Health Sciences Courses

Studying overseas in Health helps you graduate on time and gives you that competitive edge! Experience different healthcare systems while learning from experts in your field of study. Gain experience in areas such as Exercise and Sports Science, Nursing, Nutrition, Public and Community Health and more!
FILTER BY
Program Types:
  • January Study
  • July Study
  • Language Study
Countries:
  • Australia
  • Cambodia
  • Canada
  • China & Hong Kong
  • Costa Rica
  • England
  • Fiji
  • France
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Nepal
  • Netherlands
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Scotland
  • Singapore
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • USA
  • Zambia
Area of Study:
  • Health Sciences
    • Clinical / Lab Technician
    • Exercise / Sports Science and Sports Management
    • Medical / Pharmaceutical
    • Nursing
    • Nutrition and Food Studies
    • Occupational and Speech Therapy
    • Public and Community Health

Need a recommendation? Contact us and we can assist you in finding the right program.

ENQUIRE NOW
Available Courses by Program
COURSE: EXERSCI 105
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to the risks and benefits of exercise, exercise policy and safety, physical fitness testing, guidelines for exercise test administration, principles of exercise prescription, cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular training.

COURSE: EXERSCI 100G
CREDITS: 15 points

An introduction to the principles of physical exercise, with a focus on understanding how the body moves and responds to exercise, how performance can be measured, and how fitness can be developed and maintained to optimise health. Particular emphasis will be placed on the debunking of common myths about exercise, and offering evidence-based advice on the benefits of appropriate physical activity.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

COURSE: EDUC 104G
CREDITS: 15 points

Critically examines the socio-cultural, political and economic significance of sport within Aotearoa New Zealand. Examines how sport is embedded in the lives of people, constitutes identities, and is connected to major spheres of social life and various social issues. Through focusing on select sporting issues it analyses how New Zealanders negotiate understandings of self, ethnicity, gender, sexualities, health, and lifestyle.

Note: This course has very limited enrolment availability. It is recommended that students apply early and have a second choice course option.

COURSE: FWFCFC340 / LSSOFC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as “made in Italy” culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism, and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and/or tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWDNNS350 / SHSSN350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January

Pre-requisite: Introduction to Nutrition or equivalent.

This course is a study of the importance of nutrition in sports and exercise in order to maximize athletic potential and performance. Covered topics include food nutrients, role of water, bioenergetics in exercise and training, heat and fluid regulation during physical activity, weight, and eating behaviors. Students are encouraged to form educated and strategic regimens (exercise and dietary plans) from both scientific and holistic approaches for professional athletes and physically active individuals.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCFF347
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, 4, A, B

The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and cultural scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities; encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence’s thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits. This is a Food and Culture course, not a CA/BP lab course. Food labs emphasize the food culture of Italy and are not based on professional cooking techniques.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: SPO 480
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

During the 20th century the sports industry has grown exponentially from its origins as an amateur pastime to a complex phenomenon that moves billions of dollars on a global scale. While sports have been affected by and simultaneously contributed to accelerated globalizing tendencies, some important distinctions can be made between sports industry models in the US and Europe (Szymanski, 2009). Focusing on the European sports industry, this course highlights the structures and systems of governance, and the ownership, financing and management of leagues, teams, facilities and events. Case studies examined include Euroleague Basketball, FC Barcelona, the English Premier League, London 2012 Olympic Games, and innovations in new stadium developments in Europe.

The comparison continues with an analysis of media rights negotiations and commercialization processes for major sports such as Cycling, F1 and Moto Sports. The role of sports marketing, in particular the management of endorsement deals and brands by leading sports apparel companies such as Nike, Adidas and Puma in US and European markets are compared. Throughout the course critical analysis of key issues and controversies affecting the sports industry in Europe is undertaken, including the over-commercialization of sports, ethical scandals involving sports betting, systemic racism in sports and the sustainability of team and league business models.

