Social Sciences Courses

Take Social Science courses overseas to enhance your career prospects! Choose from hundreds of courses in a wide range of subjects, including Anthropology, Cultural and International Studies, Gender Studies, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Social Work and more!
FILTER BY
Program Types:
  • January Study
  • July Study
  • Language Study
Countries:
  • Belize
  • Cambodia
  • Canada
  • China & Hong Kong
  • Costa Rica
  • Czech Republic
  • England
  • Fiji
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Malaysia
  • Morocco
  • Nepal
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Scotland
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • Uganda
  • USA
  • Vietnam
  • Zambia
Area of Study:
  • Social Sciences
    • Anthropology
    • Cultural Studies and International Studies
    • Gender Studies
    • Political Science, Government and Intelligence
    • Psychology
    • Sociology and Social Work

Need a recommendation? Contact us and we can assist you in finding the right program.

ENQUIRE NOW
Available Courses by Program
COURSE: History 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits

The Mediterranean Sea is home to some of the most ancient civilizations in the world. This multi-country program will allow students to immerse in the fascinating history and culture of three of the most beautiful and inspiring cities in Europe. We’ll travel from the ancient Imperial Rome to the Florence of the Renaissance with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, and finish with the modern and extravagant architecture of Gaudi in the vibrant city of Barcelona.

COURSE: International Studies 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits

The Mediterranean Sea is home to some of the most ancient civilizations in the world. This multi-country program will allow students to immerse in the fascinating history and culture of three of the most beautiful and inspiring cities in Europe. We’ll travel from the ancient Imperial Rome to the Florence of the Renaissance with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, and finish with the modern and extravagant architecture of Gaudi in the vibrant city of Barcelona.

COURSE: SPAN 350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July: Session 1 and 2

Why are Spaniards currently exhuming mass graves of the Civil War? How can the country tolerate an unemployment rate of 20 percent? Why has Catalan and Basque nationalism dominated politics for decades? Why does a country with a historic reputation for machismo boast such progressive laws on gender and gay marriages? Why does political corruption remain so prevalent? This course examines political and social issues relevant to Spaniards today. It begins by discussing recent history in order to contextualize the major themes of the past few decades. It then moves to those subjects that emerged out of the transition to democracy – regionalism, terrorism, and linguistic pluralism – and still account for many of the peculiarities of Spanish politics. The second half of the course analyzes “Spain’s Second Transition” under José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero by focusing on immigration, Islamic fundamentalism, foreign policy, gender and family relations, historical memory, political corruption, and the economic crisis. The course is multi-disciplinary, consisting of a mixture of readings from political science, history, and cultural studies. Each session will consist of a lecture and a class discussion.

COURSE: GSANCI202 / ISISCI202 / LAAHCI202 / LSSOCI202
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one’s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCFC340 / LSSOFC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, A, B

This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as “made in Italy” culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism, and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and/or tastings.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCFF347
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and cultural scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities; encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence’s thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings and visits. This is a Food and Culture course, not a CA/BP lab course. Food labs emphasise the food culture of Italy and are not based on professional cooking techniques.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: 201/301/303/375/501/503/575
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

Students explore major cities across Europe using literature and the arts as a guide to understanding the rise and establishment of the urban setting. Through readings and media studies, students examine the artistic process from inspiration to creation. Site visits and guided tours then allow students to experience the historical, geographical, and demographical foundations that inform the fictional representations of European cities and their impact on perceptions of those cities today. Students have the opportunity to learn from and exchange their observations with experts as well as distinguished on-site scholars and local guides in order to frame their own perception of the cities and these cities’ representation through the arts.

This course will explore the rise and the establishment of the urban setting as the nexus of contemporary European culture and civilisation. Literature and the arts will serve as the focal point. The course will concentrate primarily on the late nineteenth-century up to the contemporary setting, more specifically on Rome, Aix-en-Provence/Marseille, Paris, Amsterdam and Prague. Students will explore a variety of media: novel, poetry, cinema and the fine arts.

