Business and Law Courses

Study abroad in Business or Law and set yourself apart. Expand your horizons while enhancing your resume. An increasing amount of employers prefer applicants with overseas experience. Globalise your degree by taking courses abroad in Accounting, Economics, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Hospitality, Legal Studies, Management, Marketing, Tourism and much more!
FILTER BY
Program Types:
  • January Study
  • July Study
  • Language Study
Countries:
  • Belize
  • Cambodia
  • Canada
  • China & Hong Kong
  • Costa Rica
  • England
  • Fiji
  • France
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Nepal
  • Netherlands
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Scotland
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • Uganda
  • USA
  • Vietnam
  • Zambia
Area of Study:
  • Business and Law
    • Accounting and Finance
    • Economics
    • Hospitality, Tourism and Culinary Arts
    • International Business and Entrepreneurship
    • Law, Legal Studies and Criminal Justice
    • Management and Human Resources
    • Marketing and Advertising

Need a recommendation? Contact us and we can assist you in finding the right program.

ENQUIRE NOW
Available Courses by Program
COURSE: ACCTG 102
CREDITS: 15 points

Basic principles and concepts of accounting that underlie the production of information for internal and external reporting. This course provides the technical platform for second year courses in financial and management accounting, finance, and accounting information systems.

COURSE: BUSINESS 114
CREDITS: 15 points

Examines how understanding financial, non-financial and legal information is critical to business decision making. Considers the accounting and legal requirements, issues and mechanisms that impact management of an organisation. Develops skills in analysing, interpreting and communicating accounting information.

COURSE: LAWPUBL 467
CREDITS: 15 points

The global significance of corruption and its implications for self-government are explored within the context of rising economic and political inequality and illiberal populism. This course asks whether anti-corruption law can respond to democracy’s vulnerabilities and decline. It examines current economic and political trends, anti-corruption law domestically and internationally, and the potential for enhancing the law to better-protect political integrity.

COURSE: INTBUS 151
CREDITS: 15 points

Business on a global scale presents unique challenges and unrivalled opportunities to companies equipped to cross national boundaries. Set against a background of current events, the course explores the influence of international trade and multinational corporations on the contemporary global economy.

COURSE: BUSINESS 151G
CREDITS: 15 points

Communication knowledge and skills are essential in business careers and for interpersonal and intercultural relationships. This course offers a theory-based approach combined with applied communication practices. Communication knowledge, competencies and skills are developed through exploring relationships, mediated communication, writing, team dynamics, oral presentation and technologies.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LAWCOMM 457
CREDITS: 15 points

An in-depth examination of selected aspects of consumer law, including (but not limited to) misleading and deceptive conduct, other unfair practices, unfair contract terms in standard form consumer contracts, consumer guarantees and uninvited direct sales.

COURSE: ACCTG 221
CREDITS: 15 points

Budgets and standards, costing systems, cost information for decision-making and control, performance appraisal, and contemporary related issues.

COURSE: STATS 208
CREDITS: 15 points

A practical course in the statistical analysis of data. There is a heavy emphasis in this course on the interpretation and communication of statistical findings. Topics such as exploratory data analysis, the analysis of linear models including two-way analysis of variance, experimental design and multiple regression, the analysis of contingency table data including logistic regression, the analysis of time series data, and model selection will be covered.

COURSE: INFOSYS 222
CREDITS: 15 points

Managers and other knowledge workers find that many of their duties revolve around accessing, organising, and presenting organisational and external information. The ability to develop and use computer databases is becoming a critical skill that is required in many disciplines. These skills are developed through an introduction to data modelling, relational theory, database design, and the management of databases.

COURSE: INFOSYS 110
CREDITS: 15 points

Explores how information systems and analytical tools help organisations to innovate, optimise and deliver value. Examines how the development and implementation of systems and technologies coordinate and manage information, people, and processes within data governance and privacy frameworks.

COURSE: LAWPUBL 445
CREDITS: 15 points

The law related to the European Union and its institutional, economic and social structure as well as the general economic and political implications of the present status of the European Union.

COURSE: FINANCE 251
CREDITS: 15 points

Focuses on practical aspects of corporate finance. Topics covered include: concepts of value creation, risk and required rates of return, financial maths, capital budgeting, capital structure and dividend policies.

COURSE: LAWENVIR 420
CREDITS: 15 points

Concepts, principles, customs, and treaties of international law as related to the protection of the global environment including: prevention of pollution, protection of the marine environment, ozone layer protection, climate change, biodiversity, the UNCED process and the legal framework for sustainable development.

COURSE: LAWGENRL 438
CREDITS: 15 points

An examination of the law and the policy considerations that relate to residential housing including: the historical development and current state of residential tenancy protection legislation; the relationship between social policy and housing regulation; human rights and social equity considerations; economic measures to achieve government policy objectives for housing; regulating the private rental market; property rights and security of tenure issues; ‘consumer protection’ measures to ensure safe and habitable housing; housing and natural disasters; retirement housing; new forms of housing ownership; and dispute resolution.

COURSE: LAWCOMM 437
CREDITS: 15 points

An examination of the common governance structures employed by iwi, why those structures are chosen and the legal and practical issues that arise as a result. Aspects of the law related to trusts, limited partnerships, charities and Māori Authorities, and how they may be interwoven within one overarching structure.

COURSE: LAW 121G
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to theories of the nature, functions and origins of law and legal systems, including sources of law; comparative concepts of law; an overview of constitutional and legal arrangements in New Zealand, including the role of the courts; the operation of the legal system in historical and contemporary New Zealand with a focus on concepts of property rights, the Treaty of Waitangi, Treaty Settlements and proposals for constitutional change.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

COURSE: COMLAW 101
CREDITS: 15 points

Decision makers in commerce and industry require an understanding of legal structures, concepts and obligations. Provides an introduction to the New Zealand legal system and the legal environment in which businesses operate, and also introduces legal concepts of property and the law of obligations, including detailed study of various forms of legal liability relevant to business.

COURSE: MKTG 202
CREDITS: 15 points

Focuses on the critical role and importance of information in marketing. Covers the fundamental concepts of marketing research in traditional and digital environments and examines how these can be used to assist companies in their decision-making.

COURSE: ECON 201
CREDITS: 15 points

Study of the allocation of scarce resources among competing end uses. Intermediate-level analysis of the economic behaviour of individual units, in particular consumers and firms. Although the focus is on perfectly competitive markets, attention is also given to other types of markets. Analysis also includes concepts of expected utility and uncertainty, and welfare economics.

COURSE: ECON 152
CREDITS: 15 points

Analysis of issues that affect our daily lives, including pricing decisions by firms and their impact on our cost of living; game theory and strategic decision-making; tackling problems of pollution and global warming; and how governments use monetary and fiscal policies to stimulate economic growth and address unemployment and inequality.

Prerequisite: BUSINESS 115 or ECON 151 or 16 credits in NCEA Level 3 Economics with a Merit average including standard 91399 (Demonstrate understanding of the efficiency of market equilibrium), or a scholarship pass in Economics, or B grade in CIE Economics or 4 out of 7 in Economics (HL) in IB

COURSE: LAWGENRL 457
CREDITS: 15 points

The rise of globalisation and technology has created complex litigation challenges for victims of mass harms nationally and internationally. This course examines comparative theoretical, ideological and economic policies which underpin complex litigation systems with a particular focus on the use of regulatory actions, class actions and litigation funding entities. It also examines major procedural and substantive issues that arise in the context of national and international complex civil litigation.

COURSE: STATS 108
CREDITS: 15 points

The standard Stage I Statistics course for the Faculty of Business and Economics or for Arts students taking Economics courses. Its syllabus is as for STATS 101, but it places more emphasis on examples from commerce.

COURSE: MGMT 302
CREDITS: 15 points

Examines the processes of formulating and implementing strategies, and the critical thinking behind the multifaceted role of organisations in complex business environments. Focuses on strategy issues in and between a range of commercial and public organisations, from entrepreneurial firms to multinational corporations.

