). Assessment of feasibility of business concept and communication of concept to potential investors, employees, and business partners. Discussion of technology feasibility, intellectual property, and licensing. Letter grading.

COURSE: ECON 102
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 101. Theory of income, employment, and price level. Analysis of secular growth and business fluctuations; introduction to monetary and fiscal policy. P/NP or letter grading.

COURSE: MGMT 1A
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introduction to financial accounting principles, including preparation and analysis of financial transactions and financial statements. Valuation and recording of asset-related transactions, including cash, receivables, marketable securities, inventories, and long-lived assets. Current liabilities.

COURSE: ECON 1
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introduction to principles of economic analysis, economic institutions, and issues of economic policy. Emphasis on allocation of resources and distribution of income through price system.

COURSE: COMM 157
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Analysis of how following personal lives of media-created celebrities impacts self-esteem, connectedness, and personal relationships from cultural studies and social sciences perspectives, and how entities cultivate celebrity for financial gain. Topics include celebrity gossip and privacy, news sharing, public relations, and impact of social media on fan support, image construction, and damage control.

COURSE: COMM 100
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Pre-requisite: Course 10 or Linguistics 1 or Sociology 1 or Psychology 10.

Examination of fundamental principles in human communication science. Topics include models of communication, levels of analysis in the behavioral sciences, cultural evolution, new media and big data, political communication, and the nature of art.

COURSE: FILM TV 122E
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

With lectures, screenings, and demonstrations, study of principles of digital cinematography. How tools and techniques affect visual storytelling process. Topics include formats, aspect ratios, cameras, lenses, special effects, internal menu picture manipulation, lighting, composition, coverage, high definition, digital exhibition, filtration, multiple-camera shooting.

COURSE: COMM 109
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, four hours. Study of entrepreneurial communication from foundations in internal and external communication and development of data analysis, interpretation, and presentational skills utilized in existing, as well as in development of, contemporary innovative businesses. P/NP or letter grading.

COURSE: FILM TV 122D
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Practical application of film editing techniques, how they have evolved, and continue to evolve. Examination of history of editing, as well as current editing trends, terminology, and workflow.

COURSE: FILM TV 122M
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Through discussions, screenings, demonstrations, and guests, exploration of script, previsualization, directing actors, directing camera coverage in relationship to story, practical on-set directing, and directing for camera.

COURSE: FILM TV 4
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Students acquire understanding of practical and aesthetic challenges undertaken by artists and professionals in making of motion pictures and television. Examination of film as both art and industry: storytelling, sound and visual design, casting and performance, editing, finance, advertising, and distribution. Exploration of American and world cinema from filmmaker’s perspective. Honing of analytical skills and development of critical vocabulary for study of filmmaking as technical, artistic, and cultural phenomenon.

COURSE: FILM TV 33
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Structural analysis of feature films and development of professional screenwriters’ vocabulary for constructing, deconstructing, and reconstructing their own work. Screenings of films and selected film sequences in class and by assignment.

COURSE: COMM 1
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing.

Examination of foundations of communication and public speaking. Consideration of number of basic theories related to study of communication and development of skills to enable composition and delivery of speeches in accordance with specific rhetorical concepts. Improvement of ability to analyze, organize, and critically think about communicative messages while becoming better equipped to articulate ideas.

COURSE: MUSC 7
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Musical experience helpful, but not required. Brief historical survey of film music, with strong emphasis on recent development: Japanese animation, advertising, and MTV, as well as computer tools and digital scoring methods. Designed to inspire and inform those interested in movie music.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CHICANO M102
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Theoretical and empirical overview of Chicana/Chicano educational issues in U.S., with special emphasis on disentangling effects of race, gender, class, and immigrant status on Chicana/Chicano educational attainment and achievement. Examination of how historical, social, political, and economic forces impact Chicana/Chicano educational experience.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: NURSING 50
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Epidemiology is interdisciplinary science with goal of identifying and describing patterns of disease occurrence, identifying determinants of disease, and evaluating disease prevention and health care treatment efforts. With its focus on human populations, epidemiology is directly linked with public health research, policy, and practice. Introduction to fundamental definitions, concepts, methods, and critical thinking used in epidemiologic study. Designed to lay foundation for future study to evaluate factors related to health outcomes in human populations using epidemiologic principles.

You must be a nursing major to enroll in this course. 

