Social Sciences Courses

Take Social Science courses overseas to enhance your career prospects! Choose from hundreds of courses in a wide range of subjects, including Anthropology, Cultural and International Studies, Gender Studies, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Social Work and more!
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Available Courses by Program
CREDITS: 20 UK credits / 40 hours face to face in class lecture + tutorial hours

This module focuses on the ways in which non-fiction media such as news, documentary, advertising, lifestyle journalism and popular factual television articulate and explore contemporary experiences of profound social change. It focuses especially on the changing landscape of social class, race and ethnicity and asks how the media engages with these changes and presents them to its publics.

This course is a second year module (Level 5 of British system).

CREDITS: 20 UK credits / 40 hours face to face in class lecture + tutorial hours

Globalisation is a process crossing social boundaries. It also crosses disciplinary divisions. This module is therefore designed to be an introduction to thinking about the new world order where moral, economic, political and ecological issues are intertwined with a debate about the future of society. This is now a vogue topic in both academic and public spheres and a crucially important subject in current sociological debates.

This course is a second year module (Level 5 of British system).

COURSE: ICBS302
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

This seminar course will provide an overview of theoretical perspectives, research methods, empirical findings, and practical applications of psychological research on prejudice, stigma, and intergroup relations. Students will better understand psychological principles underlying prejudiced attitudes and discriminatory behaviours, gain a more objective view of their personal beliefs and behaviours, and further develop their ability to critically think about the nature of evidence and arguments from a scientific perspective.

COURSE: ICSS 306 M01
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

This seminar course considers the ways in which New York has been rebuilt and redefined by people and institutions since the late nineteenth century. Topics include: Wall Street and trusts; Gilded Age politics; water, parks, and mass transportation; apartment houses, tenements, and housing reform; class warfare and the labour movement; fine arts and popular amusements; national mass culture and the 1920s boom; Depression and Fiorello La Guardia; Robert Moses and urban renewal; suburbanisation; the urban crisis; the new immigrants; globalisation and postindustrial reform.

COURSE: IS 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

This course will examine various aspects of the relationship between sport and society in Spain, with a particular emphasis on sports with a long tradition in Catalonia. We will examine both the impact of sport on Spanish society and the influence of society on the practice of sport in Spain. The course begins with a consideration of general theoretical questions in the study of sport before moving on to an account of the historical development of sports in Spain in general and in Catalonia in particular. We also examine the reciprocal influences of sport violence, gender, race and ethnic and national identities in Spain.

CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1

This course examines the main political and socio-economic processes that help understand present-day Barcelona, particularly after the 1992 Olympics turned it into a vibrant global city. Through the lens of politics, human geography and history, students will explore topics like massive tourism, gentrification, environmental sustainability, the real state bubble, or immigration dynamics. Special attention will be paid to the tense power relations between Catalonia and Spain, the political heritage of Franco’s fascist dictatorship and the rise of the Catalan independence movement.

COURSE: MET SO 501
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in Sociology. A socio-cultural history of Boston’s North End that examines changes in the area from the first Puritan settlement to the current period of gentrification, with central attention given to the dynamics of culture change among the Italian immigrants. Covers the impact of global changes on local processes, changes in American notions of identity and inclusion, and ethnic succession and competition; religious change, social organization, and Catholic festivals; William Foote Whyte’s “Street Corner Society”; myths and realities of “the Mafia” and impact of urban decline and drug violence in the North End in the 70s and 80s; tourism, food marketing, and gentrification. Course includes two visits to the North End, including dinner in a North End restaurant on the final night of the course.

There is an additional USD $100 fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS SO 205
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Examines the family as a historically and geographically contingent social construction. How families in the U.S. are organized. Considers diverse family formations and intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the operation of family dynamics and politics.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS SO 352 / CAS WS 352
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Considers the biological and social organization of masculinities; the ways culture reproduces/articulates masculinities, particularly with regard to race and class; how masculine identities are expressed; male privilege; alternative masculinities; and what is at stake in negotiating contemporary masculinities.

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COURSE: CAS WS 302 / CAS SO 390
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Topics in Sociology. Examines social forces shaping gender discrepancies in crime. Using a feminist lens, students explore how cultural ideologies about masculinity and femininity shape criminalization, victimization, and offending. Topics include the gendered contexts of crime and punishment, gender-based violence, and intimate labor.