COURSE: MKTG 203
CREDITS: 15 points

A comprehensive overview of the central principles and concepts of marketing strategy and management. Highlights the challenges that marketing managers face in planning and implementing effective marketing mix strategies.

COURSE: BUSINESS 111
CREDITS: 15 points

Business involves creating and capturing value through innovation and entrepreneurship. Develops an understanding of customers and markets, and the legal, economic and social environment within which business operates, nationally and globally. Develops personal and professional capabilities needed in business, including strategies to manage self and work effectively with others.

COURSE: MGMT 223
CREDITS: 15 points

Models of work organisation, reform and performance, including industrial and post-industrial forms of work. Employee responses to work and the employment relationship. Workforce diversity.

COURSE: ECON 151
CREDITS: 15 points

Economics affects our daily lives and the global environment in many ways. Through the media we are constantly made aware of price increases, interest rate changes, exchange rate movements and balance of payments problems, growth and recessions, standard of living comparisons, regional trading agreements. What does it all mean and how does it all work?

COURSE: MG 310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July: Session 1

The focus of this course is the analysis of how a business must adapt to different cultural contexts. For this purpose, we study the interaction between the culture and the company’s structure, processes and human resources. In this way, the student will be able to understand strategies used to optimise such interaction. The general objective of the course is to learn the main business practices in different cultures, through the analysis of the differences in various countries. This will provide the background to understand and identify threats and opportunities to do business in a global context.

COURSE: FTFCSF360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course addresses the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through lab practice gained by running a real enterprise in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Coursework includes site visits to well-known Italian luxury brands in Florence such as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPFBSM330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

The front of house area of any restaurant should be carefully planned in order to balance ambiance with function. Restaurant seating, wait stations, and waiting areas are just a few of the areas to consider when planning a restaurant dining room. The course focuses on all aspects that characterize the front of the house experience. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the front of the house to properly reflect the restaurant concept and the necessity of planning front of the house spaces for efficiency. Furthermore, the course considers the pivotal role of excellent customer service and the training methods of front of the house staff.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUMKIT320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Marketing or equivalent

This course further develops the main principles of marketing by exploring the strategic implications of marketing in different countries and cultures and identifying specific marketing techniques and the modifications necessary to accommodate cultural differences. Topics include global marketing, marketing planning, segmentation, culture and business customs, political and legal factors and restraints, economic and technological development, and the international monetary system. 

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MGMT-X 460.394
CREDITS: 4 US credits / Approx. 36 classroom contact hours

The Internet, the digital revolution, and the move toward an information-based economy are dramatically changing business and the way products are marketed and sold. To be more successful in this “new marketing world”, business people need to understand what is changing and how to use the new tools to their optimal advantage. This course is for both veteran marketers who want to understand the new tools available through the Internet, and those who are comfortable with Internet applications and the digital world but want to learn the marketing fundamentals as they apply to the Internet.

COURSE: MGMT-X 403.31
CREDITS: 4 US credits / Approx. 36 classroom contact hours

With the entertainment industry converging into a worldwide mass media, both business and operation models continue to rapidly evolve. This introductory course for producers, directors, writers, development personnel, and aspiring media executives examines the changing business issues associated with the entertainment industry. Through lectures, discussions with industry guests, and case studies, instruction focuses on current business and production issues, and introduces new business models to navigate content onto new distribution platforms. Some history is highlighted to provide a context for current practices and potential. The course also features opportunities to meet senior entertainment industry executives in various sectors. By the end of the course, students should have an understanding of the opportunities available in the business of entertainment.

COURSE: LGL3001
CREDITS: 7.5 ECTS credits / 36 contact hours

The environment knows no boundaries, while national legal systems do. It is therefore of the utmost importance to develop international law approaches in order to deal with transboundary and global environmental problems. While environmental law originally focused on local problems like smoke and noise, today we are confronted with transboundary and global environmental problems like the continuing loss of biodiversity, long-distance air-pollution, and the threat of climate change. The conservation of important nature,the sound condition of air, water and soil, and the environmental safety of products and economic activities are core concerns.

Law serves as an important instrument to improve and protect the environment. The course International Environmental Law (IEL) discusses the role of international law – and the emerging body of global environmental law – in order to protect the environment. It takes a fundamental approach which means that we will examine environmental law from the perspective of principles, environmental rights, and the choice and design of regulatory instruments. Both strengths and, unfortunately, weaknesses will be discussed. As far as international law falling short, the importance of national approaches and private initiatives will be addressed. Some specific attention will go to the European Union as a regional international organisation addressing, inter alia, environmental problems. The world-wide problem of climate change serves as the leading case of this course.

This intensive course includes:

  • Weekend excursion to Brussels – visits to the European Parliament & Parlementarium, and the European Commission (to be confirmed)
  • Weekend excursion to The Hague and Amsterdam – visits to the International Court of Justice, Greenpeace headquarters, International Union for the Conservation of Nature (to be confirmed)
CREDITS: 7.5 ECTS credits / 48 hours

This course covers a variety of topics including: Entrepreneurship in Europe, Introduction to Social Business, Business Planning, Disruptive Methods, Entrepreneurial Failure and Success, Pan-European Business Development as Entry Strategy, Business Model Generation, Digital Strategy, Cross-Cultural Management, and Company / Corporate Visits.

CREDITS: 7.5 ECTS credits / 48 hours

This course covers a variety of topics including: Luxury Brand Concepts, Luxury Markets, Understanding the Consumer Worldwide, Retail Marketing, Brand Strategy, Disruptive Methods, Distribution in the Luxury Industry, Champagne & Wine Business, and Cross-Cultural Management.

CREDITS: 3 North American credits / 39 lecture hours + excursions

This immersive course is comprised of 2 Modules and offers a powerful understanding of how to successfully manage a service business with practical, hands-on training in writing and presentations. The objective of this program is to introduce students to service management concepts and literature to build their abilities to improve service in any business setting. Since communication is a key component of service delivery, significant time is spent learning and practicing spoken and written communication.

Module 1: Business Communications
Student’s capabilities in written communication, oral presentation and non-verbal communication are developed and enhanced within a business and management context. Report and technical writing, presentation preparation, public speaking, business etiquette, negotiation skills, time management and inter-personal communication skills are among the topics emphasised. The IWIBM integrates business communications with service management and students will make presentations on the core business challenges discussed in service management.

Module 2: Service Management
This module helps students to understand how service organisations can best design themselves for effective and professional customer service. Company visits and guest speakers are arranged to help students better understand the theories.

Cultural activities include team building, sightseeing tour and a ski trip to Mt. Washington Alpine Resort. The aim is to help students become familiar with Canadian culture and society, enhance their social communication skills, experience service in the hospitality sector first-hand, apply what they learn in class to everyday life, and enjoy Vancouver Island.

COURSE: MG 315
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1

No other institutions have permeated multiple cultures more than the multinational corporations like IBM, Microsoft, Nestle, BASF, etc. With this permeation, managers from many different cultures are relocated to new and alien cultures. More and more decisions made by future global managers will need to be assessed in terms of an understanding of the multiple cultures the decisions will affect. Future global managers can only do this by knowing how different cultural business ethics are derived, tested, and used. This course has as its purpose the introductory exploration of business ethics in a cross-cultural setting. This can no better be achieved than in a foreign culture where the students can immediately receive information from their surroundings and managers who have had to face the difficult decisions in the past.

CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course will examine various aspects of the relationship between food, culture and society in the Mediterranean basin, where eating is not a simple act of survival but rather a cultural and social activity. Looking at the local culture through the lens of food allows us to discover and understand social constructs, values and even the history of Europe, from ancient Greece to the great chefs of the 21st century such as Ferran Adrià. Through this we will discover the similarities and differences between how the Spanish, Italian and Greece societies work.

In this course we offer a cross-cultural perspective that will focus on history, anthropology, sociology, literature, gastronomy and the business that works behind the food industry.