COURSE: ENVIRON 25
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Good food is healthy, sustainably produced, and culturally meaningful. Introduction to basic concepts and history of food systems, food science and nutrition, fair and sustainable food production, natural resources and environmental issues including climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and food policy and law, food distribution and access, cultural identity and artistic engagements with food.

COURSE: HLT POL 100
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Structure and function of U.S. health care system, health care policy, and issues and forces shaping its future.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: PSYCH 10
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Psychology 10 approaches psychology from a scientific orientation. Without such an orientation, you are given no means to evaluate nonscientific conceptions, no strategies for imposing order on the tangled web of data and theory encompassed by the field broadly called psychology. In this course greatest weight is assigned to psychological approaches that have legitimate scientific status. As we discuss the different topics that make up the discipline called “psychology,” we will evaluate them according to their scientific merit. General introduction including topics in cognitive, experimental, personality, developmental, social, and clinical psychology; six hours of psychological research and a grade of C or better required of all departmental premajors.

COURSE: DIS STD M139 / PSYCH M139
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Genealogy of autism as diagnostic category and cultural phenomenon from its historical roots as new, rare, and obscure condition in early 1940s to its current contested status as minority identity and/or global epidemic. Examination of material sourced from various fields and disciplines invested in autism, including psychology, neuroscience, arts and humanities, popular media, anthropology, activism, and critical autism studies. Students encounter and analyze multiple perspectives on autism and put them in conversation with one another. Attention paid to way people on spectrum define, explain, and represent their own experiences of autism and discussion of what ramifications of these multiple framings are in context of autism intervention strategy and disability policy today.

COURSE: COMM 100
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Pre-requisite: Course 10 or Linguistics 1 or Sociology 1 or Psychology 10.

Examination of fundamental principles in human communication science. Topics include models of communication, levels of analysis in the behavioral sciences, cultural evolution, new media and big data, political communication, and the nature of art.

COURSE: ENGL 4W
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36.

Introduction to literary analysis, with close reading and carefully written exposition of selections from principal modes of literature: poetry, prose fiction, and drama. Minimum of 15 to 20 pages of revised writing.

COURSE: ASIA AM 10
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Multidisciplinary examination of history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in U.S. Throughout the course students will learn about how intersecting formations of race, class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship, among other identities, forged the experiences of Asian Americans. As a result, students will come away with a greater appreciation for the diversity and complexity of the history and contemporary conditions of Asian Americans.

COURSE: ENGL 20W
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing Requirement – English Composition 3

Designed to introduce fundamentals of creative writing and writing workshop experience. Emphasis on poetry, fiction, drama, or creative nonfiction depending on wishes of instructor(s) during any given term. Readings from assigned texts, weekly writing assignments (multiple drafts and revisions), and final portfolio required. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 20.

COURSE: PHILOS 31
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Recommended for students who plan to pursue more advanced studies in logic. Elements of symbolic logic, sentential and quantificational; forms of reasoning and structure of language.

COURSE: ENGL M138
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introductory workshop in genre(s) of instructor choice, that may include mixed genres, playwriting, screenwriting, literary nonfiction, or others.

COURSE: COMM 157
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Analysis of how following personal lives of media-created celebrities impacts self-esteem, connectedness, and personal relationships from cultural studies and social sciences perspectives, and how entities cultivate celebrity for financial gain. Topics include celebrity gossip and privacy, news sharing, public relations, and impact of social media on fan support, image construction, and damage control.

COURSE: ETHNMUS M107
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introduction to development of rap music and hip-hop culture, with emphasis on musical and verbal qualities, philosophical and political ideologies, gender representation, and influences on cinema and popular culture. P/NP or letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: SOCIOL 101
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Comparative survey of basic concepts and theories in sociology from 1850 to 1920.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ASIA AM 10
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Multidisciplinary examination of history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in U.S. Throughout the course students will learn about how intersecting formations of race, class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship, among other identities, forged the experiences of Asian Americans. As a result, students will come away with a greater appreciation for the diversity and complexity of the history and contemporary conditions of Asian Americans.

COURSE: POL SCI 40
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Basic institutions and processes of democratic politics. Treatment of themes such as constitutionalism, representation, participation, and leadership coupled with particular emphasis on the American case.

COURSE: URBN PL 120
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Survey of urban history and evolution in U.S., urban social theory, current growth trends, system of cities, urban economy and economic restructuring, traditional and alternative location theories, urban transportation, and residential location and segregation.