Courses offered include:

  • European Studies 303: Europe and the Urban Space
  • Anthropology 301: The Artist and the City
  • Literature 375: The European City in Literature
  • Communications 375: The European City in the Visual Arts
  • Geography 201: Europe and its Cities

The syllabus for this program remains the same regardless of which course the student undertakes. As students are visiting the same sites, attending the same lectures, partaking in the same activities, etc. they are learning the same content. The difference is in their assessment pieces. The topic and focus of a student’s assessment pieces will be based on what course they have chosen.

COURSE: 385/585
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

This course provides a university-level competency in the history, literature, art and archaeology of the Greco-Roman World, as well as aspects of the Medieval and Renaissance periods. It cultivates strong analytical and critical thinking skills, and develops students’ ability to synthetise cultural, historical, religious, political and material/visual evidence. The academic content of the seminar is conveyed through an extensive series of on-site lectures and discussions by academic experts in the fields of history, art history and archaeology.

Courses include:

  • Archaeology 385: Greek and Roman Archaeology
  • Art History 385: Ancient and Medieval Classical Art and Architecture
  • Cross Cultural Studies 385: Cultural Identities in Mediterranean Europe
  • History 385: Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean Cultural History
  • Religious Studies 385: From Polytheism to Monotheism, The Early Christian Period in Italy, Greece & France

The syllabus for this program remains the same regardless of which course the student undertakes. As students are visiting the same sites, attending the same lectures, partaking in the same activities, etc. they are learning the same content. The difference is in their assessment pieces. The topic and focus of a student’s assessment pieces will be based on what course they have chosen.

CREDITS: 20 UK credits / 40 hours face to face in class lecture + tutorial hours

Globalisation is a process crossing social boundaries. It also crosses disciplinary divisions. This module is therefore designed to be an introduction to thinking about the new world order where moral, economic, political and ecological issues are intertwined with a debate about the future of society. This is now a vogue topic in both academic and public spheres and a crucially important subject in current sociological debates.

This course is a second year module (Level 5 of British system).

COURSE: 395/595
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

This course is designed for students interested in an academically rigorous and cultural experience in Morocco, Gibraltar, Spain and France. The academic component consists of a series of briefings from leading European academic, literary and political personalities and experts on the European relationship with the Islamic world. Participants will attend daily lectures and meetings with distinguished scholars in addition to local guides and experts in the field of politics, art history, history and culture. Special emphasis will be placed on the importance of North African immigration to Europe and its current socio-cultural implications.

Courses offered include:

  • Art History 395: Classical Islam and the European Renaissance
  • Cross Cultural Studies 395: Jews, Muslims and Christians in Europe and the Islamic World
  • French 395: Cultural History of France and the Islamic World
  • History 395: Cultural History of Europe and the Islamic World
  • Political Science 395: European Politics and the Islamic World
  • Religious Studies 395: Jews, Muslims and Christians in Europe and the Islamic World
  • Spanish 395: Cultural History of Spain and the Islamic World

The syllabus for this program remains the same regardless of which course the student undertakes. As students are visiting the same sites, attending the same lectures, partaking in the same activities, etc. they are learning the same content. The difference is in their assessment pieces. The topic and focus of a student’s assessment pieces will be based on what course they have chosen.

COURSE: ICSS 306 M01
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

This seminar course considers the ways in which New York has been rebuilt and redefined by people and institutions since the late nineteenth century. Topics include: Wall Street and trusts; Gilded Age politics; water, parks, and mass transportation; apartment houses, tenements, and housing reform; class warfare and the labour movement; fine arts and popular amusements; national mass culture and the 1920s boom; Depression and Fiorello La Guardia; Robert Moses and urban renewal; suburbanisation; the urban crisis; the new immigrants; globalisation and postindustrial reform.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1

This course is a survey of Japanese popular culture with particular topics covered such as anime manga, fashion, music, art and food. Part of the course will focus on Japanese animation within a historic and popular cultural perspective. Both anime and manga will be examined with particular emphasis on the art, culture and national and international popularity.