COURSE: MK 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 2

International marketing is more than a simple application of marketing principles to more than one country. In a world that becomes increasingly globalised, marketing strategies become absolutely essential. Both global and international marketing are attached to each other. On one hand, international marketing involves the firm in making one or more marketing mix decisions across national boundaries. On the other hand, global marketing involves the firm in establishing manufacturing facilities overseas and coordinating marketing strategies across the globe. Cross-cultural differences have an important role in both internal and external ways.

This course provides the knowledge of the fundamental concepts of international marketing from a European perspective. It is organised so that each class is either a lecture or a case discussion. In this course you will learn to look at international marketing problems through the lens of an analytical framework.

COURSE: MG 310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July: Session 1

The focus of this course is the analysis of how a business must adapt to different cultural contexts. For this purpose, we study the interaction between the culture and the company’s structure, processes and human resources. In this way, the student will be able to understand strategies used to optimise such interaction. The general objective of the course is to learn the main business practices in different cultures, through the analysis of the differences in various countries. This will provide the background to understand and identify threats and opportunities to do business in a global context.

COURSE: IB 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

The focus of this course is the study of the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial start-up process. Areas of concentration include the search for new venture opportunities, evaluation of the viability and attractiveness of the new venture; determining the resources required and the sources of those resources; preparation of financial statements addressing cash flow, valuation and investment justifications; and the development of a business plan appropriate for presentation to funding sources.

The course is also designed to be an experiential learning experience. During the course, students will work in teams to to design and test a business venture of their choosing, by applying the concepts learnt in class and tackling the challenges they encounter. This course may appeal to business and non-business majors alike, as well as to individuals who want to launch their own business in the future, pursue employment in the start-up world, or work in venture capital or entrepreneurial support.

COURSE: CPCRCM360 / HPHTCM360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and La Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been produced and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropolises and developing destinations will be examined.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPBT320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course introduces students to baking and pastry fundamentals through an analysis of the features and functions of the main pastry ingredients. The course starts with a complete overview of eggs, flour, fats, sugar, and dairy products in order to create a basis on which all future courses will develop. Students will approach the basic mixing and cooking methods in order to understand the baking process with all its possible variations. Special emphasis will be placed on short crust pastry, pate choux, enriched dough, and stirred custards. Upon successful completion of the course, students will gain confidence in the production of sponge cake, pound cake, pastry and English cream, and basic short crust dough. Students will be able to describe and produce the main meringues.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPSB350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Since ancient times bread has had a significance that goes beyond mere sustenance. Almost every society in the world eats bread in some form and bread has always been considered a symbol of life for all mankind. Bread celebrates life and plays a leading role in traditional celebrations and festivities. This course focuses on traditional Italian specialty breads, made with special, or alternative flours, shaped by local folklore and passed down from generation to generation like the most precious gift. Students will be introduced to natural yeast production and learn how to keep the yeast alive and strengthen it for better leavening as well as the nutritional advantages and flavor development thanks to its use. The course offers a complete survey of traditional specialty breads, specialty flatbreads, sweet breads and rolls with an emphasis on old grain flour, alternative flours and local folklore. In addition to this students will be introduced to special diet baking through lessons on gluten free bread and complements. A special focus is dedicated to Italy’s most famous baked product, pizza: through an in-depth analysis pizza will be explained and enjoyed in all its most popular variations.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPBI325
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course introduces students to the heritage of Italian traditional breads and provides a survey of the suitable flours and their characteristics as well as an introduction to the chemistry of baking and the most common starters. This course offers the opportunity to learn principles and techniques to prepare Italian breads, flat breads and rolls. Emphasis will be placed on the use of traditional fermentation methods, equipment and skills that emphasise flavour, texture and appearance as well as techniques that increase shelf-life. Fresh brewery yeast, biga, and poolish will be used according to the leavening processes of a variety of products. Students will learn the proper techniques for mixing, leavening, shaping and cooking Italian breads and other Italian baked and non-baked classics using dedicated flours and ingredients according to the regional heritage.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCBG305 / IDRHBG305
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course offers students a combination of two original approaches to Bernardo Buontalenti: discovering the artistic contribution of a genius in Florence’s 16th century intellectual scene, and learning the cultural, political and scientific background that led to the creation of modern ice cream (gelato). The lessons will range from Buontalenti’s childhood at the Medici court to his artistic training spanning the analysis of his Florentine works (ephemeral installations for spectacular events, theatrical sets, and costumes), masterpieces of sculpture, architecture, and monumental gardens. Buontalenti’s eclectic genius also involved the creation of the first ice cream machine. Students will learn about the various production techniques and genesis of sorbet, granita, and gelato from both a historical and technical point of view. Coursework will be organized through a series of practical workshops on various types of frozen desserts, lectures focusing on the artistic works of Buontalenti, and guided visits of major works by Buontalenti in Florence. Visits will include specialized tastings at select artisanal laboratories in Florence. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPCA450
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent.

This course will give students knowledge of the fundamentals of chocolate starting from an understanding of the ingredient, its history and evolution throughout centuries.
The course will cover the chocolate production process from harvest to the finished product, and will focus on the composition of chocolate in all its different types: dark, milk and white. Students will understand the differences between different cocoa percentage in chocolate and their suitable applications in pastry. Emphasis will be placed on basic chocolate tempering techniques, on chocolate bar production, and on the application of special molds for simple pralines and small centerpiece production. The course will also focus on the use of chocolate to create different ganaches, including matching them with the suitable type of pralines or desserts. Students will learn to use traditional and contemporary production methods when creating confections both by hand and with special equipment.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTFMRO350 / HPHTRO350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course will prepare students to work, run, and manage a retail shop successfully and provides theoretical insights into customer expectations and service delivery. Throughout the course, standard elements of a retail shop will be analyzed and focus on retail management will be given. This class will strengthen decision-making skills regarding expense planning, suppliers, store layout, and promotional strategies. Under the supervision of seasoned professionals, students will spend a portion of the course operating the school retail spaces (fashion retail store, restaurant, pastry shop) that are open to the local community. Here, theoretical knowledge, shop floor management skills, and ability to perform head office functions will all be developed in the context of retail. In order to offer a comprehensive view of retail management, experiential learning activities are scheduled in varying types of retailers, each of them characterized by different competitors, products sold, customers, and style of service required. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LACRCM390 / LAHSCM390
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course presents the specific structural and phenomenological aspects of the various types of mafia operating in Italy and internationally. Topics analyze contemporary criminal, social, cultural, and political features of mafia-related groups and explore traditional and emerging illegal markets. The course describes main Italian and international law policies and legislations to contrast this type of organized crime and the experiences of leading individuals and groups developing a culture of legality to combat the mafia.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPCC360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent.

This course provides students with fundamental working knowledge of the traditional methods of production for cookies and basic petit fours. The course will explore the preparation and design of cookies and mignardises ranging from Italian traditional cookies and biscuits to international specialties. Topics covered include mixing and make-up methods as well as shaping, baking, filling, finishing and storing. The course will also provide an introduction to petit fours production, with a focus on the description and service of petit fours and basic production techniques. Upon completion of the course students will be confident in choosing the most appropriate cookie for each occasion.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCAVC504
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Pre-requisite: Two semesters of Culinary Arts course work or equivalent.

The last 40 years of food service have been characterized by a slow yet constant development of nutritional awareness and a more informed approach to food. The aim of the course is not only to offer students techniques for a healthier approach to cooking: this course will focus on cooking techniques that can be applied in order to reduce fat consumption and at same time become the emblems of contemporary cuisine. Flavor-extraction methods, flavoring methods, pressure cooking and sous vide cooking, marinades and brines and the use of alternative fats are nowadays the base of contemporary Chefs’ creations: students will learn how these techniques can be used to develop a fine dining cuisine that can be healthier yet not necessarily health-fanatic. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUAFCF300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course provides an introduction to the theory, methods, and challenges of corporate finance. The main focus is on financing decisions and investment. The following topics are addressed: risk and return, asset markets and market efficiency, valuation, capital structure, capital budgeting, dividend policy, and derivative securities. Some consideration will also be given to financial management issues that multinational firms face, with an emphasis on the effects of currency denomination on financial decisions.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPDS480
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent.