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COURSE: MET CJ 510
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Special Topics in Criminal Justice. Starting in the 1980s, America experienced an unprecedented increase in the use of incarceration as a form of punishment. Although criminal justice reform movements and policy changes have recently slowed the growth in America’s prison population, America’s incarceration rate remains among the highest in the world. This course investigates the social, political, and historical roots of the mass incarceration “experiment,” and examines the consequences it has had and continues to have on individuals, families, communities, governments, and society. The course also focuses on the implications that mass incarceration has on the operation, management, and leadership of correctional agencies. Students will assess and debate public policy options for further reform. Class discussions include specialized experts from a variety of perspectives and evaluation of prominent readings that have taken stock of America’s experience with mass incarceration over the past several decades.

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COURSE: CAS SO 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

An introduction to the major theories and basic principles of sociological analysis. Explores culture, media, socialization, race and ethnicity, globalization, capitalism, gender and sexuality, inequality and poverty, power in American society, and health and medicine from a sociological perspective.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Individual in Community, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS PO 300
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Special Topics in American Politics. How do Americans think about race and how does attitude influence political preferences? Students first look into traditional understandings of race and public opinion and then examine recent developments promising to change the role of racial attitudes in American Politics.

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COURSE: CAS SO 240
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Introduction to sociological perspectives on sexuality. Historical and comparative analysis of sexuality, with a focus on the social and cultural institutions that shape sexuality in the contemporary U.S.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS PS 261
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS PS 101).

Provides an understanding of how behavior, feelings, and thoughts of individuals are influenced and determined by characteristics of a situation. Topics include attraction, attitudes, prejudice, social rules, aggression, person perception, and groups. Readings cover theories, experimental research, and application.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

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COURSE: CAS SO 215
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Social, cultural, and intercultural factors in health and illness. Training and socialization of medical professionals, roots of medical power and authority, organization and operation of health care facilities. U.S. health care system and its main problems. Comparison of health care systems in the U.S. and in other countries.

Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Ethical Reasoning.

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COURSE: CAS AA 207 / CAS SO 207
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Social definition of race and ethnicity. The adjustment of different ethnic groups and their impact upon U.S. social life. How prejudice and discrimination create class identities and how caste relations have affected patterns of integration during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

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COURSE: CAS AA 335 / CAS SO 335 / CAS WS 335
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: at least one prior 100- or 200-level sociology course, CAS WS 101/102, or consent of the instructor.

Examines race, class, gender, and sexuality as intersecting axes of stratification, identity, and experience. Draws heavily from feminist theories in both sociology and history in order to analyze how these intersections can be applied to understanding social problems and structures.

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COURSE: CAS WR 152
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Writing, Research, & Inquiry with Digital/Multimedia Expression. Despite claims that we live in a “post-racial” time, the idea of race has undeniable consequences for American citizens and institutions alike. This seminar examines the ways in which the lived experiences of Americans of various backgrounds are represented in contemporary literature and media. What do specific representations reveal about race- and ethnicity-based stereotypes? How do specific representations reflect or counter typical narratives about the conditions of life for people of color in America? How do these representations minimize or celebrate the complexities of experience? Students have the opportunity to consider these questions as they undertake their own research on a particular representation of race/ethnicity in America. Texts may include Vanessa Hua’s Deceit and Other Possibilities, Claudia Rankine’s poetry and essays, and Aziz Ansari’s Master of None.

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COURSE: FWFSIF320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the development and structure of the Italian family through history with the following topics: Sexuality and the development of relationships, study of individuals, groups, and families, diversity in modern families, community regulations/policies addressing issues of family change, crisis, and maintenance. Students will conduct evaluation of different styles and examples of interpersonal communication behaviours. The course will also compare and contrast family/individual behaviour patterns associated with human life cycle transitions and examine various social issues associated with the study of Italian families.

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COURSE: FWCACC350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as “social creatures”. Italy represents a unique case for how food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society.

This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Food labs twice a week, one aperitivo project shift per session.

