Communications Courses

Communications and Public Relations are competitive fields, so having an international experience will allow you to navigate the tough job market with greater confidence. Overseas study is one of the best ways to keep up in today’s fast-paced, ever-changing global world. Regardless of which destination you choose, you will learn first-hand the ways in which cultural norms influence the practice of Communications, Journalism, Media and PR in that country.
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Program Types:
  • January Study
  • July Study
  • Language Study
Countries:
  • Belize
  • Cambodia
  • Canada
  • China & Hong Kong
  • Costa Rica
  • England
  • Fiji
  • France
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Nepal
  • Netherlands
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Scotland
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • Uganda
  • USA
  • Vietnam
  • Zambia
Area of Study:
  • Communications
    • Communications / Public Relations
    • Journalism, Film & TV and Media

Need a recommendation? Contact us and we can assist you in finding the right program.

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Available Courses by Program
CREDITS: 20 UK credits / 40 hours face to face in class lecture + tutorial hours

This module focuses on the ways in which non-fiction media such as news, documentary, advertising, lifestyle journalism and popular factual television articulate and explore contemporary experiences of profound social change. It focuses especially on the changing landscape of social class, race and ethnicity and asks how the media engages with these changes and presents them to its publics.

This course is a second year module (Level 5 of British system).

COURSE: MGMT-X 403.31
CREDITS: 4 US credits / Approx. 36 classroom contact hours

With the entertainment industry converging into a worldwide mass media, both business and operation models continue to rapidly evolve. This introductory course for producers, directors, writers, development personnel, and aspiring media executives examines the changing business issues associated with the entertainment industry. Through lectures, discussions with industry guests, and case studies, instruction focuses on current business and production issues, and introduces new business models to navigate content onto new distribution platforms. Some history is highlighted to provide a context for current practices and potential. The course also features opportunities to meet senior entertainment industry executives in various sectors. By the end of the course, students should have an understanding of the opportunities available in the business of entertainment.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1

This course is a survey of Japanese popular culture with particular topics covered such as anime manga, fashion, music, art and food. Part of the course will focus on Japanese animation within a historic and popular cultural perspective. Both anime and manga will be examined with particular emphasis on the art, culture and national and international popularity.

COURSE: FTFCFM300 / CPJLFM300
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course examines the context in which the Italian fashion system was born. Topics begin from the evolution of fashion from the post-WWII period to the present and address the role and influence of media and culture on factors such as economic and social status, the arts, and other issues that influenced fashion. Students explore fashion’s connection to identity, body, politics, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and how fashion and media are interrelated with these aspects of culture.

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COURSE: CPPULM330 / LACWLM330
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 4, B

The first of a two-part series on magazine production, this course gives students a professional magazine production experience as an academic course. Students, under the supervision of faculty members, will curate every phase of production brainstorming, design, writing, photos, editing, layouts, production, and distribution of a professional lifestyle magazine produced by the institution. The magazine and its semiannual format will represent the student’s approach to living in Florence and topics such as the arts, gastronomy, travel, style, city scenes, etc. from a cutting edge perspective that seeks to challenge and go beyond the surface of a city. Course projects and activities will interact with the journalism activities of Blending, the magazine of FUA’s campus press Ingorda. This project requires additional hours outside of regularly scheduled class times. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: DIPHPJ320 / CPJLPJ320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

Pre-requisite: This is an intermediate course. Knowledge of camera functions is required. Portfolio submission recommended.

During this two-pronged course, students will focus on: 1) the history and study of photojournalism from its genesis/inception to today and 2) assignments/projects that are journalistic newsworthy (events, human interest, artistic/cultural, sports, feature, and portrait). Students will emulate what it is like to be a newspaper photographer and learn storytelling images of the everyday events that occur in life. Through lectures and discussions students will also address contemporary issues such as: the cultural, social, and political influence of images and photojournalism in society as well as ethics and legal issues in photojournalism. The print lab will provide students with the tools for elaborating and printing their own images. This course is recommended for Communications, Journalism, and Social Sciences students. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: CPMCSM320
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July: Session 1, A

Pre-requisite: One communication course or equivalent.