COURSE: IS 320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours

The aim of this course is to analyze the important role that sport plays within modern Spanish and Catalan culture. The historical framework to this module will be provided by an analysis of the history of modern sport, the significance of the introduction of modern sport in early 20th Century Spain and Catalunya and its early adoption by groups in Spanish and Catalan society for socio-cultural and political purposes. Another important part of the course consists in a profound exploration of the socio-political use of sport by the Francoist dictatorship and the repercussions of this heritage on contemporary Spanish society. Towards the end of the semester, the course will focus on how sport has played an important part in the development of Spain as a democratic country after the end of the Francoist dictatorship. The relations between politics, media and sport will serve as a useful route to understanding wider issues in Spain and Catalunya and their mutual relationship. The module will adopt a hands-on approach to the subject matter including case studies, field trips and guest speakers as well as making constant comparisons with the sports and culture debate in the United States

COURSE: LAPLBE320 / LSHHBE320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course examines the ethics of medical practices and issues in contemporary society. Coursework will pose questions regarding areas that affect human life and death. Topics include practices such as euthanasia, birth control and abortion, cloning, genetic engineering, and biomedical research. Students will analyze the ethical nature of covered practices, how they affect humans on individual and social scales, and the relationship between patients and physicians and medical structures in terms of information, consent, and responsibility. Case studies from local European as well as non-European countries will be closely considered for discussion and study.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: LAPYAD290 / LSHHAD290
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

This course examines the practice and basic principles of addiction to drugs of abuse such as heroin, alcohol, tobacco, cannabis or cocaine. Course topics will cover the epidemiology of drug abuse, the experimental models used in brain research, and the pathological consequences of drug addiction (including heavy drinking and smoking). The course will extend the concept of addiction to pathological behaviors such as compulsive consumption of palatable food, physical exercise dependence, compulsive shopping, sexual hyperactivity, internet abuse, and gambling. The neurochemical mechanisms that are shared and lead from reward to positive reinforcement, loss of control, and dependence will be examined. The symptomatological and neurochemical similarities and differences between drug and behavioral addiction will be addressed, along with the self-destructive behaviors, tolerance, craving, and withdrawal symptoms that both types of dependence produce.

The course traces also the basic aspects of human biology and physiology that are needed to fully comprehend the topics at hand, including the neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters that are altered by both natural and artificial rewards. Students will also learn how to analyze scientific data and correctly interpret the information that is published in peer-reviewed international scientific journals. Finally, students will gain an understanding of the social and ethical implications of drug and behavioral addiction and of the peculiar features of this problem in different countries, with an emphasis on the European and Italian approach as compared with other areas of the world.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCFJ300 / GSANFJ300 / LSESFJ300 / LSSOFJ300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Where does our food come from? How is it grown? What is actually in the food we eat? These are all important questions that we don’t always want to know the answer to. Food justice is a social movement that examines the ethics of food production and food distribution, access to food, and the policies that are often a silent ingredient in our meals. Organic foods, farming, labor wages and practices, food supply distribution and waste, and sustainability are among the themes to be examined in this course. How food systems impact the health and well-being of individuals and communities, political policies and their role in food distribution in developed and developing countries, and the consequences of globalization on food ethics will be addressed through hands-on workshops, visits, and in-class discussions. A special emphasis will be placed on the cultural aspects of food supplies, the Italian traditions of food production and consumption, and the darker roles represented by food in organized crime and immigration.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCACC350 / FWFCCC350
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: A, B

Though food diversifies throughout the world according to local cultural backgrounds, there is a common ground in the universal approach to food: it is a part of everyday life and sharing food is still one of the greatest examples of humans acting as social creatures. Italy represents a unique case for now food is both celebrated and is involved in cultural celebrations that are still fundamental in Italian society. This course will provide students with a full immersion in the relationship between food and the local community in Italy, focusing on the many moments that represent conviviality in Italian culture and society. Coursework includes a wide variety of field learning activities through which students will be introduced to local and traditional crafts, food markets, typical street food vendors, local purchasing groups, community-supported agriculture, and countryside food festivals as fundamental milestones in the Italian gastro-social tradition. Through hands-on experiences and on-site activities students, will learn the fundamentals of community-geared food production and will acquire a deeper understanding of food as an essential element of society. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

