STEM Courses

You can fit study abroad into your Uni study plan in Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics! Take classes overseas on a short-term study program to fulfil your academic requirements. From exploring tropical marine biology to computer science, or animal studies to sustainable development – we've got options!
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Program Types:
  • January Study
  • July Study
  • Language Study
Countries:
  • Belize
  • Cambodia
  • Canada
  • China & Hong Kong
  • Costa Rica
  • Czech Republic
  • England
  • Fiji
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Malaysia
  • Morocco
  • Nepal
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Scotland
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • Uganda
  • USA
  • Vietnam
  • Zambia
Area of Study:
  • STEM
    • Animal and Marine Science
    • Biology
    • Chemistry
    • Computer Science, IT and Cyber Security
    • Engineering
    • Mathematics and Statistics
    • Physics
    • Sustainable Development and Environmental Studies

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Available Courses by Program
COURSE: BIOA201
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: One of ARCH 101, ANTH 103, ANTH 106, BIOA 101, BIOL 112, CELS 191, HUBS 191, HUBS 192 and 36 further points, OR 108 points.

An introduction to human bioarchaeology, particularly evolutionary and comparative anatomy of the human body, what makes it unique among other primates, and why it varies among populations. Includes aspects of forensic anthropology.

What makes humans unique to all other primates, and how did we come to be that way? How can we explain the variation in morphology among human populations? How can we use aspects of the skeleton of past people to look at their life history? This paper explores these questions by providing an introduction to the study of Biological Anthropology of the human skeleton. The paper primarily focuses on the evolution, structure and function of the human skeletal system, with an introduction to bioarchaeological and forensic methods.

Assessment
Internal assessment: 40%
Final examination (2 hours): 60%

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COURSE: PHSI191
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: Students should have passed at least 5 out of 6 laboratories in PHSI 191, but failed overall in the course with a total final mark of at least 30%. Students who have not met this requirement may seek special permission to enter.

Foundations of physics for the health sciences, including mechanics, properties of fluids and solids, thermodynamics and DC circuits, and radiation and health.

This course is intended for students who have passed their laboratory component in the 2019 first semester PHSI 191 course but failed the course overall with a total mark of at least 30%. This course will be similar to PHSI 191 although there will be no laboratory component, and it will have significantly more tutorial-style contact. The laboratory component of a student’s internal assessment in the 2019 first semester course will be carried over to the Summer School course.

Assessment
Mid-school test: 18%
Homework assignments (6 x 1%): 6%
Lab grade carried over from first semester 2019: 6%
Final examination: 70%

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COURSE: FORB201
CREDITS: 18 points

Pre-requisite: 54 points. Open for Interest Only enrolment with Head of Department permission.

Increasingly, forensic investigations have come to rest on the techniques of forensic biology to provide vital evidence in homicides, violent crimes, disaster identification and even minor crimes. This course is designed as an introduction for the student who is interested in analysing biological evidence as it relates to legal and other investigations, or collecting and processing evidence at a crime scene or in a laboratory. Students will have an unequalled opportunity to interact with a range of national and international forensic experts, providing a sense of reality and authority that is unique.

The course provides a strong basis in modern forensic biology techniques. The multidisciplinary nature of forensics depends on the integration of scientific skills within a forensic context, and hence the course includes a wide spectrum of topics.

Assessment
Test: 20%
Assignment: 30%
Final examination (2 hour): 50%

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COURSE: CHEM191
CREDITS: 18 points

An introduction to the concepts of chemistry underlying important processes in biology and human health, including chemical bonding, energetics, kinetics, equilibria and solubility, properties of water and solutions, acids, bases, complexation and electron transfer, mechanisms of organic reactions and properties of amino acids and carbohydrates.

CHEM 191 aims to instill a fundamental knowledge of chemical structure and reactivity, with particular focus on concepts that provide an understanding of why chemical reactions proceed and how this understanding may be applied to the chemical processes in biological systems.