COURSE: GENDER M114 / LGBTQS M114
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introduction to history, politics, culture, and scientific study of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgendered, and queer people; examination of sexuality and gender as categories for investigation; interdisciplinary theories and research on minority sexualities and genders.

COURSE: SOCIOL 20
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introduction to methods used in contemporary sociological research, with focus on issues of research design, data collection, and analysis of data.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: PSYCH 10
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Psychology 10 approaches psychology from a scientific orientation. Without such an orientation, you are given no means to evaluate nonscientific conceptions, no strategies for imposing order on the tangled web of data and theory encompassed by the field broadly called psychology. In this course greatest weight is assigned to psychological approaches that have legitimate scientific status. As we discuss the different topics that make up the discipline called “psychology,” we will evaluate them according to their scientific merit. General introduction including topics in cognitive, experimental, personality, developmental, social, and clinical psychology; six hours of psychological research and a grade of C or better required of all departmental premajors.

COURSE: URBN PL M140
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Examination of key issues (work, housing, and neighborhoods) in urban poverty, with particular focus on Mexican and Central American immigrant populations in Los Angeles. Exploration of major theoretical models that explain urban poverty and application of them in comparative context while exploring differences between Mexican and Central American immigrants. Social conditions and forces that help us understand lives of poor people in comparative context while looking at differences between two major Latino-origin populations in Los Angeles. Critical analysis of new forms of urban poverty in contemporary American society.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CHICANO M102
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Theoretical and empirical overview of Chicana/Chicano educational issues in U.S., with special emphasis on disentangling effects of race, gender, class, and immigrant status on Chicana/Chicano educational attainment and achievement. Examination of how historical, social, political, and economic forces impact Chicana/Chicano educational experience.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DIS STD M139 / PSYCH M139
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Genealogy of autism as diagnostic category and cultural phenomenon from its historical roots as new, rare, and obscure condition in early 1940s to its current contested status as minority identity and/or global epidemic. Examination of material sourced from various fields and disciplines invested in autism, including psychology, neuroscience, arts and humanities, popular media, anthropology, activism, and critical autism studies. Students encounter and analyze multiple perspectives on autism and put them in conversation with one another. Attention paid to way people on spectrum define, explain, and represent their own experiences of autism and discussion of what ramifications of these multiple framings are in context of autism intervention strategy and disability policy today.

COURSE: SOCIOL 182
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Contributions of sociology to study of politics, including analysis of political aspects of social systems, social context of action, and social bases of power. P/NP or letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: PSYCH 119Y
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Broad overview of scientific study of sexual behavior, with emphases on evolutionary, biological, psychological, and social considerations. Topics include historical antecedents of sex research, evolution of sex, influence of sex hormones on brain and behavior, sexual development, and roles of genes and hormones on sexual orientation.

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: PSYCH 115. 

COURSE: SOCIOL 156
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Role of race and ethnicity in the U.S., including interplay between racial and ethnic structures and meanings. Special attention to comparison of African American and European American experiences and to transformation of Asian American and Latino communities and the nation generally, wrought by renewal of mass migration in second half of the 20th century. P/NP or letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MATH 131A
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Pre-requisite: MATH 32B and 33B.

Rigorous introduction to foundations of real analysis; real numbers, point set topology in Euclidean space, functions, continuity.

COURSE: EPS SCI 15
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

General introduction to geological, physical, chemical, and biological processes and history of Earth’s global ocean system.

Pre-Requisite: MATH 31A

COURSE: NEUROSC 10
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, four hours. Preparation: high school background in either biology or chemistry. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M101A (or Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M175A or Physiological Science M180A or Psychology M117A) or Physiological Science 111A or Psychology 115. General overview and introduction to most exciting and fundamental topics encompassing field of neuroscience. P/NP or letter grading.

COURSE: ENVIRON 163
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Examination of role of business in mitigating environmental degradation and incentives to be more environmentally responsive. Emphasis on corporate strategies that deliver value to shareholders while responding to environmental concerns.