This class includes food labs, food tours, and one aperitivo project per session. Uniform required for food labs, rental available upon arrival.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCFC340 / LSSOFC340
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 3, A, B

This course is targeted towards students with an interest in Italian food traditions, society, and culture. The main focus consists of what is generally defined as “made in Italy” culture and style in post-war Italy. Also covered are the relationships between Italian traditions, folklore and contemporary Italian society drawing from examples including festivals, food, tourism, and economy, and the influence of foreign civilizations. Students will be asked to regard the subject of food outside of the context of ingredients and the procedures used to create a dish; we will instead examine a large scale context in which food is either featured as a main component or an integral element in cultural situations. Thus the student is asked first and foremost to observe the presented material across an anthropologic lens that roves over the entire Italian peninsula. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and/or tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCAHW345 / FWFCHW345
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, 4, A, B

Italy represents longstanding traditions of food culture, wellness, and nutrition through health-oriented practices. Recent decades have represented a dramatic change in the way we approach health through the lens of food principles. Nutritional facts and information that are constantly updated and the ethics of sustainability have deeply influenced a global awareness of a healthy lifestyle. Italy’s approach to seasonality and nutritional balance is characterized by an abundance of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and a distinct respect for food. This course will provide students with a complete overview of how food can be the basis of wellness, along with the practice of a positive lifestyle through cultural understanding and integration with the local community. Particular emphasis will be placed, through discussions and direct practice, on seasonality and nutritional principles, whole foods, and freshness, traditional customs, and contemporary innovation. Course topics will also reference the aphorism of “We are what we eat” and how it aligns with the Italian culinary tradition and culture. Students will also complete a survey of the different dietary recommendations that have been researched and developed to examine how the field of dietetics is directly affected by social and cultural implications. Through hands-on experiences and on-site cultural activities, students will experience the fundamentals of wellness-oriented cuisine and lifestyles in Tuscany and Italy. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

This class includes experiential learning with CEMI. Three days of food labs, one day of walking tour. Uniform required for food labs, rental available upon arrival.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCNW220
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The best way to get to know a city is to explore it by foot, wander its streets, gain confidence with its social life and surroundings, breathe in every corner of it, and be captured by the unique views, perfumes, and, especially in Italy, the food. Jean Brunhes wrote “To eat is to incorporate a territory” mainly because food, its ingredients, and the rituals connected to it, have represented the mirror of society since ancient times.

This course offers a unique opportunity to immerse oneself into Florentine gastronomy and cultural background through neighborhood walks and tastings, using the city as one of most beautiful classrooms. Walking will give students the opportunity to see things that they otherwise would never see and to taste what’s hidden in between the tourist food attractions. Going by foot means to stumble across areas of the city that are not always intended for tourists, maybe less fancy or famous, perhaps calmer and more beautiful, possibly with the best food ever tasted, along with neighborhood stories and curiosities to be discovered in tiny galleries or in hidden food and wine shops. Florence and its treasures are ready to be unveiled.

Classes include tastings in gelaterie, gastronomie, enoteche, visits to food-related city spots, and suggestive walks in the secret Florence. The course is intended to provide academic knowledge through guided field learning activities that include research, on-site involvement, and topic assessment for each food and wine themed walk in Florence. The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material.

Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students’ academic and personal enrichment.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCTW300 / HCGHTW300 / LAPYTW300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 2, A