COURSE: ICCU 201
CREDITS: 4 Thai credits

Introduction to Southeast Asia (SEA) and its extraordinary diversity through the humanities, the arts and social sciences. Emphasis on the intellectual and practical challenges linked to modernisation and development. Study of the ways SEA-member states cope with the social, cultural, economic, political and religious issues brought about by globalisation.

COURSE: ICML 160
CREDITS: 4 Thai credits

Provides vocabulary and structures for everyday use and introduces basic aspects of Thai culture. After successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Handle basic communicative situations such as asking for and giving directions, ordering food and risks, asking for prices and bargaining, and buying tickets
  2. Understand the importance of rice farming and ceremonies involving growing rice and Buddhism in daily life
COURSE: SPAN 350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July: Session 1 and 2

Why are Spaniards currently exhuming mass graves of the Civil War? How can the country tolerate an unemployment rate of 20 percent? Why has Catalan and Basque nationalism dominated politics for decades? Why does a country with a historic reputation for machismo boast such progressive laws on gender and gay marriages? Why does political corruption remain so prevalent? This course examines political and social issues relevant to Spaniards today. It begins by discussing recent history in order to contextualize the major themes of the past few decades. It then moves to those subjects that emerged out of the transition to democracy – regionalism, terrorism, and linguistic pluralism – and still account for many of the peculiarities of Spanish politics. The second half of the course analyzes “Spain’s Second Transition” under José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero by focusing on immigration, Islamic fundamentalism, foreign policy, gender and family relations, historical memory, political corruption, and the economic crisis. The course is multi-disciplinary, consisting of a mixture of readings from political science, history, and cultural studies. Each session will consist of a lecture and a class discussion.

CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course will examine various aspects of the relationship between food, culture and society in the Mediterranean basin, where eating is not a simple act of survival but rather a cultural and social activity. Looking at the local culture through the lens of food allows us to discover and understand social constructs, values and even the history of Europe, from ancient Greece to the great chefs of the 21st century such as Ferran Adrià. Through this we will discover the similarities and differences between how the Spanish, Italian and Greece societies work.

In this course we offer a cross-cultural perspective that will focus on history, anthropology, sociology, literature, gastronomy and the business that works behind the food industry.

COURSE: IS 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course will examine various aspects of the relationship between sport and society in Spain, with a particular emphasis on sports with a long tradition in Catalonia. We will examine both the impact of sport on Spanish society and the influence of society on the practice of sport in Spain. The course begins with a consideration of general theoretical questions in the study of sport before moving on to an account of the historical development of sports in Spain in general and in Catalonia in particular. We also examine the reciprocal influences of sport violence, gender, race and ethnic and national identities in Spain.

CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1

This course examines the main political and socio-economic processes that help understand present-day Barcelona, particularly after the 1992 Olympics turned it into a vibrant global city. Through the lens of politics, human geography and history, students will explore topics like massive tourism, gentrification, environmental sustainability, the real state bubble, or immigration dynamics. Special attention will be paid to the tense power relations between Catalonia and Spain, the political heritage of Franco’s fascist dictatorship and the rise of the Catalan independence movement.

COURSE: MET SO 501
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Sociology. A socio-cultural history of Boston’s North End that examines changes in the area from the first Puritan settlement to the current period of gentrification, with central attention given to the dynamics of culture change among the Italian immigrants. Covers the impact of global changes on local processes, changes in American notions of identity and inclusion, and ethnic succession and competition; religious change, social organization, and Catholic festivals; William Foote Whyte’s “Street Corner Society”; myths and realities of “the Mafia” and impact of urban decline and drug violence in the North End in the 70s and 80s; tourism, food marketing, and gentrification. Course includes two visits to the North End, including dinner in a North End restaurant on the final night of the course.