What do we mean by “”community””? How do we encourage, discuss, analyze, understand, design, and participate in healthy communities in the age of many-to-many media? With the advent of virtual communities, smart mobs, and online social networks, old questions about the meaning of human social behavior have taken on renewed significance. Although this course is grounded in theory, it is equally rooted in practice, and much of the class discussion takes place in social cyberspaces. This course requires the active engagement of students and a willingness to experience a full immersion in social media practices. Much of the class discussion takes place in a variety of virtual world environments during and between face-to-face class meetings. Students who participate in this course will actively and productively engage in established and emerging forms of social media – and have some notion of how these practices affect the self and the community.

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COURSE: CPJLTW290 / LACWTW290
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

The basis of this course is the development of creative writing skills by focusing on the genre of travel writing. Students will read and discuss extracts from the great classics of travel writing as well as current travel journalism published in newspapers, magazines, and online. Assignments will focus on developing an individual voice, and honing ideas through revision and drafting. Topics will cover how to write for different audiences and publishing formats. Course projects and activities will interact with the journalism activities of Blending, the magazine and newsletter of FUA’s campus press Ingorda. This class includes experiential learning with CEMI.

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COURSE: 4JRNL007X
CREDITS: 20 UK credits
OFFERED: Session 2

This module offers students an introduction to the arts, entertainment, fashion, architecture and history that have made London the world’s most influential and vital cultural hub. Why see Paris and die when you can see London and live? How did London become the world capital of music, art, fashion, design, theatre, film, architecture, and so much else? From rock legends to the Royal Opera, Shakespeare to shock art and cathedrals to Canary Wharf, this module describes how London emerged from the ashes of war to become the most vibrant and culturally rich city on earth. It aims to give students an overall appreciation of London culture and to teach them the skills they need to write fluent, confident and relevant reviews across a variety of arts and entertainment genres. It will also give students an introduction to the various ways the arts are covered across all media platforms and to the work of some key London artists, designers and performers.

Site visit to Banksy exhibition (subject to change).

COURSE: 4TVPR001X
CREDITS: 20 UK credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Working in one large and several small groups students devise and produce a factual program realised in a multicamera studio.

Studio based multicamera television show. Students work in a large group to produce one 25-minute live magazine program. Through practice in the studio students learn the procedures and protocols necessary for shooting within a large crew, an “as live” TV studio show. Students learn how to schedule, source talent, produce a running order, design and build a simple set and work collectively towards the recording of a live show in a proscribed amount of ‘on-air’ time.

There is an emphasis on collective responsibility and problem solving. Students write a personal log plus a reflective and a critical analysis of the production process and their finished program.

*The Harrow Campus is located within zone 4. Most summer school students will purchase a zone 1-2 travelcard so should budget a little extra travel credit to cover zone extensions.

COURSE: THEATER 21
CREDITS: 2-4 US credits

Development and practice in acting techniques. Preparation and taping of scenes for analysis.

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COURSE: FILM TV 146
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Exploration of role of producer as both artist and business person. Comparative analysis of screenplays and completed films. Emphasis on assembly of creative team and analysis of industrial context, both independent and studio. Screenings viewed outside of class and on reserve at Powell Library.

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COURSE: COMM 157
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Analysis of how following personal lives of media-created celebrities impacts self-esteem, connectedness, and personal relationships from cultural studies and social sciences perspectives, and how entities cultivate celebrity for financial gain. Topics include celebrity gossip and privacy, news sharing, public relations, and impact of social media on fan support, image construction, and damage control.

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COURSE: FILM TV 12E
CREDITS: 4 US credits

With lectures, screenings, and demonstrations, study of principles of digital cinematography. How tools and techniques affect visual storytelling process. Topics include formats, aspect ratios, cameras, lenses, special effects, internal menu picture manipulation, lighting, composition, coverage, high definition, digital exhibition, filtration, multiple-camera shooting.

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COURSE: FILM TV 122J
CREDITS: 5 Units

Study and analysis of Disney’s animated features. Evaluation of why Disney’s animated features have dominated until recently and ramifications of this dominance on animation and society.