COURSE: EPS SCI 17
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; one optional field trip. Designed for nonmajors. Exploration of biology, evolution, and extinction of dinosaurs and close relatives, in context of history of biosphere. Information from paleontology, biology, and geology. P/NP or letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENVIRON 140
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Introduction to environmental policy and regulation in U.S. Provides basic knowledge and skills needed to work as professional environmental problem solver. Exploration of environmental harms that are subject to regulation, role of science in informing policy and regulation, evolution of environmental regulation, different types of regulatory instruments, regulatory process, and alternative approaches to environmental decision making. Includes California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), Proposition 65, California’s long-standing leadership role in air pollution control, and state’s pioneering efforts in regulating greenhouse gas emissions. P/NP or letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENVIRON 25
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Good food is healthy, sustainably produced, and culturally meaningful. Introduction to basic concepts and history of food systems, food science and nutrition, fair and sustainable food production, natural resources and environmental issues including climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and food policy and law, food distribution and access, cultural identity and artistic engagements with food.

COURSE: EPS SCI 1
CREDITS: 5 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Elements of Earth science; study of Earth materials; nature and interpretation of geologic evidence; study of geologic processes; historical aspects of geology. Mandatory field trips introduce students to solving of geologic problems in field.

Students will be required to attend lectures and laboratories. Additional lab fees apply.

COURSE: ARCH&UD CM153 / ENVIRON M153
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Relationship of built environment to natural environment through whole systems approach, with focus on sustainable design of buildings and planning of communities. Emphasis on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and appropriate use of resources, including materials, water, and land.  

COURSE: MATH 115
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Pre-requisite: MATH 33A.

Techniques of proof, abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, and matrices; determinants; inner product spaces; eigenvector theory.

COURSE: MIMG 6
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Lecture, four hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 101. Designed for nonscience students; introduction to biology of microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, protozoa, algae, fungi), their significance as model systems for understanding fundamental cellular processes, and their role in human affairs. P/NP or letter grading.

COURSE: PSYCH 119Y
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Broad overview of scientific study of sexual behavior, with emphases on evolutionary, biological, psychological, and social considerations. Topics include historical antecedents of sex research, evolution of sex, influence of sex hormones on brain and behavior, sexual development, and roles of genes and hormones on sexual orientation.

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: PSYCH 115. 

COURSE: EPS SCI 9
CREDITS: 4 US Credits
OFFERED: Session A

Properties of sun, planets, asteroids, and comets. Astronomical observations relevant to understanding solar system and its origin. Dynamical problems, including examination of fallacious hypotheses. Meteoritic evidence regarding earliest history of solar system. Chemical models of solar nebula. Space exploration and its planning.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus

COVID Safe Travel

The health and safety of our students is our highest priority. We take our duty of care for our students, their families and our Australian University partners seriously. For all of our program locations, we have developed a site-specific COVID-19 risk matrix and risk management and emergency response plans so that health and safety response protocols are monitored, managed and communicated.

In preparation for your overseas program, it’s important that you carefully read and understand information related to COVID-19 Travel Safety and Insurance Requirements.

CISaustralia monitors Smartraveller and reliable news feeds to keep up to date with the latest COVID information and any associated travel restrictions and entry requirements for all destinations where we have programs. Due to the constantly evolving COVID-19 situation, Government travel advice can change quickly. For the most up to date information on the United States, visit the Smartraveller website.

Excursions

The Office of Residential Life may organise optional trips and activities on weekends and evenings (at additional expense). Students can also arrange their own trips to places such as Disneyland, Magic Mountain, Universal Studios, Catalina Island or even Las Vegas, San Francisco and the Grand Canyon.  There are local attractions such as the beach, movie nights, baseball games, bowling alleys and outlet mall shopping excursions.

The CISaustralia Site Director will also welcome you to LA and help you settle in. Our friendly Site Director will be there to meet you at the airport and take you out for a welcome lunch/dinner. The Site Director will also be available to provide advice on local cultural activities, such as attending a baseball or basketball game, visit to the J. Paul “Getty” Museum, Santa Monica pier walking tours, and other similar outings.

Location

UCLA lies at the heart of one of the most dynamic cities in the world – Los Angeles.

Bordered by iconic neighbourhoods – Bel Air, Brentwood, Beverly Hills – UCLA is a crossroads of ideas, cultures, opportunities and limitless experiences.

UCLA is located in Westwood in the northern central portion of the Westside region of LA. From its hip arts district to fine dining, the Westside is home to many of LA’s best restaurants, high-end shopping, eclectic boutiques and superb cultural and historic attractions.