The aim of the course is to give students the fundamentals of dessert presentation. Starting from fruit cutting skills, students will experience a variety of decoration techniques to be applied to mignons, single portion and tortes. Glazes and gelees, buttercream, whipped cream, icings, chocolate and caramel decorations will be explained and then practiced to gain confidence with the related techniques. Students will experience both classic and contemporary decoration methods, ranging from piping skills to the application of dedicated equipment for royal-icing writing. By the end of the course students will be able to execute the most common decorating and styling techniques and develop their own personal decoration style.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUEREM305 / BUMKEM305
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

The primary purpose of this course is to provide marketers with an in-depth understanding of product development practices including innovation, product strategy and processes, customer needs, identification, idea generation, concept development and optimization, forecasting, and launch. The course will analyze the marketing development strategies of new entrepreneurial companies with low budgets and little or no brand development. An important component of the coursework features hands-on approaches to real-life business problems that require application of topics learned in the classroom. Students will be introduced to highly creative and effective experiential forms of learning ranging from case studies to business plans, entrepreneurs in the classroom, conducting entrepreneurial audits, working with concepts of marketing inventions, and consulting projects. Furthermore, students will be part of a dedicated lab team of cross-disciplinary learners led by faculty and advisers, and will collaborate with executives and representatives from real companies on comprehensive business issues. Coursework includes site visits to local companies and special guest lectures from local prominent entrepreneurs.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTFMFB330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course addresses the new professional shopper profile by examining both the customer-oriented features of the industry as well as the general business principles of the fashion industry. Topics analyse the profession of the personal shopper, understanding the nature of services provided, as well as the strategies advised to clients from wardrobe analysis and purchasing. During the course, students will discuss fashion both in relationship to fashion history and international trends as well as communication and protocol for special occasions such as events. The final part of the class will include career guidance and marketing and promotion principles to build a customer base.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTFCSF360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course addresses the procedures involved in managing a fashion retail enterprise and the decision-making inherent in successful merchandising for smaller-scale stores. Knowledge will be acquired through lab practice gained by running a real enterprise in which students and professionals exchange their knowledge and propose successful solutions to be applied. Coursework includes site visits to well-known Italian luxury brands in Florence such as Ferragamo, Gucci, and Cavalli (companies may change according to availability), and special guest lectures from local prominent emerging designers.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPFBOM400
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course introduces a fundamental area of study in the hospitality industry. Students will study the concepts and procedures of food and beverage control systems, cost control, operating budgets, and the effective management of food and beverage operations and cycles. Cost calculation, menu planning, storage, receiving, profit and budget forecasting, labour costs, service payment systems, and other topic-specific areas will be covered. This course features Experiential Learning hours (Mon-Fri) at Ganzo FOH and Beverage Operations.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWWCWC340 / LSSOWC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyze the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course includes an Italian language component for beginning-level students and field learning activities. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centered process.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWWCWC345
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyse the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course.

This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centred process.

This course includes an Italian language component for beginning language students + 90 field learning hours.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPFBSM330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

The front of house area of any restaurant should be carefully planned in order to balance ambiance with function. Restaurant seating, wait stations, and waiting areas are just a few of the areas to consider when planning a restaurant dining room. The course focuses on all aspects that characterize the front of the house experience. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the front of the house to properly reflect the restaurant concept and the necessity of planning front of the house spaces for efficiency. Furthermore, the course considers the pivotal role of excellent customer service and the training methods of front of the house staff.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUMAHR350 / HPHTHR350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis on human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and other current issues. The course has been developed for individuals whose job requires managing employees in a global environment according to HR standards and practices. Topics covered include human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, personnel selection, performance, employee turnover, the importance of HR in an industry like the hospitality sector, ethics and practices within personnel, legal issues, and how diversity impacts the workforce. Please note that this course is open to students of Junior standing (third years).

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUREIH320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

The aim of this course is to provide students with knowledge on the role of urban policy and planning in relation to the housing market in a global context. Students will become familiar with the implications for policy and practice and will learn how to develop regional and local housing strategies. This course includes references to international cases from the United Kingdom, the United States, Ireland, Hong Kong, Australia, and other European countries. Student will gain knowledge of the impact that the emerging sharing economies have on urban development, as well as learning about the process of buying an Italian property as a secondary home.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUMAIM310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management or equivalent.

This course is designed for students interested in international business ventures and partnerships. Management, leadership, human resource management, organisational skills, and strategies will all be analysed from a cross-cultural business perspective. A major focus is on strategies adapting managerial skills across cultures. Guest lecturers and on-site visits to international business ventures are an integral part of the course.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPHTIN320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the development of international tourism from its historic beginnings to current growth. Emphasis will be placed on the topics of tourism marketing and structures, the role of governments in international tourism, the effect of tourism in a country’s infrastructure and society, and the impact of tourism in developing countries.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPHTIE200
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This introductory course provides students with the basic knowledge in the operation, coordination, and management of special events, and an overview of the major segments of the event industry. This course is designed for those who wish to explore the event industry for the first time with the purpose of developing their event management capabilities starting from a beginner level. Throughout course duration, students will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of real events held on campus in order to apply information acquired during class to a realistic context. During the course, students will gain first-hand experience by analytic observation through participation in a variety of events organised on campus. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUMKFM280 / FTFMFM280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course is an introduction to marketing and merchandising concepts in the fashion industry. Emphasis is placed on the apparel and accessory industry in Italy. Students learn terminologies specific to the field. Topics include the meaning of the “brand” in today’s consumer market, how to forecast trends, the product supply chain, the vertical business model and outsourcing, visual merchandising, advertising, different forms of in store and non-store retail, consumer behaviour and profiles, and store location and design. On-site visits to fashion retailers in Florence are an integral part of this course with suggested field trips to local designers as well as to fashion museums such as the Gucci Museum. Other topics include: Product development cycle of the fashion industry: the initial forecast, consumer analysis, marketing plans, sourcing and presenting the product. The importance of retail marketing and “experience shopping” – visual merchandising through analysis of store layout. The course will also cover market research and target customer identification, visual merchandising, direct marketing, internet and social media, and traditional advertising, and will focus on how to generate media attention through public relations (press relations, press kit releases, sponsorships, events, etc.).

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPHTIH300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course provides a fundamental overview of the hospitality industry and its main sectors: hotel, restaurant, management services, and clubs. In addition, students will learn the features of hospitality operations and trends, and examine the following topics: development of tourism, demand for travel, examination of food and beverages industry, associations and organisations related to hospitality as a sub-segment of the tourism industry. Students will gain a full understanding of the career opportunities that exist within the hospitality industry.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUMAIM250
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This introductory course provides an overview of management functions and managerial problem-solving strategies. Students will be instructed in the areas such as the qualities of successful managers, elements of strategic decision-making at various levels of an organisation, global business issues, goal-setting processes, and basic business controls. This course also teaches the fundamental principles of management built on human relations in order to manage and lead people effectively, resolve conflicts, and build productive teams.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUMKIM280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course is designed for non-business majors and introduces students to the role of marketing within a business. Through a combination of lectures, case studies, readings and simulations, students will address analytical marketing concepts and techniques developed from economics, psychology, statistics, and finance in order to plan and develop products and services to satisfy the needs of target customers. Topics include product planning, pricing, promotion, advertising, distribution policies, targeting, and market research techniques.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCAPC330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course is the first out of three about Professional Cooking and its aim is to introduce students to culinary fundamentals. The structure of the classical kitchen will be compared to the contemporary one in order to understand the differences in the organization of the brigade. The role of the Chef will be explained and discussed. Tools and equipment use, weights, measures and recipe conversion will be explained and practiced. This course will provide the first basic information about seasonings and flavorings and the application of herbs and spices in the kitchen. Students will approach cooking thanks to a careful analysis of knife skills, principles of cooking and basic cooking techniques, that include eggs, vegetables, pasta and meat cookery. Special emphasis will be placed on methods and procedures rather than on the complete preparation of finished dishes. A special focus will be put on kitchen cleaning, sanitation, maintenance and personal safety.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPSMSM300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course features a 15-hour faculty supervised project (Mon-Fri) at Sorgiva.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPBC310
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques I or equivalent.