There is an additional USD $100 fee for this course.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS IR 501 / CAS PO 554
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: junior standing or consent of instructor.

Investigates patterns of conflict and cooperation in South and East Asia surrounding issues ranging from water resources and health to borders and war. Analyzes how such issues contribute to instability in the region, as well as methods of cooperation.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS HI 287
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Analysis of the history of American foreign policy from the perspective of the changing world and regional international systems; emphasis on the effect of these systems and the impact of America on the creation and operation of international systems.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry II.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS IR 350
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

What are the causes and consequences of the global Cold War? How was the twentieth-century international system transformed by East-West conflict, North-South disparity and South-South cooperation and competition? What lessons can be drawn from this recent past? These are some of the questions examined by this course. The course contextualizes present-day international and regional conflicts and cooperation in the recent past, collectively analyzes primary source documents, and discusses policy implications.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS IR 349
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

What were the causes and the consequences of the two World Wars? What was the nature of political, economic, and military relations among the major powers of the world from the beginning of the twentieth century to the end of the Second World War? What was the effect of domestic factors (political, economic, religious, and ideological) on the foreign policies of individual states? Seeking to provide a genuinely multinational perspective on world affairs, this course assesses the ways in which powerful nation-states in this period competed and cooperated in the international system.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS PO 171 / CAS IR 271
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Explores major issues in international relations, including conflict, cooperation, and governance. Addresses dominant international relations theories and their application. Investigates state system, international law and organization, transnational actors, state behavior, and globalization.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LJ 283
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

In English translation. Japanese film from the silent era to contemporary animation, with attention to the intersection of cinematic and cultural analysis and genres such as yakuza movies. Directors studied may include Ozu, Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and Miyazaki Hayao.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS PO 328 / CAS IR 395
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Employs a multidisciplinary approach to analyze the relations between the industrialized nations of the “North” and the developing nations of the “South.” Addresses historical and current issues in North-South relations, including trade, investment, migration, regional economic integration, and the environment.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS IR 527 / CAS PO 548
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: junior standing or consent of instructor.

How did China implement economic reform? What were the progresses and limitations? How is China’s political-economic development influencing the global system? Discussions are conducted in a comparative perspective. Countries of reference include Japan and India.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS LC 287
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Major Chinese films interpreted in light of modern Chinese history and culture. Focuses on questions of national and cultural identity in films from the 1980s to the present day by directors from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. In English.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS IR 511
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

A critical survey of the rise and development of modern nations, states, and economies in the Middle East and North Africa since 1900 that provides context and perspective essential for understanding contemporary issues (e.g., peace process, gender relations, religion’s roles, democracy).

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CAS IR 300 / CAS PO 380
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Topics in International Relations. This course studies the evolution and current status of the women’s movement throughout select African countries on issues such as politics and media culture. Its goal is to provide a broad understanding of women’s lives in the region, both in relation to and separate from globalization.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CPCRCM360 / HPHTCM360
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Italian destination cities immediately conjure up images of the art, food, fashion, wine, and culture in which their fame lies: fashion shows and La Scala in Milan, Renaissance art in Florence, Brunello wine in Montalcino, the Biennale and Carnevale in Venice. This course will explore how creative advertising strategies have been produced and implemented, their effect on city identity, the proliferation of creative areas in destination cities, and the future of creativity and creative marketing. Case studies of both well-established metropolises and developing destinations will be examined.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: GSANCI202 / ISISCI202 / LAAHCI202 / LSSOCI202
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