The garden is a space traditionally associated with food cultivation and recreational activity, both are known to have an influence on wellbeing. This course explores a culture of wellness based on the fundamentals of horticulture therapy and the use plants and green spaces, as well as horticultural and culinary activities to promote wellbeing. Students will explore the traditions related to garden activities to foster cognitive, social, emotional, and physical wellbeing for individuals and specific groups (i.e. the elderly, children, individuals with special needs) in a variety of settings. Adapting horticultural therapy in diverse site conditions from sowing to cultivation and the preparation of food products from the garden harvest will be a focus of this course. Course topics will include principles of horticulture, soils and soil cultivation, plant propagation, and harvesting, and the therapeutic potential of farm to table practices. Students will experience first-hand the restorative powers of green spaces through garden management and cooking labs to examine the benefits of the natural environment as a fundamental outcome of this course. This course includes an Experiential Learning Project with CEMI.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWDNIN305
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The continuous growth of nutritional awareness worldwide has brought nutrition to be one of the fundamental subjects in constant evolution during the last decades. This course provides students with basic nutrition concepts and focuses on the overview of the requirements and functions of protein, carbohydrates, lipids and the major vitamins and minerals that are determinants of health and diseases in human populations. Emphasis will be placed on the role of nutrition in growth and health through the life cycle and the role of diet in the development of chronic diseases and the maintenance of a good health status thanks to a balanced food consumption. The course offers an overview of food policies, food education and an analysis of nowadays eating habits. Students will also learn the guidelines for the balancing of a vegetarian diet and understand how to read a food pyramid.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWDNLN160 / GSHSLN160 / LSHHLN160 / SHSSLN160
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course offers a comprehensive approach to wellness, nutrition, and fitness from a lifetime perspective. Course topics will examine how healthy lifestyles span across the continuum of lifespans and ages with a focus on how dietary and fitness needs evolve throughout the four main life-stages: childhood, youth, adulthood, and for the elderly. Theoretical core concepts of how dietary and fitness needs are correlated to mental health and adapt according to each life-stage will be addressed along with a comparative focus on the Italian and Mediterranean approach. In addition to in-class lectures, the course features hands-on field experiences in nutrition labs for healthy diets and physical activities held in local Italian fitness facilities. Students will implement course topics and to cultivate student motivation for incorporating them into their own daily lives.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWCANC505
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Prerequisites: Three semesters of culinary arts or dietetics/nutrition coursework and Cooking Light: Contemporary Techniques for Health Living, or equivalent.

Starting from the previously acquired knowledge of macro and micro nutrients, this course will provide students with the tools to analyze and develop a wide variety of nutritionally balanced meals on a seasonal basis. Students will learn the fundamentals of metabolism and digestion and apply previously acquired cooking methods in order to preserve nutrients, and the possible applications of a wide variety of ingredients to create satisfying dishes while still respecting nutritional concepts.
Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of special dietary requirements either depending on dietary special needs or ethical choices. Raw foodism, vegetarian and vegan diet as well as the possible alternatives to guarantee a balanced nutrient intake will be thoroughly covered. The course will give students the tools to design meals on a seasonal basis following the principles of healthy cooking. This course includes experiential learning hours with our Community Engagement Member Institutions (CEMI).

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCFF347
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: January / July Sessions: 1, 2, 3, 4, A, B

The city of Florence is a veritable mine of food and cultural experiences spanning from the kitchens of the Medici family to the rustic regional cuisine of Tuscany, growing rituals such as aperitivo, and high profile restaurants recognized internationally. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the food, street, and cultural scenes that set Florence apart from other metropolitan cities; encourage the discussion of the historical weight of its storied past on the food culture of today, and construct a topographical map that indicates the pinpoints of Florence’s thriving gastro-cultural activities. Lectures will be complemented by student cooking labs and tastings.

This course includes cooking labs, tastings, and visits. This is a Food and Culture course, not a CA/BP lab course. Food labs emphasize the food culture of Italy and are not based on professional cooking techniques.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: FWFCSF300 / HPFBSF300 / LSESSF300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

Considering the renewed global interest in local sourcing and the growth of Km0 practices (locally produced), the study of sustainable food systems is an essential component in the education of an ethically-minded food industry learner. The course takes its cue from the Italian example based on regionalism and the table as an expression of local territories, and how these factors have influenced the national food industry. It analyzes the industry and the production of food (fish, meat, dairy, fruit, vegetables, and grains) and focuses on packaging, traceability (labels), and distribution while exploring the social aspect of the food supply chain. Sustainability principles will be analyzed, as well as case studies in Italian food and beverage service and retailing. A strong focus is placed on seasonality, food policies, and food education. The course objective is to provide students with a solid conceptual framework in order to analyze the Italian food industry and the food production system from a sustainable perspective. Through the understanding of the broader concept of sustainability, students will be able to explore the social, economic, and environmental implications of food production and consumption and to identify the global threats in terms of public health. Students will develop critical skills by analyzing sustainability as active citizens, consumers, and entrepreneurs. The analysis and rethinking of economic, social, and agricultural alternatives in the current food production system will also be developed. Lectures will be complemented by visits, food tours, tastings, and cooking labs.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: GSANWA300 / GSHSWA300 / GSUSWA300 / LAPLWA300 / SHSSWA300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 1, A