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COURSE: GSDGSR350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

Beginning with an examination of the “how to” advice manuals common to Italian households during the Renaissance period, this course explores various aspects of sexuality in Renaissance Italy. These aspects range from the aforementioned self-help books aimed at instructing young couples in sexual pleasure, to conception and childbirth, and an examination of the differing social roles of the common prostitute (meretrice) and the high class courtesan (cortigiana). The theme of male homosexuality will also be explored with special focus placed on the intellectual climate of Renaissance Florence where the prevailing interest in Neoplatonic philosophy may have played a part in creating a more lenient moral climate for homosexuals. Discussions will take cue from Renaissance art in which erotic subjects became increasingly popular in courtly circles in the sixteenth century. Museum visits form an integral part of this course.

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COURSE: LAPYSP300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

“We see the world as we do, not because that is the way it is, but because we have these ways of seeing” (Wittgenstein). Social psychology is a scientific discipline that explores how the individual is influenced by social contexts. Students will learn to identify how social, environmental, and cognitive factors shape our thoughts, feelings, and actions. The course covers theories regarding attraction, aggression, conformity, and pro-social behaviour. As this course is taught in Italy, students will have the advantage of observing and testing theories learned in class in a foreign environment.

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COURSE: COMM 157
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Analysis of how following personal lives of media-created celebrities impacts self-esteem, connectedness, and personal relationships from cultural studies and social sciences perspectives, and how entities cultivate celebrity for financial gain. Topics include celebrity gossip and privacy, news sharing, public relations, and impact of social media on fan support, image construction, and damage control.

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COURSE: CHICANO 180
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Overview of Chicana/Chicano schooling issues in U.S., with special emphasis on several important historical events that exemplify struggle for educational justice and equity that affected Chicana/Chicano education–Mendez versus Westminster (1947) desegregation case and 1968 high school Chicana/Chicano student walkouts. Through oral history projects, documentation of legacy of Sylvia Mendez, who experienced segregation in one Mexican school in 1940s, Sal Castro, Chicano teacher and central figure in 1968 walkouts, and Chicano Youth Leadership Conference (CYLC). Examination of how historical, social, and political forces have impacted Chicana/Chicano educational experiences.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 134
CREDITS: 5 Units

Theories of relation of variations in personality to culture and group life, in primitive and modern societies, and influence of social role on behavior.

Designed for juniors/seniors.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 101
CREDITS: 5 Units

Comparative survey of basic concepts and theories in sociology from 1850 to 1920.

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COURSE: CHICANO M106B / GENDER M104C / SOL WLF M104C
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of complexity of variables related to diversity of aging population and variability in aging process. Examination of gender and ethnicity within context of both physical and social aging, in multidisciplinary perspective utilizing faculty from variety of fields to address issues of diversity.

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COURSE: DIS STD M125 / LGBTQS M125
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of identity as means of understanding cultural formations, dominant/non-dominant power dynamics, and systems of visual representation. Intersectional approach to explore how ability and sexuality intersect, overlap, and change notions of identity. Use of scholarly texts from disability studies, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender studies, popular culture, performance, and film to investigate factors that shape ability and sexuality as basis for identity. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

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COURSE: PUB AFF 80
CREDITS: 5 Units

Overview of major theoretical, conceptual, and empirical traditions in study of human development. Exploration of how diverse cultural, social, socioeconomic, and historical contexts interact with biological, cognitive, and psychological processes to affect individuals during key developmental periods (such as early childhood, childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, and late adulthood). Topics may include historical changes in families, schools, neighborhoods, and workplace; economic conditions of families, schools, and neighborhoods; enduring effects of childhood on adult well-being; and impact of ascribed characteristics such as gender, race, and nationality on individuals’ environments, pathways, and outcomes.

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COURSE: URBN PL 120
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Survey of urban history and evolution in U.S., urban social theory, current growth trends, system of cities, urban economy and economic restructuring, traditional and alternative location theories, urban transportation, and residential location and segregation.

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COURSE: INTL DV 1
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of historical and contemporary context of socioeconomic inequalities between Global South and Global North. Focus on cultural, political, and economic realities of developing world, which includes countries of Asia, eastern Europe, Africa, Middle East, and Latin America.