CHEM 191 provides an introduction to concepts influencing chemical reactions in biological systems including:

  • Concepts of Chemical Bonding
  • Thermodynamics/energetics of biological systems
  • Properties of water
  • Reaction rates and chemical equilibria
  • Metals in biology – electron transfer, complexation
  • Organic/carbon-based compounds – stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, functional groups, polymers
  • Biological molecules – carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleic acids, nucleic acids, proteins/enzymes
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COURSE: ENV 3190J
CREDITS: 6 US credits / 80 contact hours

Prerequisite: General Biology.

This course is aimed to highlight the importance of tropical marine biology to study the biology and the interaction of marine species that we will discovery in the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. Marine ecosystems of the eastern tropical Pacific provide a baseline source for species of high commercial interest in satisfying humans demand for food worldwide. However, numerous marine species are threatened by unsustainable human activities, such as overfishing and habitat destruction. We will develop a critical understanding of concepts and application in Marine Biology, where the students will also be introduced to a wide range of practical activities by visiting field stations and natural laboratories in Costa Rica.

COURSE: CAS BI 407
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 107).

Ethological approach to animal behavior; physiological, ontogenic, and phylogenic causes; and adaptive significance of behavior examined within an evolutionary framework, minimally including humans. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 421 / CAS BI 421
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 204 or CAS CH 212 or CAS CH 214) or equivalent.

Introductory biochemistry. Protein structure and folding, enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and allostery; nucleic acid structure; macromolecular biosynthesis with emphasis on specificity and fidelity; lipids and membrane structure; vitamins and coenzymes; introduction to intermediary metabolism. Students must register for three sections: lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS CH 423
CREDITS: 3 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS CH 204 or CAS CH 212 or CAS CH 214) or equivalent.

Introductory biochemistry. Protein structure and folding, enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and allostery; nucleic acid structure; macromolecular biosynthesis with emphasis on specificity and fidelity; lipids and membrane structure; vitamins and coenzymes; introduction to intermediary metabolism.

Not acceptable for credit toward the chemistry major or minor. For students who do not require laboratory credit.

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COURSE: CAS BI 107
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

For students who plan to major in the natural sciences or environmental science, and for premedical students. Required for biology majors. No prerequisite. High school biology is assumed. The evolution and diversity of life; principles of ecology; behavioral biology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning I, Critical Thinking, Research and Information Literacy.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 108
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

For students planning to major in the natural sciences and for premedical students. Required for biology majors. It is strongly recommended students complete CAS CH 101 (or equivalent) before this course. High school biology is assumed. Cell and molecular biology, Mendelian & molecular genetics, physiology, and neurobiology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry II, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking, Teamwork/Collaboration.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 525 / CAS NE 525
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS NE 102 or CAS BI 203) and (CAS NE 203 or CAS BI 325).

An in- depth look at molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and their impact and relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment. Topics include the molecular pathways of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Creutzfeldt- Jacob Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 551
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 203 or CAS BI 206) , or consent of instructor.

Views on stem cell research range from assumptions of a potential cure for most diseases to fears that it will depreciate the value of human life. This course equips students with the science that underlies this discussion, including the biological properties of stem cells and the experimental hurdles to utilization in regenerative medicine. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 203
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 108 & CAS CH 102) or equivalent. Coreq: (CAS CH 203) or equivalent.

Principles of cellular organization and function: biological molecules, flow of genetic information, membranes and subcellular organelles, and cell regulation. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

Students may receive credit for CAS BI 203 or 213, but not both.

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COURSE: CAS BI 410
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 203) or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Contemporary aspects of embryonic development, drawing from current literature. Emphasis on the use of experimental approaches to address topics such as polarity in the egg, body axis specification, embryonic patterning, and organogenesis. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 309
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 107 & CAS BI 108) or equivalent.

Introduction to modern concepts, controversies, and analytical approaches in evolutionary biology. Topics include adaptation, natural and sexual selection, species and speciation, phylogenetics, comparative analysis, basic population and quantitative genetics, origin of novelty, adaptive radiation, development and evolution. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 383
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 281 & CAS BI 282) and enrollment in Seven-Year Liberal Arts/Medical Education Program.