The study of Italian culture helps the student to acquire a deep awareness of both cultural unity and regional diversity. This course is intended to provide students with an in-depth introduction to Italian culture and to broaden one’s awareness and understanding of the role of cultural heritage in customs and lifestyles. Lectures will provide students with an organized, focused, and academic understanding of Italian history, art, architecture, food, religion, and culture. The course provides additional enrichment through basic notions of Italian language and terminology along with assigned readings and a final paper. On-site teaching is a significant part of this course and is aimed to provide the student with an incomparable experience of studying important sites of artistic architectural and social relevance in present-day Italy. Students are encouraged to observe the sites through active participation and to discuss their observations using specific and analytic social assessment skills.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFSIF320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the development and structure of the Italian family through history with the following topics: Sexuality and the development of relationships, study of individuals, groups, and families, diversity in modern families, community regulations/policies addressing issues of family change, crisis, and maintenance. Students will conduct evaluation of different styles and examples of interpersonal communication behaviours. The course will also compare and contrast family/individual behaviour patterns associated with human life cycle transitions and examine various social issues associated with the study of Italian families.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FTFCFM300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the context in which the Italian fashion system was born. Topics begin from the evolution of fashion from the post-WWII period to the present and address the role and influence of media and culture on factors such as economic and social status, the arts, and other issues that influenced fashion. Students explore fashion’s connection to identity, body, politics, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and how fashion and media are interrelated with these aspects of culture.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCFC340 / LSSOFC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, A, B

This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as “made in Italy” culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism, and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and/or tastings.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCACC350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as “social creatures”. Italy represents a unique case for how food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society.

This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Food labs twice a week, one aperitivo project shift per session.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWWCWC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyse the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course. This course also features a field learning component in relevant Italian locations to supplement and enrich academic topics.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWWCWC345
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 90 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

This course is targeted towards students who are interested in the Italian traditions and the pivotal role that Italy has played in the evolution of food and wine culture. Italy is in fact the oldest wine-producing nation in the world where grapes are grown in almost every region of the country. This course will consider and analyse the various influences and cultural overlaps that this ancient tradition has brought to contemporary Italian culture. The course will also feature an Italian language component in order to better understand and appreciate the elements of contemporary Italian culture which will be discussed during the course.

This class includes field learning hours. Field learning is a method of educating through first-hand experience. Skills, knowledge, and experience are acquired outside of the traditional academic classroom setting and may include field activities, field research, and service learning projects. The field learning experience is cultural because it is intended to be wide-reaching, field-related content is not limited to the course subject but seeks to supplement and enrich academic topics. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice while experiencing Italian culture, art, and community within the Italian territory. Faculty will lead students in experiencing Italian culture through guided projects and field experiences as planned for the course. Field learning will be developed through classroom preparation, follow up projects, and guided learning outcomes. Field learning will provide students with the opportunity to develop skills and appreciate the multifold components of Italian Culture through direct experience. Field education will advance student learning as a relationship-centred process.

This course includes an Italian language component for beginning language students + 90 field learning hours.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCFF347
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: All

The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and cultural scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities; encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence’s thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings and visits. This is a Food and Culture course, not a CA/BP lab course. Food labs emphasise the food culture of Italy and are not based on professional cooking techniques.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCATF340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

Italian culinary tradition is the result of a long and complex historical, social and cultural process that can be fully understood through a careful analysis of the many aspects of Italian cultural heritage. In the past, food was characterised by the use of locally available ingredients and alimentary habits slowly became established and codified along with the specialisation and the improvement of regionally different production methods. Nevertheless, nutrition and cooking underwent substantial changes and profound transformations through the centuries, often resulting from historical and political events that affected the economy, the production, and the distribution of goods.

This course introduces students to Italian gastronomical traditions through the analysis of the main ingredients and the traditional preparations that have contributed to make Italian cuisine the most popular and imitated. Students will be introduced to the world of Italian quality ingredients thanks to a survey of DOP, IGP, and Slow Food Presidia quality certifications. The fundamental traditional cooking methods, techniques, and preparations utilised in Italian cuisine will be thoroughly covered and sampled in class. Course topics will be analysed through a focus on cultural background, origins, production processes, technical features and application in Italian cuisine. These experiences will prepare students continuing on to the advanced section of this course.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: M107
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to development of rap music and hip-hop culture, with emphasis on musical and verbal qualities, philosophical and political ideologies, gender representation, and influences on cinema and popular culture. P/NP or letter grading.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: SOCIOL 134
CREDITS: 5 Units

Theories of relation of variations in personality to culture and group life, in primitive and modern societies, and influence of social role on behavior.