Students will study the history and background of various national and regional desserts starting from a focus on the most important and typical Italian ingredients. Special attention will be paid to a detailed analysis of DOP and IGP products that are traditionally used in Italian pastry and their fundamental role for the identity of Italian cakes and tarts. The course will cover the origin of classical desserts and eventual variations from classical methods. Students will study a variety of doughs, batters, fillings and glazes with an emphasis on a thorough understanding of the techniques and proper skills for the execution of classic Italian desserts.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPIC440
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Prerequisites: Baking Techniques I or equivalent.

Since it was invented, sugar has played a fundamental role in the evolution of pastry as we know it today. Its intriguing and complex chemistry is by far one of the most significant challenges of pastry arts. This course revolves around this fundamental pastry art ingredient, sugar, and its applications in confectionery. Students will experience a full-immersion in the world of sugar, sugar preserves and small pastry decorations. Lessons will focus on the chemistry of sugars, on the suitable sugars for different types of preparations, and on traditional and contemporary confectionery art. Upon the successful completion of this course, students will be able to produce marmalade and jams, chutneys and Italian mostarda, candied fruits and fruits preserved in syrup. Emphasis will be placed on candies and caramelized fruit production, sugared nuts (pralines) and a wide variety of torrone (nougat).

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCANC505
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Prerequisites: Three semesters of culinary arts or dietetics/nutrition coursework and Cooking Light: Contemporary Techniques for Health Living, or equivalent.

Starting from the previously acquired knowledge of macro and micro nutrients, this course will provide students with the tools to analyze and develop a wide variety of nutritionally balanced meals on a seasonal basis. Students will learn the fundamentals of metabolism and digestion and apply previously acquired cooking methods in order to preserve nutrients, and the possible applications of a wide variety of ingredients to create satisfying dishes while still respecting nutritional concepts. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of special dietary requirements either depending on dietary special needs or ethical choices. Raw foodism, vegetarian and vegan diet as well as the possible alternatives to guarantee a balanced nutrient intake will be thoroughly covered. The course will give students the tools to design meals on a seasonal basis following the principles of healthy cooking. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWWCPF335
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course presents an exploration of food and wine pairing. The topic goes beyond a classic approach to pairing by demystifying the terminology and the methodology of matching wine and food. Whether preparing a meal at home or ordering at a restaurant, students gain an enhanced knowledge of pairing that can create a harmony and synergy between wine and food, which ultimately leads to a sublime connection of the mind, mouth, memories, and experiences. Particular focus will be given to the Italian cultural approach through wine tastings from the major wine areas paired with classic Italian recipes.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCAPC506
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Pre-requisite: Culinary Arts Majors only. The Science of Cooking: An Introduction to Molecular Cuisine, or equivalent.

The course is divided into three phases and explores stimulating applications of contemporary cuisine. Precision cooking and texture development apply the latest scientific discoveries to food production and may require special instruments for the achievement of specific results. This course focuses on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow chefs to development their creativity in order to reach new and sometimes unexpected results.

  • Phase 1, Temperature Application: This phase explores the possible applications in which precise and specific temperatures play a fundamental role. The microbiology as well as the sanitation practices for precision and low temperature cooking will be covered, with a complete overview of contemporary methods, equipment, and procedures used in contemporary kitchens and in food production labs. Special emphasis will be placed on sous-vide cooking through the use of the immersion circulator, applications of liquid nitrogen for different purposes other than freezing, stimulating effects of carbonation on food flavor perception, and the application of frozen food processing with the Pacojet food processor.
  • Phase 2, Gels and Thickening Agents: This phase examines how contemporary chefs and food technologists use ingredients in ways that earlier generations would have never imagined. Topics will analyze the increasing use of ingredients such as thickening and gelling agents in order to create sauces with unexpectedly smooth textures, hot and cold gels, firm coating gels, and methylcellulose gels. With the support of a chemist, specific additives will be evaluated, discussed, and tested.
  • Phase 3, Gases and Air-Based Preparations: This phase focuses on contemporary techniques of texture changes obtained by incorporating specific gases into foods in order to modify familiar textures, improve presentation methods, and serve unusual and contemporary dishes. Items such as foams, froth, and puffed snacks will be analyzed. Students will examine and test diverse types of foams, both hot and cold with different foaming agents from animal and vegetable sources, as well as learn how to produce light foams, thick fine-textured foams, textured snacks, airs, and froths.

This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWBPPP506
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Pre-requisite: Baking Techniques II: Italian Pastry Techniques or equivalent.

This course explores stimulating applications of both classic and contemporary pastry techniques to pastry shop and a la carte restaurant production. The program focuses on three main topics: the use of freezing temperatures through a survey of the possible applications in which cold temperatures and the balance of ingredients play a fundamental role; handling fresh and seasonal fruits in pastry production; the increasing use of ingredients such as thickening and gelling agents in order to create products with unexpectedly smooth textures, a wide variety of gels and contemporary mousses, and pastry applications of molecular gastronomy. Through this experience students will have the possibility to understand the role of specific ingredients in the production of ices in order to serve frozen desserts with a perfect balance between texture and temperature. The course will disclose all the secrets of pastry arts classics like semifreddo, bomba gelato, parfait and bon bons. Special emphasis will be placed on the uses of liquid nitrogen for different purposes other than freezing, stimulating effects of carbonation on food flavor perception, and the application of frozen food processing with the Pacojet food processor. The course offers a full-immersion in the pastry lab production with an important focus on techniques that can be available in a professional environment and allow pastry chefs to develop their creativity in order to reach new unexpected results.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BURERE280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The aim of this course is to provide student with an overview of the main characteristics of the real estate industry. Students will learn about the real estate business and will compare the Anglo-American and Italian systems. This course includes an introduction to real estate contract law and to Civil Law and Common Law in order to understand the different approaches of the legislation that regulates the real estate world. Students will also gain knowledge of the basics of real estate market economics including USA’s foreign direct investment (FDI) flows to Italy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUREPM330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

The aim of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge of professional property management. Students will become familiar with the different management methods, such as ownership and subleases, as well as the new specific insurance practices for the tourist rental market. This course focuses on major functions of property managers, and details specific practices and problems in managing a variety of properties, such as residential, retail and industrial ones. Students will also learn how to manage maintenance, construction, insurance, and relations with tenants.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LACRRM350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the relationship between gender inequality and the legal system. Topics include abortion, marriage, divorce, custody, equal pay, sexual harassment, rape, pornography, and prostitution. Students are introduced to basic legal research tools, such as statutes, regulations, cases, and legal literature. Bride kidnapping, also known as marriage by abduction or marriage by capture, is a practice known throughout history and around the world through which a man abducts the woman he wishes to marry.