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COURSE: LBR&WS 10
CREDITS: 5 Units

Assumptions about work, including why some work is favored, whether those with good jobs really are better people than those without, and how this understanding of work and value came to be common sense. Unpacking of these and other assumptions about work, value, and power, with focus on low-wage workers, their communities, and their place in contemporary society.  

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COURSE: SOL WLF 100A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Origin and development of major U.S. social welfare programs and policies guiding them, with emphasis on analysis of policy developments/issues related to provision of social welfare services. Study of historical and current responses of profession to major social problems.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 20
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to methods used in contemporary sociological research, with focus on issues of research design, data collection, and analysis of data.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 1
CREDITS: 5 Units

Survey of characteristics of social life, processes of social interaction, and tools of sociological investigation.

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COURSE: URBN PL M140
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of key issues (work, housing, and neighborhoods) in urban poverty, with particular focus on Mexican and Central American immigrant populations in Los Angeles. Exploration of major theoretical models that explain urban poverty and application of them in comparative context while exploring differences between Mexican and Central American immigrants. Social conditions and forces that help us understand lives of poor people in comparative context while looking at differences between two major Latino-origin populations in Los Angeles. Critical analysis of new forms of urban poverty in contemporary American society.

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COURSE: APPLING 30W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of range of topics related to study of language and social interaction in both mundane and professional settings, particularly how language affects social lives and how social organization affects use of language. Topics include different approaches to study of language in social interaction (theories and research methodologies), issues regarding language and social identity (such as socioeconomic status, race, gender, and situational identity), and issues concerning language and culture (such as cross-cultural misunderstanding and language socialization). Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 169
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Specific topics may include law in preindustrial and industrialized societies, legalization of contemporary social relations, participants’ experiences of legal processes, lay perceptions of justice, social movements toward equal justice, roles of lawyers and judges, social impact of court decisions.

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COURSE: CHICANO M102
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Theoretical and empirical overview of Chicana/Chicano educational issues in U.S., with special emphasis on disentangling effects of race, gender, class, and immigrant status on Chicana/Chicano educational attainment and achievement. Examination of how historical, social, political, and economic forces impact Chicana/Chicano educational experience.

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COURSE: DIS STD M139 / PSYCH M139
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Genealogy of autism as diagnostic category and cultural phenomenon from its historical roots as new, rare, and obscure condition in early 1940s to its current contested status as minority identity and/or global epidemic. Examination of material sourced from various fields and disciplines invested in autism, including psychology, neuroscience, arts and humanities, popular media, anthropology, activism, and critical autism studies. Students encounter and analyze multiple perspectives on autism and put them in conversation with one another. Attention paid to way people on spectrum define, explain, and represent their own experiences of autism and discussion of what ramifications of these multiple framings are in context of autism intervention strategy and disability policy today.

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COURSE: DIS STD 101W
CREDITS: 5 Units

Creation of critical framework for understanding concept of disability from sampling of disciplinary perspectives. Organized around productive and central tension in disability studies–between disability as lived subjective experience that is both individual and communal, and disability as objective, medical, legal, and sometimes stigmatized category. Students encouraged to make connections between units and to create their own perspectives on disability in field that defines itself by how it changes. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 101.

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COURSE: URBN PL 141
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Overview of planning history, theory, and contemporary issues that affect low-income communities, communities of color, and underserved neighborhoods, particularly in Los Angeles area. Field of planning offers distinct perspectives and opportunities for improving vulnerable communities. Topics range from discussion of intersection between race and income, critical race theory, community development, residential segregation, spatial mismatch, and environmental justice to social justice.

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COURSE: RELIGN 11
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Introduction to varieties of religious experience in Los Angeles and its environs. Presentations, required readings, and (where possible) site visits to examine selected faiths and spiritual practices throughout Southern California and provide deeper understanding of myriad ways that sacred is made manifest and encountered. Foundational academic orientations within study of religion (anthropological, historical, psychological, sociological, etc.) used as framework to examine and interpret almost unparalleled religious diversity of City of Angels. Recognizing that spiritual traditions are crucial reflection of region’s ever-changing demographics, emphasis on role of ethnicity, gender, nationality, and race in shaping of religious landscape.