LA is arguably the entertainment capital of the world, a cultural mecca boasting more than 300 museums and a paradise of good weather. With a multitude of tourist attractions, great career opportunities, amazing restaurants and entertainment galore – LA is simply the place to be.

A few facts about the city of LA:

  • It is the only city in North America to have hosted the Summer Olympics twice.
  • LA County, with more than 87,000 jobs in the fashion industry, has surpassed New York’s fashion district workforce.
  • The LA five-county area also has more than 700,000 people at work in health services/biomedical activities and 190,000 people in aerospace/technology.
  • The city of LA is home to 3.8 million people, growing to 9.8 million if considering the County of LA.
  • LA is an international destination city that is a hub of creativity in the arts and business.
  • LA is filled with vibrant neighbourhoods and ethnic communities, including Chinatown, Koreatown and Little India.

Westwood Village – Home of UCLA

Located just south of the UCLA campus, Westwood Village is designed with students in mind. It has three major supermarkets and dozens of restaurants and cafés. Among its movie theatres is the Mann Village Theatre, which hosts frequent Hollywood movie premieres. A playhouse and museum are also part of the mix. Just a few minutes away by bus you can visit the Getty Centre (a museum famous for its art collection, architecture, and commanding views of Los Angeles). Admission is free.

Nearby:

Once a sleepy beach town, Santa Monica is now a vibrant city between UCLA and the coast. In addition to Santa Monica’s beaches and the famed Santa Monica Pier, you can take a walk on Main Street, lined with art galleries and shops or the Third Street Promenade, a pedestrian district with restaurants, more than 200 shops, a farmers market and street performers.

Beverly Hills – Just a couple of kilometres from UCLA you’ll find the tree-lined boulevards of Beverly Hills and Rodeo Drive. If shopping and locating star homes isn’t your thing, you can take in a movie screening at the Museum of Television and Radio.

Venice – Famous for its beachfront boardwalk, Venice is home to Muscle Beach and always some colourful characters. This beach resort, complete with a casino and a pier full of restaurants, remains a great place for playing and people watching.

Beyond Los Angeles – When you are at UCLA, you don’t have far to go to explore the rest of California. To the east is the desert – try your hand at climbing the rocks at Joshua Tree National Park. To the south, you can surf the beaches of Orange and San Diego counties. Head north on Highway 1 for unforgettable ocean views, enjoy lunch in Santa Barbara and perhaps continue north and explore the streets and bridges of San Francisco, the Napa Valley vineyards and breathtaking Yosemite National Park.

Attractions:

Rodeo Drive – The internationally known shopping destination anchored by Tiffany, Bulgari, Armani and other high-end retailers.

Third Street Promenade, Santa Monica – An attractive pedestrian district in beachside Santa Monica, complete with shops, restaurants and street performers.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the La Brea Tar Pits – The county museum of art has an extensive collection, special exhibits and frequent cultural events, including free jazz on Friday evenings. Next door, visit the La Brea Tar Pits, where stone-age animals became entrapped in pools of asphalt!

Venice Beach – A beautiful stretch of beach and ocean with a boardwalk that is home to an eclectic group of artists and performers.

Dodger Stadium – Home to the Dodgers, LA’s professional baseball team. Head to the stadium to eat popcorn and hot dogs while you cheer on the Big Blue!

Universal City Walk – A collection of restaurants, shops, cinemas and music clubs located within Universal Studios.

The Getty Centre – A nearby museum that is famously admired for its art collection, architecture and commanding view of LA. Admission is free.

Griffith Park – The largest city park in the US with many attractions, including an observatory, a train museum and even a pony ride!

Hollywood and Highland – At this famous corner you’ll find several famous Hollywood landmarks: Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, the Hollywood Walk of Fame (see the stars of our Aussies Nicole Kidman, Cate Blanchett and Hugh Jackman), and the Kodak Theatre (now known as Dolby Theatre and home to the Academy Awards ceremonies, ‘the Oscars’).

Disneyland in nearby Anaheim is Walt Disney’s original theme park. This is a favourite destination for students and pretty much most people that visit LA. The UCLA residential halls organise visits to Disneyland for students in the ‘summer’ session. Pop on those Mickey Mouse ears and get ready to experience Adventureland, Frontierland, Fantasyland and Tomorrowland… you get the picture!