Specific case studies will be covered such as the “fuitina” in Italy, which was a widespread practice in Sicily and the south. In theory and in some cases, it was an agreed elopement between two youngsters, in practice it was often a forcible kidnapping and rape followed by a so-called “rehabilitating marriage” (matrimonio riparatore). In 1965, this custom was brought to national attention by the case of 17-year-old Franca Viola, abducted and raped by a local small-time criminal, with the assistance of a dozen of his friends. When she was returned to her family after a week, she refused to marry her abductor, contrary to local expectations. Her family courageously supported her decision, and suffered severe intimidation for their efforts. Ultimately, the kidnappers were arrested and the main perpetrator was sentenced to 11 years in prison. The exposure of this archaic and intransigent system of values and behavioural mores caused great national debate. A 1970 film, “La moglie più bella” (The Most Beautiful Wife) by Damiano Damiani and starring Ornella Muti, is based on the case. Article 544 of the Italian Penal Code was amended only in 1981, when by law, rape could not be cancelled by marriage.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPFBRM390
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

This course examines the problems of the financial structures of restaurant management, in parallel with the objectives and techniques of the individual owner. The planning and decision-making tools available to managers in an organisation and comparison between single or partnership managements will be discussed. Personnel organisation and food preparation plans will be covered. The course is based on a double approach, combining theory and practice: students will be introduced to the basics of restaurant management and will be given the opportunity to discuss their ideas and questions with selected professionals who are successfully running their restaurant businesses in Florence. Extensive site visits to local restaurants be organised. This course features Experiential Learning hours (Mon-Fri) at Ganzo FOH. Some shifts may take place in the evening.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPHTRO250
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of retailing management. Students will learn about the different types of retailers, characteristics of retail channels, customers, and competitors in order to develop effective retail strategies. This course focuses on strategic decisions made by retailers including retail market strategy, location and site strategy selection for retail outlets, and store layout design and strategies. Students will learn about merchandising management principles, including how to manage merchandise inventory, organize merchandise, and evaluate performance. This course includes principles of retail pricing and how retailers set and adjust prices for the merchandise and services they offer. Students will also gain knowledge on how retailers build their brand image and communicate with customers. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HPHTSE410
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Event Management or equivalent.

This course examines all aspects of special event management and provides a comprehensive study of the special events industry focused on emphasising the dynamics of the creative process critical to these events. Special events include but are not limited to business events, weddings, ceremonies, celebrations, life cycle events, fairs, and festivals. Through the event planning process, special events will be examined from a logistical and financial perspective. The course will also provide students with the necessary background for improving effectiveness and profitability when managing special events, which demands competence in the areas of drafting contracts for events, marketing and sales, event logistics and preparations, staffing, and accounting. Special attention is given to the use of new digital tools for the organisation of events as well as the significant forms of social media in order to more effectively promote events. Coursework is tailored for students who already have studied the basics of event management. This class includes Experiential Learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUMAEF280 / SHSSEF280
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course provides the opportunity to understand and appreciate the facility operations and event management in the sport industry. Course topics will focus on various aspects of business, legal, and operational practices in the sports field. The class will feature lecture hours as well as real-life practice through the development of both facility management and sports events projects. Students will be engaged within the community and will be able to learn-by-doing, applying business theories and frameworks to the projects development. Coursework will enhance the student’s perspective and awareness of business issues from both a technical and a cultural point of view.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUEREV320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course is a unique exploration of startup ventures and entrepreneurship from an Italian perspective. Topics introduce the factors involved in initiating new entrepreneurial ventures that have the enduring power to become a successful company. Essential building blocks to be examined are market analysis and strategy, innovation and management, product development, operations, financial frameworks, and competitor analysis. Case studies are drawn from the Italian economy with a local focus on Florentine and Tuscan companies from the perspective of Innovation, Tradition, and Evolution, in order to understand how enterprises in Italy are generating new ventures.

The teaching method is a combined approach of lectures, visits, and laboratory activities enhanced by the active participation of involved companies. Coursework and projects will be supported by the EntrepreLearn Lab of FUA’s International School of Business, which also features workshops, activities, and networking events. The overall aim of advancing entrepreneurial knowledge through an academically grounded approach and interaction with the local economy is to prepare students for transforming ideas and projects into concrete and viable startup projects from an international perspective.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: BUMKMM315
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

The course discusses and analyses major marketing themes and concepts. Students will examine the influences a marketing plan has on Product definition (market of reference and segment analysis), Price, Place (distribution channels), and Promotion. Topics include an introduction to marketing, marketing planning, product concepts and product management, segmentation, targeting and positioning, consumer buying behaviour, promotional activities, channels of distribution, and pricing concepts. The course will also discuss a valid approach to the marketing process, from analysis to planning, implementation, and control of programs designed to generate the desired exchanges with target markets for the purpose of achieving organisational objectives.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWDNSC510
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Pre-requisite: Two semesters of Culinary Arts coursework or equivalent.

Forty years after the first appearance of Molecular Gastronomy, Chefs’ approach to food has dramatically changed. Gastronomists and food historians talk about the last great food revolution of our times; the movement that changed the way we perceive food and started to stimulate new questions and give interesting answers to those that want to enhance their food knowledge. Since then cooking has taken a great step forward, opening paths once impossible to even think about. This course is aimed at non-scientific students who wish to approach the world of scientific application toward cooking and want to improve their knowledge of cooking techniques. A scientist and a Chef will alternate teaching the course giving both technical information and practical suggestions. Students will learn cutting edge techniques to create new textures and amazing effects.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCATF440
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Pre-requisite: Tradition of Italian Food I or equivalent.

The survey of the most representative Italian preparations and ingredients continues as well as a deep analysis and application of Italian cuisine. Traditional preparations, characterizing ingredients and culinary movements will be fully covered during this course. The aim of this course is also to give students a complete overview of Italian cuisine evolution through the knowledge of XIX and XX century cultural influences such as futurism, nouvelle cuisine and present day innovations. This course is meant to help students understand the current Italian culinary trends as a continuous evolution of the different regional cooking traditions. The course will include an overview of the major Italian cuisine chefs styles and how they contributed to the mentioned evolution thanks to creativity and knowledge. Students will learn how to compose a menu in order to express a cooking philosophy and will also experience Italian fine dining standards through the practical application of learned concepts. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCATF340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Italian culinary tradition is the result of a long and complex historical, social and cultural process that can be fully understood through a careful analysis of the many aspects of Italian cultural heritage. In the past, food was characterised by the use of locally available ingredients and alimentary habits slowly became established and codified along with the specialisation and the improvement of regionally different production methods. Nevertheless, nutrition and cooking underwent substantial changes and profound transformations through the centuries, often resulting from historical and political events that affected the economy, the production, and the distribution of goods.

This course introduces students to Italian gastronomical traditions through the analysis of the main ingredients and the traditional preparations that have contributed to make Italian cuisine the most popular and imitated. Students will be introduced to the world of Italian quality ingredients thanks to a survey of DOP, IGP, and Slow Food Presidia quality certifications. The fundamental traditional cooking methods, techniques, and preparations utilised in Italian cuisine will be thoroughly covered and sampled in class. Course topics will be analysed through a focus on cultural background, origins, production processes, technical features and application in Italian cuisine. These experiences will prepare students continuing on to the advanced section of this course.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWWCTW262
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

The course will introduce students to the outstanding richness of the Tuscan wine tradition. Wine typologies representative of the region will be considered throughout the course, which focuses particularly on a detailed study of the most important wine production areas in Tuscany. A general introduction to wine appreciation will be featured along with the analysis of select Tuscan wines and their specific characteristics.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWWEWA340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course introduces students to Italy’s wine culture, tradition, and heritage as well as to the importance of wine within the Italian socio-economic framework and how to read an Italian wine label. The major grape varieties cultivated in Italy will be analysed and an emphasis will be placed on the main wine production techniques in order to understand the winemaking processes for red, white, rosé, Italian sparkling, sweet, and fortified wines. Students will learn the differences among types and styles of wine according to the winemaking choices, developing a critical capability of analysis and classification.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWWEWS335 / HPFBWS335
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course will examine the figure of the sommelier and provide essential information regarding wine service and beverage management. Topics include stocking a cellar, storing wine, reading and composing a wine list, selecting proper wine glasses, serving wine, decanting wine, and an introduction to other beverages. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWWEWW360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course has been designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the main wine producing countries of the Old World as France, Spain, Germany, Austria, Portugal, Hungary, Greece, Slovenia and of course Italy. Students will be guided across Europe to discover the principal wine areas and native grape varieties, with a specific focus on the cultural heritage and winemaking tradition that belong to each country. Course topics include the different appellation systems, soil characteristics, and basics of winemaking process. The course also offers an introduction to wine tasting in order to better understand the original features of the wines from each country.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: 4MARK005W
CREDITS: 20 UK credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This module is rich in theory from consumer studies, psychology and sociology explaining why consumers behave the way they do and how marketers can use this information. Both customer and organisational decision-making processes are explored.