This course will introduce students to the world of walking as an artistic, philosophical, political, literary, inspirational – as well as physical – experience. While exploring different types of walking, the concept of “wanderlust” will also be analyzed and discussed from both an anthropological and philosophical perspective, to provide students with a thorough overview of the traveling and walking experience both in natural and urban landscapes. Different types of walking activities will be an integral component of the course, allowing students to reflect upon walking as an act of desire, escape, imagination, freedom, rebellion, and well-being.

The classroom approach of this course is based on experiencing the city of Florence as the academic space for learning and engagement. Classes are not held in a traditional, frontal-style setting; each lesson is carefully mapped for curricular content and featured locations: lectures, observations, exercises, analysis, and reflections on presented topics are held in relevant sites that are accounted for in the academic planning, syllabus, and related course material. Coursework and submissions will be regularly assessed on the MyFUA platform through daily assignments in addition to exams, papers, and projects. Learning through the on-site classroom approach fosters a deeper understanding of the cultural environment of Florence and how it is related to the subject of study represented by the course, and allows the overall experience to contribute to the students’ academic and personal enrichment.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: WL ARTS M79
CREDITS: 5 Units

Examination of issues of environmental and public health effects of intensive and extensive agriculture, influence of corporations on government, animal ethics, food deserts and urban gardening, and food insecurity. Focus on representation of such issues in documentaries, public lectures, memoirs, novels, and visual art, as well as on initiatives to address such problems through policy and activism.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: NURSING 50
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Epidemiology is interdisciplinary science with goal of identifying and describing patterns of disease occurrence, identifying determinants of disease, and evaluating disease prevention and health care treatment efforts. With its focus on human populations, epidemiology is directly linked with public health research, policy, and practice. Introduction to fundamental definitions, concepts, methods, and critical thinking used in epidemiologic study. Designed to lay foundation for future study to evaluate factors related to health outcomes in human populations using epidemiologic principles.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ENVIRON 25
CREDITS: 5 Units

Good food is healthy, sustainably produced, and culturally meaningful. Introduction to basic concepts and history of food systems, food science and nutrition, fair and sustainable food production, natural resources and environmental issues including climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and food policy and law, food distribution and access, cultural identity and artistic engagements with food.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: GEOG 125
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Impact of environment and lifestyle on individual health examined from geographical perspective, with examples from both developed and developing countries.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: CHICANO CM106 / PUB HLT M106
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of Chicano/Latino health status through life expectancy, causes of death, reportable diseases, services utilization, provider supply, and risk behaviors within demographic/immigration changes. Binational review of health effects in U.S. and Mexico.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HIST 179B
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Cultural, scientific, and social context that shaped modern medicine from Renaissance to Romantic era. Topics include establishment of anatomy, physiology, and modern clinical medicine, mapping of human body, medical approach to mental illness, rise of anatomo-clinical method at Paris School.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: COM HLT 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Limited to students in Public Health minor and graduate students.