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COURSE: GENDER 113
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Analysis of variety of contemporary sex work both in U.S. and abroad from feminist perspective. Examination of how race, class, and gender alter experience and perception of erotic labor, and consideration of critically feminist responses by range of authors to sex work. Topics include brothels, phone sex, strip clubs, sex tourism, military prostitution, and international traffic in persons. Reading of texts by sex workers, as well as articles from current philosophical and policy debates about prostitution.

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COURSE: GEOG 145
CREDITS: 4-5 Units

Pre-requisite: One course from Geography 3, Geography 4, Anthropology 3, Gender Studies 10 or Sociology 1.

Exploration of how, why, and to what ends human trafficking has been conceptualized as global problem that warrants international response. Examination of recent activist, governmental, scholarly, and media responses, and reflection on what is and is not accomplished by them. Questions of human trafficking are implicitly geographical, requiring consideration of ways freedom is spatially defined and how movement across borders is encouraged and regulated. How questions of labor, migration, sexuality, rights, ethics, embodiment, representation, and governance pertain to human trafficking. What people mean when they speak of human trafficking as slavery. Meanings of slavery and freedom in world today using examples from U.S. and Europe, with focus on Philippines as case study for exploring both contemporary examples and historical forms of enslavement.

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COURSE: PSYCH 135
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Interrelationships between the individual and his social environment. Social influences on motivation, perception, and behavior. Development and change of attitudes and opinions. Psychological analysis of small groups, social stratification, and mass phenomena.

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Designed for juniors/seniors.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 147A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Sociological theories of social origins, organization, and meanings of crime and criminal behaviors.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 128
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Sociological theories and explanations of social conditions shaping and producing emotional experiences; effects of individual expression of emotions on social conditions; relations between thought, sensations, and emotions; self and emotions; social construction of emotions.

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COURSE: GENDER M162 / SOCIOL M162
CREDITS: 5 Units

Enforced requisite: Gender Studies 10 or Sociology 1.

Examination of processes by which gender is socially constructed. Topics include distinction between biological sex and sociological gender, causes and consequences of gender inequality, and recent changes in gender relations in modern industrial societies.

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COURSE: COMM M147
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Studies in relationship between mass communication and social organization. Topics include history and organization of major media institutions, social forces that shape production of mass media news and entertainment, selected studies in media content, and effects of media on society.

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COURSE: DIS STD M161 / GENDER M161
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Since creation of International Olympic Committee in 1894, athletes with disabilities have had, and been denied, formal opportunities to compete with able-bodied athletes. Overview of some major topics of discussion concerning intersections of athletic competition and disability, addressing variety of perspectives and themes on disability and sport, such as passing, sports integration, competition versus charity, and masculinity. Sources include readings, film, television, and biographical writings that address sports, body and disability generally, and Special Olympics specifically.

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COURSE: DIS STD M121 / GENDER M121
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Ways in which issues of disability are affected by gender, with particular attention to various roles, positions, and concerns of women with disabilities. Approach is intersectional, exploring how social categories of class, race, ethnicity, religion, age, sexuality, nationality, and citizenship affect and are affected by gender and disability. Topics may include law (civil rights, nondiscrimination), representation (arts, literature), education, public policy, health. May be repeated for credit with topic and instructor change.

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COURSE: ANTHRO 146
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Designed for junior/senior social sciences majors. Introduction to modern industrial cities and urban life. Examination of notion of urban space in context of social relations by drawing from historical and cross-cultural urban ethnographies. Urban space is created according to needs of capital and actions of urban subjects. Exploration of ways in which class, gender, race, and geography shape or contest perspectives and priorities on urban issues. P/NP or letter grading.

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COURSE: PUB AFF 110
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of potentialities and challenges of 21st-century urban revolution in global context. Introduction of theoretical frameworks and conceptual methods used by urban studies and planning to study cities and urban transformations, and historical and contemporary analysis of urbanization to learn about key urban processes such as agglomeration, segregation, gentrification, and suburbanization. Students learn about institutions and policies governing transportation and housing, and forms of community organizing and civil society that seek to redress urban inequalities. Introduction to key theories of space and utopian visions of urbanism.

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COURSE: SOCIOL 158
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Description and analysis of urbanization and urbanism in the U.S. and world.