COURSE: 4BUSS001W
CREDITS: 20 UK credits
OFFERED: Session 2

This module offers students the opportunity to learn about business organisations, their purposes, structures and governance in a global context. At the same time students will study the cultural differences within and between business organisations and the ethical constraints facing these organisations. As part of the process of learning about business organisations students will learn effective group and leadership skills and develop the skills necessary to structure a coherent report with conclusions linked to evidence.

COURSE: 4LLAW025X
CREDITS: 20 UK Credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This module provides an introduction to rights while at the same time trying to motivate students to later deepen their interest in human rights law. It starts with broad discussion on rights and continues with an exploration of the central institutions of the human rights regime while pointing to some of the main controversies in the human rights system. The module will address the tension between universalism and relativism, the difficulties with regard to the right holders (individuals, groups, collectivities, organisations) and point to current and future controversies and challenges in the areas of rights in general and human rights in particular.

COURSE: 4MARK001W
CREDITS: 20 UK credits
OFFERED: Session 1

This module provides students with an introduction to marketing and its role in business and society. It gives students an overview of the principles underpinning marketing activities, and is both an introduction to the subject area. The module aims to introduce the key concepts of marketing, an understanding of consumer behaviour, and an evaluation and application of marketing tools in the context of contemporary major social and environmental issues.

COURSE: 4HURM005W
CREDITS: 20 UK credits
OFFERED: Session 2

The course is designed as an introduction to the subject of Organisational Behaviour, which helps people in organisations to have a better understanding of factors that influence behaviour. It aims to improve self-understanding and also understanding of the behaviour of other people. The module draws on insights and research from Organisational Behaviour (specifically from the Psychological and Sociological parts of Organisational Behaviour) and more widely from the social sciences to explore a number of topics, enabling us to be more reliable and rigorous than using only “common sense” understandings of behaviour. The module highlights some areas of difference and diversity that we are likely to encounter in many contemporary organisations.

COURSE: 4MARK006W
CREDITS: 20 UK credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Creating and managing successful brands is a source of competitive advantage to modern organizations. This module provides students with the fundamental understanding of brands, brand positioning and brand portfolio management. It engages students by practical demonstration of the effective use of marketing and branding tools. At the heart of an effective brand strategy, is its seamless integration with the marketing mix. A successful brand plan does not only address how the brand will be communicated but also how it will be protected.

Students will visit the Museum of Brands (subject to change).

COURSE: 4CLST001X
CREDITS: 20 UK credits
OFFERED: Session 2

The course provides a student-centred understanding of the intercultural competencies needed in the professional world of the 21st century. It starts by supporting students in analysing their chosen career, identifying the challenges inherent in performing in a professional multicultural environment. It continues by developing, through interactive activities, skills such as recognising, acknowledging, mediating and reacting to a variety of cultural expectations and norms of behaviour. The course contains throughout a reflective strand, which encourages students to reflect on their internalised culture, unconscious bias and preferred social positioning, and how this might impact their work relations.

COURSE: MGMT 108
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Essentials of contracts, agency, partnerships, corporations, and other select areas of law in a business environment.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENVIRON 163
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of role of business in mitigating environmental degradation and incentives to be more environmentally responsive. Emphasis on corporate strategies that deliver value to shareholders while responding to environmental concerns.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: INTL DV 110
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Broad introduction to theoretical traditions in development studies, with focus on interactions between states, markets, and cultural value systems, with selected case studies in developing nations.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HIST 134C
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Changing European economy after World War I and II and in 1990s; impact of fourth and fifth Industrial Revolutions; Great Depressions of century during 1930s, 1970s, and 1980s; and changing modernization strategies; import-substituting industrialization in peripheries; Soviet modernization dictatorship in East Central Europe and its collapse; integration process of second half of century and rise of European Union; modernization model at end of century.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: EDUC 129
CREDITS: 5 Units

Seminar, four hours. Research seminar providing overview of high-profile legal controversies that shape so many policy debates at both K-12 and higher education levels. Major areas of focus include campus safety, religion and schools, educational quality and law, broad based right to equal educational opportunity, and Internet-related issues and concerns.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MGMT 126
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Management 120B.

Comprehensive study of concepts and procedures used to interpret and analyze balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. Calculation and interpretation of financial ratios and credit analysis. Valuation theory using both discounted cash flows and residual income model.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: GEOG M128 / URBN PL CM166
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Questions of population, resource use, Third World poverty, and environment. Analysis of global economic restructuring and its connections to changing organization of production and resulting environmental impacts. Case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and U.S.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: COMM 148
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of key concepts and methods in marketing communications in both traditional and digital media. Development and execution of communications strategies, with primary emphasis on consumer insight, branding, market segmentation and positioning, message strategy, promotion, and execution of marketing communications through appropriate media technologies.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MGMT 120A
CREDITS: 5 US credits

Pre-requisite: Management 1B.

Intermediate-level course in theory and practice of financial accounting. Underlying concepts of asset valuation and income measurement. Measurement and reporting of current and long-term assets, including cash and marketable securities, inventories, plant assets and depreciation, and intangibles.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ECON 106G
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisites: Course 101 / Co-requisite: Course 106GL

Enrollment priority to Business Economics majors. Introduction to basic ideas of game theory and strategic thinking. Discussion of ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, and signaling, with application to examples from economics, politics, business, and other real-life situations.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: UG LAW 183
CREDITS: 2 Units

Introduction to basic principles of criminal law. How to read and interpret judicial cases and provisions of penal code to learn how American criminal justice system works. Discussions structured to simulate experience of typical law school classroom.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: SOCIOL 169
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Specific topics may include law in preindustrial and industrialized societies, legalization of contemporary social relations, participants’ experiences of legal processes, lay perceptions of justice, social movements toward equal justice, roles of lawyers and judges, social impact of court decisions.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MGMT 182
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Proven methods for motivating, and inspiring best performance, persuading, and influencing others; leading high-performance teams; creativity and innovation; decision-making, and negotiating skills, both one-on-one and in groups. Organizational examples, simulations, and in-class exercises.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MGMT 122
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Course 1B, one statistics course.

Nature, objectives, and procedures of cost accounting and control; job costing and process costing; accounting for manufacturing overhead; cost budgeting; cost reports; joint-product costing; distribution cost; standard costs; differential cost analysis; profit-volume relationships and break-even analysis.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ECON 160
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Course 102

Principles of money and banking in U.S.; legal and institutional framework; money supply process; instruments, effects, and practice of monetary policy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FILM TV 84A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of evolving economic structures and business practices in contemporary Hollywood film industry, with emphasis on operations of studios and independent distribution companies, their development, marketing, and distribution systems, and their relationship to independent producers, talent, and agencies.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: PHILOS 166
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination, through study of recent philosophical writings, of such topics as nature of law, relationship of law and morals, legal reasoning, punishment, and obligation to obey law.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: INTL DV M120
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Contact CISaustralia for course description.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MGMT 1A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to financial accounting principles, including preparation and analysis of financial transactions and financial statements. Valuation and recording of asset-related transactions, including cash, receivables, marketable securities, inventories, and long-lived assets. Current liabilities.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ECON 1
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to principles of economic analysis, economic institutions, and issues of economic policy. Emphasis on allocation of resources and distribution of income through price system.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: SOCIOL 147A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Sociological theories of social origins, organization, and meanings of crime and criminal behaviors.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MGMT 180
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Topics of special interest to undergraduate students. Specific subjects may vary each term depending on particular interest of instructors or students. Focus on proven methods for succeeding in one-on-one interactions, small groups, and large audiences. Topics include accelerating trust and rapport, best question-asking strategies, executive communication skills, strengthening leadership presence, strengthening one’s relationships, network and reputation, and staying poised under pressure.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ECON 41
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B.

Introduction to probability and statistics for economists, with emphasis on rigorous arguments. Not open to students with credit for former Statistics 11.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MGMT 127A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Management 1B.