An introduction to physiological principles applied across the levels of organization (cell, tissue, organ systems). Intended to prepare the student for more advanced courses in physiology. Topics include homeostasis and neural, muscle, cardiopulmonary, renal, endocrine, metabolic, and reproductive physiology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 311
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 203 & CAS BI 206) or consent of instructor.

Biology of bacteria and related microorganisms; morphology, physiology, genetics, ecology, and control. Brief introduction to pathogenicity and host reactions. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 206
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 108 & CAS CH 203) or equivalent.

Principles of classical, molecular, and evolutionary genetics derived from analytical, molecular, and whole genome cytological evidence in animals, plants, and microorganisms.

Students must attend both lecture and discussion. Students may receive credit for CAS BI 206 or 216, but not both.

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COURSE: SAR HS 581
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: ((CAS BI 105 & CAS BI 106) or (CAS BI 107 & CAS BI 108)) and (CAS BI 211 or CAS BI 315).

Regional approach to the musculoskeletal, peripheral nervous, and circulatory systems of the human body. Laboratories reinforce the lectures by a study of osteology, prosected cadavers, and live anatomy palpations. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 210
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 105) or equivalent.

Intensive preprofessional course for students whose programs require anatomy. Not for biology major or minor credit. Gross structure of the human body; skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title formerly numbered CAS BI 106.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS AN 102
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1 and 2

Introduces basic principles of evolutionary biology, human origins, genetics, reproduction, socio-ecology, and the evolution of primate and human behavior and adaptions. Laboratory sections include examination of fossil and skeletal material, and hands-on projects involving human and primate behavior and biology.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: CAS BI 114
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

A study of the world’s major human diseases, their causes, effects on history, pathology, and cures. Principles of immunology. Emphasis on present maladies such as AIDS, herpes, cancer, mononucleosis, tuberculosis, influenza, and hepatitis. This course is appropriate for non-majors and students in the health and paramedical sciences. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. Not for Biology major or minor credit. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Scientific Inquiry I, Quantitative Reasoning II, Critical Thinking.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS BI 211
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: ((CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108) and (CAS BI 106 or CAS BI 210)) or equivalent. Some knowledge of chemistry and anatomy is assumed. Intended mainly for students in health sciences. Not for biology major or minor credit; Biology majors/minors should take CAS BI 315.

Introduction to principles of systemic mammalian physiology with special reference to humans. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS NE 101
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

An introduction to the biological basis of behavior and cognition. Includes theoretical and practical foundations rooted in psychology, biology, neuropharmacology, and clinical sciences (e.g., neurology and neuropsychiatry). Neuroethical dilemmas are highlighted and integrated when relevant to discussion topics.

Carries natural sciences divisional credit without lab in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Scientific Inquiry I.

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COURSE: CAS BI 552
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CASBI203 or CASBI213) and (CASBI206 or CASBI216).

How cells synthesize biologically important macromolecules (DNA, RNA and proteins), as well as their structure, function and regulation. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic molecular biology is discussed. Topics include: DNA replication, DNA repair, recombination, prokaryotic transcription, translation, eukaryotic transcription/RNA processing, DNaseI hypersensitive sites, 5-methylcytosine, eukaryotic RNA polymerase structure/CTD modification, eukaryotic promoter structure, general transcription factors, enhancer-promoter loops, histone modification/chromatin remodeling, and non- coding RNA. Discussion of important molecular biological techniques, such as genetic and recombinant DNA techniques, including CRISPR/Cas9. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 594 / CAS NE 594
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: Any college-level neuroscience, psychology, or physiology course.

Exploration of the neuroscience of imagination from neurons to memory to neurological control of novel conscious experiences. The course covers what makes the brain and human language unique as well as the selectional forces that shaped the brains of our ancestors. Students must attend both lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS CH 373
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

Prereq: (CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108 or CAS NE 102 or ENG BE 208) and (CAS CH 204 or CAS CH 214 or CAS CH 212 or CAS CH 174) or equivalent.