Designed for juniors/seniors.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: INTL DV 110
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Broad introduction to theoretical traditions in development studies, with focus on interactions between states, markets, and cultural value systems, with selected case studies in developing nations.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ASIA AM 10
CREDITS: 5 Units

Multidisciplinary examination of history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in U.S.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CHICANO 10A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Interdisciplinary survey of diverse historical experiences, cultural factors, and ethnic/racial paradigms, including indigenousness, gender, sexuality, language, and borders, that help shape Chicana/Chicano identities. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: INTL DV 1
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of historical and contemporary context of socioeconomic inequalities between Global South and Global North. Focus on cultural, political, and economic realities of developing world, which includes countries of Asia, eastern Europe, Africa, Middle East, and Latin America.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: I A STD 1
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to international and area studies from interdisciplinary framework, covering themes related to international politics and markets, as well as international societies and cultures, to illuminate and clarify profoundly international character of world we live in and to introduce set of contemporary issues and challenges that cross borders and affect every region of world.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: I A STD 31
CREDITS: 5 Units

Interdisciplinary survey designed as introduction to modern Southeast Asia.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CHICANO M102
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Theoretical and empirical overview of Chicana/Chicano educational issues in U.S., with special emphasis on disentangling effects of race, gender, class, and immigrant status on Chicana/Chicano educational attainment and achievement. Examination of how historical, social, political, and economic forces impact Chicana/Chicano educational experience.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ANTHRO 139
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Course Description Coming Soon!

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: GLBL ST 188A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Study of phenomenon of globalization through prominent case of Los Angeles. Focus on how city produces global culture, including filmed entertainment and culture of celebrity and food; and how it absorbs cultural inputs from world over. Emphasis on interactive relationship between export and import of global culture. City’s distinct cultural milieu influences nature of its cultural exports, but its viability as cultural capital depends on its ability to accommodate integrate diversity of cultures. Study creates immersive experience through films, guest speakers, and urban field trips.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HUM2513 / HIS3513
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 48 contact hours

This course will provide students with an introduction to Costa Rican history and culture. The socio-economic and political features that have shaped and defined the history and development path of Costa Rica will be explored. The major social issues that have emerged to the present day will be uncovered to provide the student with an understanding of how Costa Rica’s present day culture has been shaped. Students will have the opportunity to explore 3 main areas: (i) the historical dynamics that have influenced contemporary Costa Rica’s cultural profile, (ii) the global and regional dynamics that have influenced the history and cultural development of Costa Rica, and (iii) Costa Rican characteristics in its present day society and culture.

COURSE: POL3100
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 48 contact hours

This course is a general survey of the complex social and political heritage of Costa Rican society, examined through a comprehensive and multidisciplinary view focusing on the historical development and present-day dynamics of economy, society, polity, natural resources and culture. This course analyses the growth of Costa Rican culture through its history, studying the development of those elements that relate to the values of peace and democracy, which have become the standard bearers that identify this society. Emphasis is paid to the way these basic principles are enriched, highlighted and respected in different periods of history, to the point of becoming firmly entrenched in the value systems of society. Special attention will be given to contemporary issues of peace, democracy, environment, economic and political trends, population, and the emergence of old and new paradigms and ideological movements.

COURSE: PSY3050
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 48 contact hours

This course introduces students to the field of psychology, and examines the influence of culture on human behaviour and cognitive processes. “Culture” is defined as the shared norms, values and behaviours of groups, and of the individuals within those groups. We will focus on such topics as cultural factors in self-concept, gender roles, motivation, cognition, emotions, relationships and social values. Our exploration will be based on psychological theories, research, guest lecturers and field experiences.