The University

UCLA is a university built on optimism – this can-do perspective has brought them 12 Nobel Prizes, 12 Rhodes Scholarships, more National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) titles than any university and more Olympic medals than most nations. The faculty and alumni helped create the Internet and pioneered reverse osmosis. Not to mention more than 100 companies have been created based on technology developed at UCLA.

The UCLA campus is in a superb location with accessible and economical transport available to explore the region. The campus is well maintained, the facilities world class and the student body welcoming.

As a UCLA ‘summer’ (July) session student you have hundreds of academic courses to choose from, high standard on-campus accommodation and full access to the university facilities, including multiple libraries and two recreation centres – the John Wooden Centre and the Sunset Canyon Recreation Centre. Combined, the recreation centres offer hundreds of fitness classes and activities. Your options stretch from individual use of workout equipment and swimming pools to participation in fitness classes, yoga and martial arts – not to mention basketball courts, athletic tracks, volleyball courts and a rock climbing wall. For access to UCLA Recreation Services, you will need a valid student card (BruinCard) which we will assist you to apply for.

There are several ATMs located throughout campus. Bank ATMs give access to the Star, Plus or Cirrus networks, so you can often use these ATMs on a network arrangement to withdraw funds. There is also a post office, hair salon, multiple computer labs and several libraries – all just a short walk from your accommodation.

Wireless internet access is available in select locations on-campus for users with an eligible UCLA Login ID and appropriate wireless network interface card. There are also cable TV and computer network connections in each room of the on-campus accommodation.

UCLA have on-campus security – at designated times, free of charge you can be walked or dropped to different buildings on campus –and also the campus and surrounds are patrolled by the University of California Police Department. Exterior doors of residence halls and suites are locked and equipped with alarms. Your student card (BruinCard) lets you in.

Westwood Village is within walking distance to the campus where you will find many shops and some great eateries and restaurants. A large shopping mall that sells electronics, linen and furnishings is about 15 minutes by bus from UCLA.

Your student ID is called your ‘BruinCard’ and it is your passport to life at UCLA. It serves many purposes and the convenience of all the included features makes it a must-have necessity. You will receive this card once you arrive at UCLA.

BruinCard features and functions include:

  • Official university ID
  • Pre-paid debit feature can be used for purchases at campus stores and restaurants and at select local merchants
  • Library card to check out materials and pay for copies and printing
  • Campus gym and recreational facilities pass
  • Access card for on-campus housing residential buildings
  • Meal card for meal swipes at any of the residential restaurants in on-campus housing
  • Laundry card for all university housing facilities
  • Transportation card for discounted fares

Note: Bruin is an Old English word used for brown bears. The Bruin is the mascot of the sports teams of the UCLA.

Accommodation

The university provides comfortably furnished residence halls within easy walking distance of classrooms, libraries, swimming pools and recreational facilities.

The residence halls offered for the ‘Summer’ (July) sessions are new or renovated – students love the atmosphere and location. Most of the accommodation is elevated overlooking the campus. Accommodation is offered on a first in best dressed scenario, so be sure to apply well ahead of our deadline so we can confirm your accommodation placement.

On-Campus Residence Halls:

Residence Hall rooms are shared by  three students. Each room is carpeted and includes a twin bed, desk, chair, bookcase, cupboard and drawer space for each student. Students live on coed floors with designated male and female community restrooms with private showers located on each floor. There are also cable TV and computer network connections in each room. There are coin operated laundry facilities on each floor of the halls. A refrigerator rental service is available to students when they arrive. The Halls of Residence accommodation package includes 14 meals per week (and can be used at breakfast and dinner).

Upon arrival, each resident is provided with one set of bed linens, a pillow, blanket, towel and washcloth for use during their ‘summer’.

The Office of Residential Life organises evening entertainment for students staying in on-campus housing. Information about the events is posted around the buildings. Special events like movie nights, barbecues, dances and organised trips to places of interest in Southern California are planned for residents throughout the summer.

Other Amenities 
A refrigerator rental service is available to students when they arrive. Coin-operated laundry facilities are located on each floor of the halls. If you choose to purchase a television, basic cable television service is provided to all rooms.

Dining Services 
The fees for Residence Halls include meals (14 per week) at various student dining halls, which begin with dinner on the Sunday evening before classes start and end on the last Friday of check-out.

Smoking
UCLA is smoke-free! Smoking in housing, classrooms and all campus facilities is prohibited.