Introductory biochemistry focusing on structure/function with applications to medicine, nutrition, and biotechnology, including acid/base chemistry, protein structure, enzyme mechanisms, thermodynamics, and kinetics; nucleic acid structure/function, lipids and carbohydrates; bioenergetics of glycolysis and oxidative energy metabolism; lipid and nitrogen metabolism. Students must register for two sections: lecture and a discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 325
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 203) or consent of instructor.

Fundamentals of the nervous system, emphasizing synaptic transmission; hierarchical organization; autonomic nervous system; mechanisms of sensory perception; reflexes and motor function; biorhythms; and neural mechanisms of feeding, mating, learning, and memory. Students must register for two sections: lecture and discussion.

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COURSE: CAS BI 315
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 1

Prereq: (CAS BI 108 or ENG BE 209) and (CAS CH 101) and (CAS CH 102) or equivalent.

An introduction to physiological principles applied across all levels of organization (cell, tissue, organ system). Preparation for more advanced courses in physiology. Topics include homeostasis and neural, muscle, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and metabolic physiology. Students must register for two sections: lecture and laboratory.

There is an additional USD $200 lab fee for this course.

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COURSE: CAS AN 263
CREDITS: 4 US credits
OFFERED: Session 2

An exploration of female behavioral biology focusing on evolutionary, physiological, and biosocial aspects of women’s lives from puberty through pregnancy, birth, lactation, menopause, and aging. Examples are drawn from traditional and industrialized societies, and data from nonhuman primates are considered.

Counts for Natural Science credit; as a Biology – Specialization in Behavioral Biology – elective; and towards the Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies minor. Carries natural science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

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COURSE: SMBOAP200
CREDITS: 3 US credits / 45 contact hours
OFFERED: July Sessions: 3, B

This course provides a general introduction to the study of human anatomy and physiology. The course is designed for non-biology majors who want to learn the basics of anatomy. General properties of living organisms are considered while human structures and functions are emphasized. The class will study the creation of the human body, from cells to tissues, organs to organ systems, and finally the organism, along with the chemical and physical principles behind its operation, and the principal systems and their physiological processes will be discussed. In addition, students are given a historical overview of anatomical studies from the work of Galen in antiquity to the anatomical investigations of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Vesalius during the Renaissance. New and noninvasive technologies, such as MRI, that uncover parts of the human anatomy never seen before, will be introduced. Field trips include the La Specola Zoological Museum for its collection of 18th-century anatomical wax models.

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COURSE: LIFESCI 7A
CREDITS: 5 Units

Introduction to basic principles of cell structure and cell biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology.

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COURSE: PSYCH 118
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Survey of determinants of species-specific behavior, including genetic influences and learning.

Requisite: course 115. Designed for junior/senior majors.

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COURSE: LIFESCI 7B
CREDITS: 5 Units

Principles of Mendelian inheritance and population genetics. Introduction to principles and mechanisms of evolution by natural selection, population, behavioral, and community ecology, and biodiversity, including major taxa and their evolutionary, ecological, and physiological relationships.

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COURSE: NURSING 13
CREDITS: 5 Units

Structural presentation of human body, including musculoskeletal, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive systems. Laboratory uses virtual cadaver dissection and examination.

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COURSE: LIFESCI 23L
CREDITS: 3 Units

Pre-requisite: Life Sciences 2 or 7B.

Introductory life sciences laboratory designed for undergraduate students. Opportunity to conduct wet-laboratory and cutting-edge bioinformatics laboratory experiments. Students work in groups of three conducting experiments in areas of physiology, metabolism, cell biology, molecular biology, genotyping, and bioinformatics.

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COURSE: PSYCH 15
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Designed for non majors. Survey of genetic, evolutionary, physiological, pharmacological, and experiential factors affecting behavior. Using comparative approach where appropriate, emphasis on relevance of biological mechanisms to understanding of humans and their interaction with their environment.

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COURSE: ASTR5
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Life on Earth and prospects for life elsewhere in context of evolution of universe from simple to complex. Course material primarily from astronomy and biology but includes some chemistry, geology, and physics. Selected topics treated in some depth, but with little or no formal mathematics.

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COURSE: LIFESCI 7C
CREDITS: 5 Units

Pre-requisite: Life Sciences 7B.