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COURSE: THEATER 30
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Intended for Theater minors and other non majors. Exploration and development of creative writing skills for one or more of various forms of entertainment media.

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COURSE: FILM TV 122D
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Practical application of film editing techniques, how they have evolved, and continue to evolve. Examination of history of editing, as well as current editing trends, terminology, and workflow.

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COURSE: FILM TV 122M
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Through discussions, screenings, demonstrations, and guests, exploration of script, previsualization, directing actors, directing camera coverage in relationship to story, practical on-set directing, and directing for camera.

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COURSE: COMM 148
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of key concepts and methods in marketing communications in both traditional and digital media. Development and execution of communications strategies, with primary emphasis on consumer insight, branding, market segmentation and positioning, message strategy, promotion, and execution of marketing communications through appropriate media technologies.

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COURSE: FILM TV 4
CREDITS: 5 Units

Students acquire understanding of practical and aesthetic challenges undertaken by artists and professionals in making of motion pictures and television. Examination of film as both art and industry: storytelling, sound and visual design, casting and performance, editing, finance, advertising, and distribution. Exploration of American and world cinema from filmmaker’s perspective. Honing of analytical skills and development of critical vocabulary for study of filmmaking as technical, artistic, and cultural phenomenon.

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COURSE: FILM TV 33
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Structural analysis of feature films and development of professional screenwriters’ vocabulary for constructing, deconstructing, and reconstructing their own work. Screenings of films and selected film sequences in class and by assignment.

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COURSE: ENGL 119
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H.

Exploration of place of literary imagination in making of cities, with focus on questions of cultural exchange, development, migration, urban rebellion, and style. Topics may include meaning of urban space and time, city as urban village or cosmopolitan hub, segregated dystopia or postmodern future, and impact of exile, tourism, and migration in making of cities. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.

Examination–through poetry, novels, stories, music, and film–New York underground, whether that be of avant-garde artists, people living on edge of respectability (such as hustlers or punks), or people otherwise marginalized by dominant cultural norms. Students read stories and watch feature films that depict this underground; but also look at material produced by artists that challenged cultural and aesthetic norms. Writers and artists include Glenn Branca, Frank O’Hara, Martin Scorsese, Patti Smith, Andy Warhol, David Wojnarowicz, and many others.

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COURSE: ETHNMUS 30
CREDITS: 5 Units

Exploration of ways music is mediated to people by industry, technologies, and corporations. Survey of leading theorists of media and exploration of case studies.

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COURSE: FILM TV 84A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Examination of evolving economic structures and business practices in contemporary Hollywood film industry, with emphasis on operations of studios and independent distribution companies, their development, marketing, and distribution systems, and their relationship to independent producers, talent, and agencies.

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COURSE: FILM TV 183A
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Critical analysis of contemporary entertainment industries and practical approach to understanding and implementing producer’s role in development of feature film and television scripts. Through scholarly and trade journal readings, in-class discussions, script analysis, and select guest speakers, exposure to various entities that comprise feature film and television development process. Basic introduction to story and exploration of proper technique for evaluating screenplays and teleplays through writing of coverage.

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COURSE: COM LIT 1E
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Pre-requisite: Satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing Requirement.

Study of social media as platform for storytelling, with core focus on three distinct cultures: U.S., China, and Russia. History, form, and various functions of social media. Examination of how we tell stories about ourselves and how we interpret digital narratives we see, hear, or read from organizations near and far. Analysis of networked narratives encountered online.

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COURSE: COMM M147
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Studies in relationship between mass communication and social organization. Topics include history and organization of major media institutions, social forces that shape production of mass media news and entertainment, selected studies in media content, and effects of media on society.

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COURSE: MUSC 7
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Musical experience helpful, but not required. Brief historical survey of film music, with strong emphasis on recent development: Japanese animation, advertising, and MTV, as well as computer tools and digital scoring methods. Designed to inspire and inform those interested in movie music.

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COURSE: GENDER M111
CREDITS: 5 Units

Historical issues and critical approaches to women and cinema that may include authorship, stardom, female genres, and images of women in Hollywood cinema, alternative cinema, and independent cinema from silent era to present.