Program Fee & Dates

Session 1: June-July 2024 (3 weeks)
Application Deadline29 April 2024
Arrival Date23 June 2024
Departure Date13 July 2024
Application FeeA$ 95
Program Fee A$ 8,599
OS-HELP A$ 7,921
Session A: June-July 2024 (6 weeks)
Application Deadline29 April 2024
Arrival Date23 June 2024
Departure Date03 August 2024
Application FeeA$ 95
Program Fee A$ 13,599
OS-HELP A$ 7,921

 

Program fees include the following:
  • CISaustralia support services before, during and after the program
  • Academic advising
  • Financial advice
  • Assistance with travel arrangements
  • Medical insurance
  • Pre-departure guide and session
  • Airport pick-up (on specified program arrival date within designated arrival times)
  • Accommodation for duration of program (triple shared rooms)
  • Welcome dinner
  • A meal plan of 14 meals per week
  • Tuition fees (1 course for 3-week sessions / 2 courses for 6-week session)
  • All additional UCLA registration, orientation and document fees
  • On-campus internet
  • Access to gym, pool, library, multiple eateries
  • Weekly cultural newsletters on various US topics
  • Program risk matrix and COVID-19 risk assessment
  • Risk Management and Emergency Response Plan
  • CISaustralia 24/7 on-site support – Site Director
  • UCLA official transcript
  • CISaustralia Certificate of Participation (available on request)

A comprehensive online pre-arrival orientation will be provided to help answer any questions you may have about UCLA, Los Angeles, campus resources and more. You are required to complete all modules of the UCLA orientation by the Friday before the beginning of your session start date

What is not included:

  • Program application fee
  • International Student Identity Card
  • Flights (CISaustralia will however provide travel guidance and support via our formal travel partner)
  • Travel insurance
  • Visa fees*
  • Vaccinations (if required)
  • Additional Meals (unless mentioned above)
  • Extra travel/excursions (other than those mentioned above)

*Students should expect to pay approx. US$800 for their student visa, in addition to attending an in-person interview in Sydney, Melbourne or Perth. The visa fee of approx. US$800 includes 3 different components – Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) fee of US$350, the reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee of US$280 – US$300 and a non-immigrant visa application fee (MRV fee) of US$185. US Government student visa fees are regulated by the US Government and are subject to change without notice. CISaustralia cannot charge or collect fees for the US student visa.

Note: Students could opt to undertake more than 8 US credits on the 6-week session, however, there would be an additional tuition charge for this. CISaustralia would not recommend a study load any larger than 8 US credits (typically 2 courses) during your 6-week program.

Please note that additional lab, service fees and/or additional credit fees may apply to your UCLA enrolment in July. These fees will be charged by UCLA to CISaustralia (after your arrival at UCLA), who will in turn pass these fees onto each CISaustralia student. Additional lab fees will not normally apply to standard courses in business or humanities. Additional fees could be applied for the following:

1. Students will be charged additional tuition fees for any additional credits studied over and above the standard 8 US credits for the 6-week program, and/or

2. Laboratory fees that might be associated with lab classes. Lab fees are likely to exist for science, engineering (or similar) related courses. Lab fees are not included in the standard program fee and students might expect to pay an additional amount of approx. AUD$600 per course (fees fluctuate per course and are implemented by UCLA without discussion or negotiation).

Students are required to pay for any additional lab or credit fees, and will be invoiced by CISaustralia at the end of the UCLA add/drop period. Students should select courses carefully and note the US credit weighting for each course. The 6-week program at UCLA only includes 8 US credits (normally 2 x 4 US credit courses). Students who choose courses with a higher US credit weighting, i.e. more than 8 US credits for two courses, will be charged at approx. $450 per additional US credit (pending current exchange rates). This fee will be calculated after the student’s first week at UCLA (the UCLA add / drop period) and CISaustralia will invoice all students directly after week one of the program for any additional US credits or lab fees. UCLA transcripts will be available once all fees have been paid in full to CISaustralia.

Any additional fees incurred while onsite (e.g. UCLA Health Services) need to be paid by students through their MyUCLA account before the program ends. Transcripts will be held until payment is made and processed.

Dates are for reference only and are subject to change. Please do not book flights until you have received the confirmed dates in your acceptance paperwork.

CISaustralia reserves the right to alter fees at any time due to currency fluctuations and/or fee changes made by our partner universities.

Adventure Awaits

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