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COURSE: POL3100
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 48 contact hours

This course is a general survey of the complex social and political heritage of Costa Rican society, examined through a comprehensive and multidisciplinary view focusing on the historical development and present-day dynamics of economy, society, polity, natural resources and culture. This course analyses the growth of Costa Rican culture through its history, studying the development of those elements that relate to the values of peace and democracy, which have become the standard bearers that identify this society. Emphasis is paid to the way these basic principles are enriched, highlighted and respected in different periods of history, to the point of becoming firmly entrenched in the value systems of society. Special attention will be given to contemporary issues of peace, democracy, environment, economic and political trends, population, and the emergence of old and new paradigms and ideological movements.

COURSE: SOCY 3050
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 48 contact hours

This course will study the LGBTQI+ community and related social issues in the Latin American context. Special attention will be given to the Costa Rican case study where sexuality, identity, expression, health, community, family, and other social, political and lifestyle issues will be discussed. This course offers students one of the only opportunities to study LGBTQ+ Latin American dynamics and issues. It is one of the first of its kind in the region and a pioneering offer for study abroad students in the Costa Rican setting.

This is a young, but growing field of study in Latin America and definitely one that deserves much attention, especially as the Latin American region is home to some of the most homophobic countries in the world and at the same time undergoing radical change in terms of its acceptance of the complete spectrum of sexuality and identity expression. This course has three main objectives: 1) students will be invited to explore LGBTQI+ Latin American community issues, 2) to appreciate how particular countries are advancing in relation to equality before the law while studying the social groups pushing for change, and 3) to critically assess present day contexts that are struggling with recently developed anti-discriminatory frameworks.

COURSE: POL3220
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 48 contact hours

The course introduces students to the theories and practices of international human migration as a phenomenon that, while present throughout history, has particular emphasis in today’s world. With human ramifications, its strong societal effects are evident on both ends of the issue—the nations from which people leave, and the targeted destinations. We will review the phenomenon based on its most prominent manifestations: forced migrations, voluntary migrations and internal displacements of groupings of people, and the motivational underpinnings that provoke such drastic actions as the uprooting of home and family in pursuit of presumably better opportunities.

Migration is perceived by peoples in despair as an alternative to heavily weighing social, political and/or economic conditions, even when factoring in risks such as personal safety and adaptation to an unknown culture. Within this framework, we will analyse issues such as return migrations, the effects of remittances, the formation of diaspora communities, and the myriad of problems brought about by cultural adaptation and assimilation.

COURSE: ISSU9DM
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 1

This strategic communications module will give an introduction to methods and tools for the understanding, analysis and manipulation of social data. Students will learn about social network analysis, sentiment analysis and topic modelling. They will develop an understanding of how these can help marketers work on their strategies, how journalists write their stories and policymakers take decisions. This module gives students the opportunity to learn about the basic models of social data analysis and cutting-edge methods and software for data analysis.

COURSE: ISSU9RC
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 1

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the sociological and analytic study of religion, identity, conflict and violence within a local, national and global context. It will examine issues such as nationalism, colonialism, international affairs and the role of those charged with reporting such conflicts. Extensive attention will be paid to the representation of religious conflict in the arts, such as literature and films, alongside a detailed examination in of the violent groups that have arisen as an apparent reaction to religious fundamentalism as a rising narrative of a new cultural war.

Excursion(s): Students will attend a guided visit to Stirling Castle.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 3

This course will provide a general overview of Japanese society and culture in the postwar period. This course will introduce students to the historical background and modern social implications of contemporary Japanese culture. We will explore a wide range of artistic mediums including music, art, manga, animation, fashion, advertising, and film. Topics will include hikikomori (shut-ins that refuse to leave the home for work or school), chronic over-work including karoshi (death from overworking), declining population and the population bomb, and extreme population density in cities. In addition, the concepts of kaizen (continuous improvement), and wa (social harmony) will be introduced and analysed.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 2

The focus of this course is to give an expansive outline of gender, sexuality and society with a specific spotlight on contemporary Japanese society. Class content exposes material from sociologists, historians, journalists, and literary scholars to analyse how gender and sexuality have been socially developed and experienced in post war Japan.

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