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COURSE: ISSU9DM
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 1

This strategic communications module will give an introduction to methods and tools for the understanding, analysis and manipulation of social data. Students will learn about social network analysis, sentiment analysis and topic modelling. They will develop an understanding of how these can help marketers work on their strategies, how journalists write their stories and policymakers take decisions. This module gives students the opportunity to learn about the basic models of social data analysis and cutting-edge methods and software for data analysis.

COURSE: ISSU9MV
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 2

From sparkly vampires to blockbuster monsters, gothic tropes appear to be all-pervasive in contemporary culture. As Catherine Spooner claims in Contemporary Gothic (2006), like ‘a malevolent virus, Gothic narratives have escaped the confines of literature and spread across disciplinary boundaries to infect all kinds of media, from fashion and advertising to the way contemporary events are constructed in mass culture’. What this course aims to do is to introduce students to Gothic’s literary expression in the British nineteenth century, before exploring the many ways in which this dark heritage continues to affect contemporary cultural production.

Focusing on three key texts from the nineteenth century, Frankenstein (1818), The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) and Dracula (1897), this class will discuss their adaptation, appropriation and influence on popular narratives such as those found in fiction, film, tv, fashion and music video. Some of the contemporary texts we will be drawing upon will be Twilight (book & film), True Blood (book & tv), Buffy the Vampire Slayer (film & tv), Scream (film), Supernatural (tv), Marilyn Manson (music), Interview with a Vampire (book & film), Blade (film), Blairwitch Project (film) etc.

Excursion(s): A visit to Edinburgh Dungeon and a gothic themed bar are included.

COURSE: ISSU9JO
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 1

For centuries, Britain’s kings and queens have had a powerful impact on society and on its institutions. Following the rise of celebrity culture, members of the British Royal family and other public figures have used their influence and financial muscle to push back journalists in order to reclaim their privacy. This module is aimed at journalism students and others interested in the media and its relationship with public figures, including Britain’s royals, who want to explore fundamental ethical principles and press freedom issues from the vantage point of some of the world’s most fascinating news stories. These cases range from Princess Diana’s death, for which the Paparazzi were blamed, to Prince Harry’s more recent indiscretions, which played out in the digital media.

Excursion (s): Excursions to Holyrood Palace and Scottish Parliament are included.

COURSE: ISSU9SS
CREDITS: 10 UK credits (24 contact hours + independent study & full-day excursion)
OFFERED: Session 1

This course is designed to introduce students to key theoretical debates that have emerged in the study of Scotland’s relationship with the film and television industries. Important questions we will consider include: Who is responsible for constructing Scotland’s identity onscreen? How are Scotland and Scottishness depicted? Why do certain representations dominate over others?

The course will begin by exploring ‘Hollywood Scotland’, concentrating on the commercial cinematic representation of Scotland and Scottishness found in Mel Gibson’s Braveheart (1995). This will then be contrasted with a more local construction of Scotland found in the long running television show Taggart (ITV, 1983-2011). The final weeks will conclude by considering filmmaking in contemporary Scotland, first through contemplation of the importance of short films in the Scottish context, focusing in particular on the shorts and careers of Lynne Ramsay, Peter Mullan and Morag McKinnon, and second through examination of the Scottish/Danish co-produced ‘Advance Party’ initiative.

Excursion(s): You’ll have the opportunity to visit a celebrated screen location or meet a Scottish filmmaker.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 1

This course is a survey of Japanese popular culture with particular topics covered such as anime manga, fashion, music, art and food. Part of the course will focus on Japanese animation within a historic and popular cultural perspective. Both anime and manga will be examined with particular emphasis on the art, culture and national and international popularity.

CREDITS: 4 Japanese credits (3 US credits) / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: Session 2

The focus of this course is an introduction to film and visual art culture in Japan. A variety of topics will be covered as well as video art and film festivals. We will understand the history and analyse art, film and visual culture to better understand contemporary social and cultural aspects and issues in Japan. We will also include topics on gender, society, family, national values, race and ethnicity and the ways they are portrayed in content and form. We will analyse the nature of the Japanese aesthetic and of post-war Japanese Cinema in contemporary Japan.

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