COURSE: POL3450
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 48 contact hours

The course will analyse aspects of economic integration, globalisation and conditions needed for successful integration between economies, and the effects of free trade and protectionism in the region. Special focus will be given to foreign investments and joint ventures in Latin America.

COURSE: ISSU9IR
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 2

This module explores contemporary issues and debates that shape world politics today. It starts by introducing International Relations (IR) theory before turning to two broad themes that dominate IR: conflict and peace. We will apply these themes to a case study of the Northern Ireland conflict exploring the key political developments and the transition to a post conflict settlement. This module will also include a workshop that examines the use of wall murals to articulate conflict/post-conflict identity in Northern Ireland.

Excursion(s): This module includes a day trip to St Andrews, where we’ll undertake a tour of Scotland’s Secret Bunker – an underground compound built to safeguard Scotland during the Cold War.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ISSU9SC
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 2

For the past decade, Scotland’s national status has been ‘both dangled before us and tantalizingly withheld’ (poet Don Paterson). With attention focused on the question of independence, recent debates concerning Scottish culture and identity gain a heightened political charge. Literature has not only reflected but actively shaped such debate. In the year the new Scottish Parliament was established (1998), Christopher Whyte argued that ‘in the absence of elected political authority, the task of representing the nation has been repeatedly devolved to its writers’. But what influence have writers played in recent political change, and to what extent has Scottish culture escaped its own stereotypes?

This course examines the literary and political currents shaping contemporary Scottish identity, introducing students to key twentieth- and twenty-first century texts. We encounter and explain a range of cultural debates concerning language, class, democracy and nationhood, attending to the urgency as well as the complexity of recent Scottish writing.

Excursion: There will be an excursion to Edinburgh, visiting the Scottish Parliament building and Scottish Writers Museum.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
CREDITS: 3 US / 4 Japanese credits (45 contact hours)
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 2

In this course students will experience interdisciplinary studies based on global citizenship and cross-cultural understanding. The course content includes class discussions about Japanese lifestyle and culture, global issues, multicultural understanding, cross-cultural communication, peace building, current events as well as current event analysis through the newspaper, and global citizenship as related to culture, environment, politics, drama, music and film. The course will meet independently and will also join other on-going classes at the University related to the course topics together with Japanese students in order to enhance the learning and cross-cultural experience.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1

This course introduces important issues and major topics in modern international relations and with discussion on Japan and it’s relation to course content. Current events will be discussed and how states interact with each other. Subjects covered will be international cooperation, trade, international law, security, conflict and human rights issues.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1

This course is a survey of Japanese popular culture with particular topics covered such as anime manga, fashion, music, art and food. Part of the course will focus on Japanese animation within a historic and popular cultural perspective. Both anime and manga will be examined with particular emphasis on the art, culture and national and international popularity.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 3

This course will provide a general overview of Japanese society and culture in the postwar period. This course will introduce students to the historical background and modern social implications of contemporary Japanese culture. We will explore a wide range of artistic mediums including music, art, manga, animation, fashion, advertising, and film. Topics will include hikikomori (shut-ins that refuse to leave the home for work or school), chronic over-work including karoshi (death from overworking), declining population and the population bomb, and extreme population density in cities. In addition, the concepts of kaizen (continuous improvement), and wa (social harmony) will be introduced and analysed.

COURSE: ICML 160
CREDITS: 4 Thai credits

Provides vocabulary and structures for everyday use and introduces basic aspects of Thai culture. After successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Handle basic communicative situations such as asking for and giving directions, ordering food and risks, asking for prices and bargaining, and buying tickets
  2. Understand the importance of rice farming and ceremonies involving growing rice and Buddhism in daily life
One Moment...

Adventure Awaits

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive the latest updates on all CISaustralia programs, scholarships, news and more!