Study of fundamental income tax problems encountered by individuals and other entities in analyzing business, investment, employment, and personal decisions. Special emphasis on role of tax rules in capital transactions and decision making.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FOR2001
CREDITS: 7.5 ECTS credits / 36 contact hours

The aim of the course is to familiarise students with applications of psychology to the legal system and to raise awareness about the problems that arise when psychology is applied to law in practice.

In the course of 3 weeks, students will take part in an intensive educational program that covers the most important topics in the field of Forensic Psychology. During the course four main themes within the field of forensic psychology will be addressed.

  1. Eyewitness memory, which consists of eyewitness identification and (false) memories.
  2. Interviewing and interrogation. Within this topic,the students learn about police interrogation techniques, deception detection and (false) confessions.
  3. Cognitive biases in the legal context. Students will get acquainted with the interpretation and reliability of forensic evidence and the role of biases in experts’ decisions.
  4. Association of mental illness and crime. Within this topic students will examine the psychopathic mind and the psychology of sex offenders.

Different case studies, tools and experiments will be discussed in order to allow the students to get acquainted with the methods used in this discipline. In each tutorial, research articles and case material descriptions related to a theme will be studied and discussed. The examination will consist of question-based tests taken throughout the course, a final symposium where students will present and discuss topics related to Forensic Psychology and a final paper.

This intensive course includes:

  • Weekend excursion to Cologne and Düsseldorf – includes guided tour at NSDOK museum, group dinner, guided tour of Düsseldorf palace (to be confirmed)
  • Weekend excursion to The Hague and Amsterdam – visits to MICT, Anne Frank house, guided walking tour of Amsterdam, Zaanse Schans open air museum visit (to be confirmed)
COURSE: BUS2008
CREDITS: 7.5 ECTS credits / 36 contact hours

We live in exciting times where leaders need to prove what they are worth.

Governments and companies are confronted with issues such as increasing speed of innovation, cultural diversity, health issues, increase in refugees, rising energy costs and stricter regulations on CO2 emissions, etc. These issues are connected to a world of rapidly changing technological, political, economic, climate and environmental developments. Who do we trust to guide us through all these crises?

Leadership is about putting dots on the horizon, creating a shared vision, leading the change and working together with the followers towards new perspectives. Leadership is about understanding that crises are an opportunity for change.

This course deals with leadership and change in both a global and business context. It confronts students with current important issues with the aim to develop knowledge and to improve leadership skills to deal with these issues in a creative way. Understanding the system at hand is important, but also understanding how leadership has an impact on the system.

To make optimal use of a vision it must be converted into a strategic operation for companies (Collins & Porras, 1996). The blend between vision, strategy, leadership and co-workers means that entrepreneurs must act like leaders with a clear indication of the direction to mobilise the organisation in order to achieve goals and at the same time maintain employee motivation.

We will introduce examples of leadership that changed the rules of the game, such as Al Gore who tries to create awareness of the impact of climate change or Ellen MacArthur’s ambition to change the world towards a circular economy by building a framework for an economy that is restorative and regenerative by design. And Jamie Oliver, the British Chef who tried to change the food culture.

We think that leadership is not only about charisma or personal characteristics, but about personal dedication to a goal or vision far beyond personal interests. This type of leadership is embedded ‘in context’. This implies that leadership is not a personal characteristic but a part of a relationship among people in a community where qualities like trust, playfulness, and creativity are involved. Students are invited to share and discuss their personal leadership experiences and inspirations.

This intensive course includes:

  • Weekend excursion to Cologne and Düsseldorf – includes group dinner and guided tour of Düsseldorf palace (to be confirmed)
  • Weekend excursion to The Hague and Amsterdam – visits to Anne Frank house, guided walking tour of Amsterdam, Zaanse Schans open air museum (to be confirmed)
CREDITS: 7.5 ECTS credits / 48 hours

This course covers a variety of topics including: Entrepreneurship in Europe, Introduction to Social Business, Business Planning, Disruptive Methods, Entrepreneurial Failure and Success, Pan-European Business Development as Entry Strategy, Business Model Generation, Digital Strategy, Cross-Cultural Management, and Company / Corporate Visits.

CREDITS: 7.5 ECTS credits / 48 hours

This course covers a variety of topics including: Luxury Brand Concepts, Luxury Markets, Understanding the Consumer Worldwide, Retail Marketing, Brand Strategy, Disruptive Methods, Distribution in the Luxury Industry, Champagne & Wine Business, and Cross-Cultural Management.

COURSE: ISSU9CJ
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 2

This module is designed to introduce students to the subject of Criminology through the lens of the Scottish Criminal Justice System. The module begins with an overview of the Scottish Criminal Justice System before examining the major avenues by which the public obtain information about crime – as victims of crime and from the media and official statistics. The module examines the processes that have developed our definitions of crime and the broader social and political context in which this crime occurs. In addition to this, the course provides the opportunity for students to engage in discussion with a Scottish Prison Service Warden, allowing a deeper understanding of punishment in Scotland and the incarceration of offenders.

Excursion(s): This module includes a visit to the Surgeon’s Hall in Edinburgh to discuss the criminal case of Burke and Hare, and the inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous detective, Sherlock Holmes.

COURSE: ISSU9BS
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 1

Marketing and Branding Scotland aims to give students a basic understanding of the environment within which business in Scotland operates and how its culture is sold globally and how culture is used to sell goods and services. In addition, the module will provide an introduction to an understanding of what Marketing is, how it can be used, especially in the context of smaller businesses. Themes of place marketing, nation branding and the importance of cultural heritage in the marketing process will also be introduced.

Excursion(s): This module’s excursion includes a visit to a Scottish drinks manufacturer, food producer or Scotland’s national tourism agency.

COURSE: ISSU9SM
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 1

That Scotland can lay claim to being the home of modern day golf and football (soccer) makes it an ideal place to learn about the integration of culture, management and sport. The aim of this module is to teach you about how sport is managed in Scotland and in Europe and about how it is incorporated into the thread of Scottish culture. The module will include a mixture of lectures and seminars accompanied by academic field trips to Scottish sports clubs and organizations, providing students with an understanding that sport is influenced by cultural traditions, social values and economic factors.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 3

This course will cover an introduction to microeconomic and macroeconomic principals. In addition, the course will cover a basic overview of personal finance with a focus on savings and investment strategies. The principals of supply and demand curves will be studied. We will discuss the reasoning and rationale that drives people to make choices in the marketplace as well as the short-term and long-term financial implications of those decisions. We will review commonly used economic measures including GPD, PPP, and COGS. Tools and strategies for financial planning will be examined. Basic money management and investment techniques will be compared and analysed.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 2

This course has an introductory characteristic and with a special focus on Japanese management style. In this course you will learn: how historical, social and cultural patterns affect the management practices of Japanese organisations; how other factors, such as the legal, political/governmental, economic and technological system, socio-cultural factors enable Japanese companies to operate successfully in an international business context; how Japanese companies develop strategies for international operations; how to improve cross-cultural communication and negotiation skills in an East-meets-West setting.

CREDITS: 3 North American credits / 39 lecture hours & academic projects

Students’ capabilities in written communication, oral presentation and non-verbal communication are developed and enhanced within a business and management context. Report and technical writing, presentation preparation, public speaking, business etiquette, negotiation skills, time management and interpersonal communication skills are among the topics emphasised. The ISIBM integrates business communications with business education, and students will make presentations on the core business challenges that are discussed in Module 2.

CREDITS: 3 North American credits / 39 lecture hours & academic projects

This course is based on a program that has earned UVic several international awards. It aims to develop a fundamental understanding of the skills and tools necessary to succeed in today’s global marketplace. The course begins with issues relating to starting a business (entrepreneurship), continued with topics around ensuring success (service management) and ends with issues involving growing the business (international business). Whether you plan to start your own business one day or work in a large multinational corporation, this course provides you with knowledge to enhance your opportunities for success.

One Moment...

Adventure Awaits

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive the latest updates on all CISaustralia programs, scholarships, news and more!