Introductory course to provide non-Community Health Sciences M.P.H. students and qualified undergraduate students with broad and comprehensive overview of concepts, empirical research, and public health practice in community health sciences, with emphasis on social context and determinants of population health and principles of planning interventions to protect and improve public health. Ways to define and measure health and illness, social construction of illness, social and behavioral determinants of health, and health disparities, including socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, gender, and age. Social and behavioral theories of health-related behavior change, health promotion strategies and methods, and public policy. Case studies of evidence-based health promotion programs provided.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HLT POL 100
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Structure and function of American healthcare system; issues and forces shaping its future.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: PSYCH 150
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Areas of health, illness, treatment, and delivery of treatment that can be elucidated by understanding of psychological concepts and research, psychological perspective on these problems, and how psychological perspective might be enlarged and extended in medical area.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: NURSING 13
CREDITS: 5 Units

Structural presentation of human body, including musculoskeletal, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive systems. Laboratory uses virtual cadaver dissection and examination.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DIS STD M139 / PSYCH M139
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Genealogy of autism as diagnostic category and cultural phenomenon from its historical roots as new, rare, and obscure condition in early 1940s to its current contested status as minority identity and/or global epidemic. Examination of material sourced from various fields and disciplines invested in autism, including psychology, neuroscience, arts and humanities, popular media, anthropology, activism, and critical autism studies. Students encounter and analyze multiple perspectives on autism and put them in conversation with one another. Attention paid to way people on spectrum define, explain, and represent their own experiences of autism and discussion of what ramifications of these multiple framings are in context of autism intervention strategy and disability policy today.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: MUSC 188
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of young but quickly growing profession of music therapy in health care industry. Students gain comprehensive understanding of music therapy, what it takes to become board-certified music therapist, and standards of practice and research. Students gain ability to define music therapy and advocate its services within community, and general understanding of how to assess and carry out music therapy session. Students participate in classroom activities that include simple songwriting, lyric analysis, instrumentation, and discussion. Prior music training not required. Includes homework, research assignments, and quizzes. In final group project, students work together to assess hypothetical client and create two session plans with clearly stated objectives.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DIS STD M161 / GENDER M161
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Since creation of International Olympic Committee in 1894, athletes with disabilities have had, and been denied, formal opportunities to compete with able-bodied athletes. Overview of some major topics of discussion concerning intersections of athletic competition and disability, addressing variety of perspectives and themes on disability and sport, such as passing, sports integration, competition versus charity, and masculinity. Sources include readings, film, television, and biographical writings that address sports, body and disability generally, and Special Olympics specifically.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: DANCE 11
CREDITS: 2 Units

Beginning-level study of yoga.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: ISSU9SM
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 1

As Scotland’s University of Sporting Excellence, the University of Stirling is the perfect place to learn about the integration of culture, management and sport. The aim of this module is to teach you about how sport is managed in Scotland and in the UK mode widely, and about how it is incorporated into the thread of Scottish culture. The module will include a mixture of lectures and seminars accompanied by academic field trips, providing you with an understanding that sport is influenced by cultural traditions, social values and economic factors.

  Contact CISaustralia For Syllabus
COURSE: HHS 305
CREDITS: 3 CAD credits

What makes people healthy or unhealthy? The health of individuals is not only shaped by lifestyle choices or medical treatments, but also, to a large extent, by social conditions. This course offers an introduction to the social determinants of health and the social advantages and disadvantages that people experience based on their social position and social circumstances and how these influence their health and wellbeing. This course is designed to provide participants with an introduction to and appreciation of theoretical perspectives and empirical research on the social determinants of health.

This intensive interprofessional course provides participants with opportunities to develop and strengthen their understanding of the social determinants of health using local, regional, national and global perspectives. Participants critically examine social inequities, root causes and subsequent health consequences in diverse populations, particularly indigenous and/or marginalised populations.

The course is jointly administered by the VIU Faculty of International Education and the VIU Faculty of Health and Human Services. Students will be provided with a total of 42 hours of public health instruction, 4 hours of intercultural studies workshops, and a number of related field trips. Half-day trips include visits to the Canadian Mental Health Association, the Nanaimo Regional General Hospital (NRGH), the Tillicum Lelum Friendship Centre (indigenous health), and Kiwanis Village (assisted living for older people).

Upon successful completion of the program, students will receive a certificate of completion, and will be awarded 3 CAD credits by VIU.

Prerequisite: Second year standing in an undergraduate degree program

One Moment...

Adventure Awaits

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive the latest updates on all CISaustralia programs, scholarships, news and more!