Organization of cells into tissues and organs and principles of physiology of organ systems. Introduction to human genetics and genomics.

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COURSE: PSYCH 119Y
CREDITS: 4 US credits

Broad overview of scientific study of sexual behavior, with emphases on evolutionary, biological, psychological, and social considerations. Topics include historical antecedents of sex research, evolution of sex, influence of sex hormones on brain and behavior, sexual development, and roles of genes and hormones on sexual orientation.

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115.

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COURSE: ENV3050
CREDITS: 4 US credits / 60 contact hours

This entomology course explores the use of insects as food sources for human and animal feeding. In an era of a food crisis, climate change, habitat loss, air pollution and so many environmental problems, the look for more sustainable solutions is pushing to look back into ancient traditions, technical strategies and the scientific integration of both to supply the nutritional needs for human development. One of these possible solutions is the use of insects as food sources. Entomophagy is the practice of consuming edible insects. Latin America, South Asia, and African countries have engaged on entomophagy since ancient times. However, this is a disappearing practice. This course is theoretical and practical look at the origins of entomophagy, its current state and how to use it for a sustainable future. This course will be based on the study of multimedia, literature, visits and practical contact with edible insects whenever possible. Therefore, this course is aimed at any professional with an interesting sustainability, gastronomy, anthropology, and biology.

COURSE: ENV3160
CREDITS: 4 US credits / 60 contact hours

This course aims to highlight the importance of conservation biology in managing endangered marine species, emphasising recent conservation efforts for umbrella species such as sea turtles and sharks in the Pacific waters bordering Costa Rica. Marine ecosystems of the eastern tropical Pacific provide a baseline for species of high commercial interest that meet the global demand for food.

However, several marine species are threatened by unsustainable human activities such as overfishing and the destruction of habitat. We will develop a critical understanding of conservation biology, emphasising the general concept of biodiversity and examining present-day case studies that focus on scientific investigations to answer critical aspects of the history of life, recovery programs, species management, community conservation and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Students will also be introduced to a wide range of practical activities by visiting field stations and “natural laboratories” throughout Costa Rica.

COURSE: ENV3120
CREDITS: 4 US credits / 60 contact hours

This course is an introduction to the zoology of terrestrial vertebrates in Costa Rica. Students will gain knowledge of various biological characteristics of the groups of land chordates in the country. Costa Rica has an immensely rich animal biodiversity, with an influence of both North American and South American fauna, and is a world renowned hot spot for animal research and conservation. Emphasis will be given to the study of Costa Rican species, but others will be discussed as well.

COURSE: ENV3020
CREDITS: 4 US credits / 60 contact hours

The use of molecular biological approaches has revolutionized marine science research over the last decades. Therefore, these approaches offer extraordinary potential to address ecological questions in the marine realm, ranging from the identification of species to the understanding of the connectivity among populations. This course is focus in the use of molecular markers base on the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to highlight the importance of conservation genetics and global-scale implications to manage endangered marine species. Hang on activities and lectures will be run in the Biomolecular lab (BIOMOL) from the CPI. In addition, the students will experience activities in the field to understand some controversial conservation issues related to keystone and endangered marine species in Costa Rica, such as sea turtles and sharks, collecting tissues samples and performing practical activities in the lab for DNA extractions, PCRs, electrophoresis, and the introduction to bioinformatics analyses.

COURSE: ENV3150
CREDITS: 4 US credits / 60 contact hours

This combined lecture and field course will provide students with a general overview of tropical plants. Students will gain knowledge of basic botanical concepts and will explore a variety of ecosystems, their plants and the multiple and complex ecological interactions that can be found in these areas. Costa Rica is a tropical country with an immensely rich biodiversity, providing a very representative area for these studies. Emphasis will be given to the most common plant families in Costa Rica, but others will be discussed as well.

COURSE: ENV3190
CREDITS: 4 US credits / 60 contact hours

This course studies the balance between ecosystems and the human stress and demands that are placed on the constantly changing marine environment. All field trips are mandatory.

For a $100 additional fee, certified divers may complete 2 immersions during each field trip (4 total).

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